Antimagnetic watch

magneticMagnetic resistanceMagnetic resistant watchesMagnetic-resistant watchnonmagnetic timepiece
Anti-magnetic (non-magnetic) watches are those that are able to run with minimal deviation when exposed to a certain level of magnetic field.wikipedia
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Invar

invar-wire
The first way consists of making the moving parts of alloys chosen to be insensitive to magnetic fields. These alloys include Invar (iron–nickel–carbon–chromium alloy), Glucydur (beryllium–bronze alloy), Nivarox (iron–nickel–chromium–titanium–beryllium alloy) and Elinvar (an alloy similar to Invar, though less resistant to magnetism and more resistant to thermal influence). These alloys are preferred by different watchmakers due to their differing properties. Since the 1950s, Nivarox and Glucydur were extensively used by watchmakers. In the 1960s, almost all Swiss watches had Glucydur balance and Nivarox hairsprings. The anchors, escape wheels and other watch mechanisms were also made of non-magnetic metals or alloys.
Invar is used where high dimensional stability is required, such as precision instruments, clocks, seismic creep gauges, television shadow-mask frames, valves in engines, antimagnetic watches, and large aerostructure molds.

Vacheron Constantin

Vacheron & Constantin-Le Coultre Watches, Inc.
Watchmakers from Vacheron Constantin were among the first to experiment with anti-magnetic features of a watch.
In 1885, created the first nonmagnetic timepiece which included a complete lever assortment made of materials able to withstand magnetic fields. Its construction included a balance wheel, balance spring and lever shaft that were made of palladium, the lever arms—in bronze and the escape wheel was in gold.

Charles Édouard Guillaume

Charles É. GuillaumeGuillaume, Charles Edouard
In 1896 Charles Édouard Guillaume discovered the nickel based alloy Invar. Afterwards, in 1920, when he received the Nobel Prize in Physics, he developed another alloy - Elinvar. These alloys assisted in the assembly of anti-magnetic watches.
Elinvar is also non-magnetic, which is a secondary useful property for antimagnetic watches.

Water Resistant mark

water resistancewater resistantWater resistant watch
Today, even divers' watches (according to ISO 6425) must be anti-magnetic as well as being water resistant, sufficiently luminous, shock resistant and have solid straps.
No magnetic or shock resistance properties are required.

Shock-resistant watch

shockShock resistanceshock resistant
Today, even divers' watches (according to ISO 6425) must be anti-magnetic as well as being water resistant, sufficiently luminous, shock resistant and have solid straps.
Magnetic-resistant watch

Magnetic field

magnetic fieldsmagneticmagnetic flux density
Anti-magnetic (non-magnetic) watches are those that are able to run with minimal deviation when exposed to a certain level of magnetic field. According to ISO 764 or its equivalent DIN 8309 (Deutsches Institut für Normung - German Institute for Standardization) a watch must resist exposition to a direct current magnetic field of 4 800 A/m.

International Organization for Standardization

ISOInternational Organization for Standardization (ISO)ISO standard
The International Organization for Standardization issued a standard for magnetic-resistant watches, which many countries have adopted.

Deutsches Institut für Normung

DINDIN standardGerman Institute for Standardization
According to ISO 764 or its equivalent DIN 8309 (Deutsches Institut für Normung - German Institute for Standardization) a watch must resist exposition to a direct current magnetic field of 4 800 A/m.

Ampere

AmAamp
According to ISO 764 or its equivalent DIN 8309 (Deutsches Institut für Normung - German Institute for Standardization) a watch must resist exposition to a direct current magnetic field of 4 800 A/m.

Metre

metermmetres
According to ISO 764 or its equivalent DIN 8309 (Deutsches Institut für Normung - German Institute for Standardization) a watch must resist exposition to a direct current magnetic field of 4 800 A/m.

Alloy

alloysmetal alloyalloying
The first way consists of making the moving parts of alloys chosen to be insensitive to magnetic fields. These alloys include Invar (iron–nickel–carbon–chromium alloy), Glucydur (beryllium–bronze alloy), Nivarox (iron–nickel–chromium–titanium–beryllium alloy) and Elinvar (an alloy similar to Invar, though less resistant to magnetism and more resistant to thermal influence). These alloys are preferred by different watchmakers due to their differing properties. Since the 1950s, Nivarox and Glucydur were extensively used by watchmakers. In the 1960s, almost all Swiss watches had Glucydur balance and Nivarox hairsprings. The anchors, escape wheels and other watch mechanisms were also made of non-magnetic metals or alloys.

Iron

FeFe 2+ Fe(III)
The first way consists of making the moving parts of alloys chosen to be insensitive to magnetic fields. These alloys include Invar (iron–nickel–carbon–chromium alloy), Glucydur (beryllium–bronze alloy), Nivarox (iron–nickel–chromium–titanium–beryllium alloy) and Elinvar (an alloy similar to Invar, though less resistant to magnetism and more resistant to thermal influence). These alloys are preferred by different watchmakers due to their differing properties. Since the 1950s, Nivarox and Glucydur were extensively used by watchmakers. In the 1960s, almost all Swiss watches had Glucydur balance and Nivarox hairsprings. The anchors, escape wheels and other watch mechanisms were also made of non-magnetic metals or alloys.

Nickel

NiNi 2+ Nickel (Ni)
The first way consists of making the moving parts of alloys chosen to be insensitive to magnetic fields. These alloys include Invar (iron–nickel–carbon–chromium alloy), Glucydur (beryllium–bronze alloy), Nivarox (iron–nickel–chromium–titanium–beryllium alloy) and Elinvar (an alloy similar to Invar, though less resistant to magnetism and more resistant to thermal influence). These alloys are preferred by different watchmakers due to their differing properties. Since the 1950s, Nivarox and Glucydur were extensively used by watchmakers. In the 1960s, almost all Swiss watches had Glucydur balance and Nivarox hairsprings. The anchors, escape wheels and other watch mechanisms were also made of non-magnetic metals or alloys.

Carbon

Ccarbonaceouscarbon atom
The first way consists of making the moving parts of alloys chosen to be insensitive to magnetic fields. These alloys include Invar (iron–nickel–carbon–chromium alloy), Glucydur (beryllium–bronze alloy), Nivarox (iron–nickel–chromium–titanium–beryllium alloy) and Elinvar (an alloy similar to Invar, though less resistant to magnetism and more resistant to thermal influence). These alloys are preferred by different watchmakers due to their differing properties. Since the 1950s, Nivarox and Glucydur were extensively used by watchmakers. In the 1960s, almost all Swiss watches had Glucydur balance and Nivarox hairsprings. The anchors, escape wheels and other watch mechanisms were also made of non-magnetic metals or alloys.

Chromium

Crchromechromium(III)
The first way consists of making the moving parts of alloys chosen to be insensitive to magnetic fields. These alloys include Invar (iron–nickel–carbon–chromium alloy), Glucydur (beryllium–bronze alloy), Nivarox (iron–nickel–chromium–titanium–beryllium alloy) and Elinvar (an alloy similar to Invar, though less resistant to magnetism and more resistant to thermal influence). These alloys are preferred by different watchmakers due to their differing properties. Since the 1950s, Nivarox and Glucydur were extensively used by watchmakers. In the 1960s, almost all Swiss watches had Glucydur balance and Nivarox hairsprings. The anchors, escape wheels and other watch mechanisms were also made of non-magnetic metals or alloys.

Glucydur

The first way consists of making the moving parts of alloys chosen to be insensitive to magnetic fields. These alloys include Invar (iron–nickel–carbon–chromium alloy), Glucydur (beryllium–bronze alloy), Nivarox (iron–nickel–chromium–titanium–beryllium alloy) and Elinvar (an alloy similar to Invar, though less resistant to magnetism and more resistant to thermal influence). These alloys are preferred by different watchmakers due to their differing properties. Since the 1950s, Nivarox and Glucydur were extensively used by watchmakers. In the 1960s, almost all Swiss watches had Glucydur balance and Nivarox hairsprings. The anchors, escape wheels and other watch mechanisms were also made of non-magnetic metals or alloys.

Beryllium

Be 7 BeBe'''ryllium
The first way consists of making the moving parts of alloys chosen to be insensitive to magnetic fields. These alloys include Invar (iron–nickel–carbon–chromium alloy), Glucydur (beryllium–bronze alloy), Nivarox (iron–nickel–chromium–titanium–beryllium alloy) and Elinvar (an alloy similar to Invar, though less resistant to magnetism and more resistant to thermal influence). These alloys are preferred by different watchmakers due to their differing properties. Since the 1950s, Nivarox and Glucydur were extensively used by watchmakers. In the 1960s, almost all Swiss watches had Glucydur balance and Nivarox hairsprings. The anchors, escape wheels and other watch mechanisms were also made of non-magnetic metals or alloys.

Bronze

bronzesbronzewaremanganese bronze
The first way consists of making the moving parts of alloys chosen to be insensitive to magnetic fields. These alloys include Invar (iron–nickel–carbon–chromium alloy), Glucydur (beryllium–bronze alloy), Nivarox (iron–nickel–chromium–titanium–beryllium alloy) and Elinvar (an alloy similar to Invar, though less resistant to magnetism and more resistant to thermal influence). These alloys are preferred by different watchmakers due to their differing properties. Since the 1950s, Nivarox and Glucydur were extensively used by watchmakers. In the 1960s, almost all Swiss watches had Glucydur balance and Nivarox hairsprings. The anchors, escape wheels and other watch mechanisms were also made of non-magnetic metals or alloys.

Nivarox

The first way consists of making the moving parts of alloys chosen to be insensitive to magnetic fields. These alloys include Invar (iron–nickel–carbon–chromium alloy), Glucydur (beryllium–bronze alloy), Nivarox (iron–nickel–chromium–titanium–beryllium alloy) and Elinvar (an alloy similar to Invar, though less resistant to magnetism and more resistant to thermal influence). These alloys are preferred by different watchmakers due to their differing properties. Since the 1950s, Nivarox and Glucydur were extensively used by watchmakers. In the 1960s, almost all Swiss watches had Glucydur balance and Nivarox hairsprings. The anchors, escape wheels and other watch mechanisms were also made of non-magnetic metals or alloys.

Titanium

Tititanium oretitanian
The first way consists of making the moving parts of alloys chosen to be insensitive to magnetic fields. These alloys include Invar (iron–nickel–carbon–chromium alloy), Glucydur (beryllium–bronze alloy), Nivarox (iron–nickel–chromium–titanium–beryllium alloy) and Elinvar (an alloy similar to Invar, though less resistant to magnetism and more resistant to thermal influence). These alloys are preferred by different watchmakers due to their differing properties. Since the 1950s, Nivarox and Glucydur were extensively used by watchmakers. In the 1960s, almost all Swiss watches had Glucydur balance and Nivarox hairsprings. The anchors, escape wheels and other watch mechanisms were also made of non-magnetic metals or alloys.

Elinvar

new materials
The first way consists of making the moving parts of alloys chosen to be insensitive to magnetic fields. These alloys include Invar (iron–nickel–carbon–chromium alloy), Glucydur (beryllium–bronze alloy), Nivarox (iron–nickel–chromium–titanium–beryllium alloy) and Elinvar (an alloy similar to Invar, though less resistant to magnetism and more resistant to thermal influence). These alloys are preferred by different watchmakers due to their differing properties. Since the 1950s, Nivarox and Glucydur were extensively used by watchmakers. In the 1960s, almost all Swiss watches had Glucydur balance and Nivarox hairsprings. The anchors, escape wheels and other watch mechanisms were also made of non-magnetic metals or alloys.

Magnetism

magneticmagneticsmagnetically
The first way consists of making the moving parts of alloys chosen to be insensitive to magnetic fields. These alloys include Invar (iron–nickel–carbon–chromium alloy), Glucydur (beryllium–bronze alloy), Nivarox (iron–nickel–chromium–titanium–beryllium alloy) and Elinvar (an alloy similar to Invar, though less resistant to magnetism and more resistant to thermal influence). These alloys are preferred by different watchmakers due to their differing properties. Since the 1950s, Nivarox and Glucydur were extensively used by watchmakers. In the 1960s, almost all Swiss watches had Glucydur balance and Nivarox hairsprings. The anchors, escape wheels and other watch mechanisms were also made of non-magnetic metals or alloys.

Permeability (electromagnetism)

permeabilitymagnetic permeabilityrelative permeability
Another way of making a watch non-magnetic is to house the entire movement into a case made of a highly permeable (magnetically conductive) material. The movement is covered by an additional soft-iron clasp to prevent the forming of magnetic fields inside the watch itself.

Metal

metalsmetal ionsmetal ion
That watch was able to withstand magnetic fields because some of its parts were made of non-magnetic metals: the palladium-made balance wheel, balance spring and the lever shaft.

Palladium

Pdpalladium catalystpalladium(0)
That watch was able to withstand magnetic fields because some of its parts were made of non-magnetic metals: the palladium-made balance wheel, balance spring and the lever shaft.