Antipodeans

The AntipodeansantipodeanAntipodean Manifesto
The Antipodeans were a group of Australian modern artists who asserted the importance of figurative art, and protested against abstract expressionism.wikipedia
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Charles Blackman

BlackmansCharles Raymond Blackman
The artists were Charles Blackman, Arthur Boyd, David Boyd, John Brack, Robert Dickerson, John Perceval and Clifton Pugh.
He was a member of the Antipodeans, a group of Melbourne painters that also included Arthur Boyd, David Boyd, John Brack, Robert Dickerson, John Perceval, and Clifton Pugh.

Arthur Boyd

ArthurArthur (painter, ceramics)Arthur and Yvonne Boyd
The artists were Charles Blackman, Arthur Boyd, David Boyd, John Brack, Robert Dickerson, John Perceval and Clifton Pugh.
Boyd was a member of the Antipodeans, a group of Melbourne painters that also included Clifton Pugh, David Boyd, John Brack, Robert Dickerson, John Perceval and Charles Blackman.

John Brack

The artists were Charles Blackman, Arthur Boyd, David Boyd, John Brack, Robert Dickerson, John Perceval and Clifton Pugh.
John Brack (10 May 1920 – 11 February 1999) was an Australian painter, and a member of the Antipodeans group.

Robert Dickerson

The artists were Charles Blackman, Arthur Boyd, David Boyd, John Brack, Robert Dickerson, John Perceval and Clifton Pugh.
Robert Henry Dickerson (30 March 1924 – 18 October 2015) was an Australian figurative painter and former member of the Antipodeans group of artists.

Clifton Pugh

Cliff PughClifton Ernest Pugh
The artists were Charles Blackman, Arthur Boyd, David Boyd, John Brack, Robert Dickerson, John Perceval and Clifton Pugh.
Important early group exhibitions include The Antipodeans, the exhibition for which Bernard Smith drafted a manifesto in support of Australian figurative painting, an exhibition in which Arthur Boyd, David Boyd, John Brack, Robert Dickerson, John Perceval and Charles Blackman showed; a joint exhibition with Barry Humphries, in which the two responded to Dadaism; and Group of Four at the Victorian Artists Society Gallery with Pugh, John Howley, Don Laycock and Lawrence Daws.

Bernard Smith (art historian)

Bernard SmithSmith, BernardBernard William SMITH
The Antipodeans group consisted of seven modern painters and the art historian Bernard Smith, who compiled The Antipodean Manifesto, a declaration fashioned from the artists' comments as a catalogue essay to accompany their exhibit.
In 1959, he convened a group of seven emerging figurative painters known as the Antipodeans, which organised its only exhibition in August 1959.

David Boyd (artist)

David BoydDavidDavid (pottery, painting)
The artists were Charles Blackman, Arthur Boyd, David Boyd, John Brack, Robert Dickerson, John Perceval and Clifton Pugh.
He joined the Antipodeans Group in the 1950s.

Heide Circle

Heide
In 1959 none were direct members of the Heide Circle that had maintained its importance with the Melbourne Branch of the Contemporary Art Society (CAS) since the early 1940s.
The Heide Circle continued in their commitment to Figurative Modernism through the 1950s and 1960s, with several of the artists forming the Antipodeans Group and taking a stand against the new abstract art.

George Johnson (artist)

George Johnson
Their case was not helped by the fact that they were all enjoying some commercial success, as against their immediate rivals (the local abstractionists Roger Kemp, Leonard French, Inge King and George Johnson) who were struggling.
The latter artists eventually formed the Antipodeans Group, staging an exhibition in August 1959, initially to make a stand against Johnson, French, Kemp and a growing number of non-objectivist followers, although increasingly to express their opposition to American Abstract Expressionism which they feared was about to overwhelm Australian art.

Australian art

Australian artistvisual artsart
Art of Australia
Australia has produced many notable artists of both Western and Indigenous Australian schools, including the late-19th-century Heidelberg School plein air painters, the Antipodeans, the Central Australian Hermannsburg School watercolourists, the Western Desert Art Movement and coeval examples of well-known High modernism and Postmodern art.

Carl Plate

In 1961 a group calling themselves Sydney 9 — which included the Australian abstract artists Hector Gilliland, Carl Plate, Leonard Hessing, Stan Rapotec, John Olsen, Robert Klippel, Clement Meadmore and Bill Rose — held an exhibition of paintings and sculpture to counter the Antipodeans group.
Plate was a member of the group calling themselves Sydney 9, which included Robert Hughes, Robert Klippel, Clement Meadmore, John Olsen and Stanislav Rapotec, holding exhibitions in Sydney and Melbourne to show that as well as the Antipodeans, the Sydney abstractionists were an important part of the Australian art scene.

Stuckism in Australia

Stuckism in Australia
An earlier group of seven artists in Australia (six of them Melbourne based) called the Antipodeans Group also issued a manifesto to promote modern figurative painting in opposition to the prevailing orthodoxy, which at that time was Abstract Expressionism.

Australians

AustralianAussieAustralia
The Antipodeans were a group of Australian modern artists who asserted the importance of figurative art, and protested against abstract expressionism.

Figurative art

figurativefigurative paintingfiguration
The Antipodeans were a group of Australian modern artists who asserted the importance of figurative art, and protested against abstract expressionism.

Abstract expressionism

abstract expressionistabstract expressionistsabstract
The Antipodeans were a group of Australian modern artists who asserted the importance of figurative art, and protested against abstract expressionism.

John Perceval

The artists were Charles Blackman, Arthur Boyd, David Boyd, John Brack, Robert Dickerson, John Perceval and Clifton Pugh.

Sydney

Sydney, AustraliaSydney, New South WalesGreater Metropolitan Sydney
Only Dickerson, from Sydney, was not Melbourne-based of this group.

Melbourne

Melbourne, AustraliaMelbourne, VictoriaMelbourne, VIC
Only Dickerson, from Sydney, was not Melbourne-based of this group.

Boyd family

Boyd artistic dynastyBoyd family artistic dynastyBoyd artistic family
Three were Boyd family members and all were fraternal painters of some stature working within their maintained styles of realistic imagery.

Victorian Artists Society

Victorian Artists' SocietyAlbert Street ConservatoriumVictorian Artists Society Gallery
Notably, they did not exhibit in the CAS's own gallery, as the society opposed the show, but chose instead to use the premises of the rival Victorian Artists' Society, long a bastion for cultural conservatism in Melbourne.

Museum of Modern Art

MoMAThe Museum of Modern ArtMuseum of Modern Art (MoMA)
The Antipodean Manifesto was a reaction to the considerable public success of the museum exhibition, The New American Painting, an authoritative survey of abstract expressionism organised by New York's Museum of Modern Art, which was touring Europe over 1958–59.

Roger Kemp

Their case was not helped by the fact that they were all enjoying some commercial success, as against their immediate rivals (the local abstractionists Roger Kemp, Leonard French, Inge King and George Johnson) who were struggling.

Leonard French

Leonard William French
Their case was not helped by the fact that they were all enjoying some commercial success, as against their immediate rivals (the local abstractionists Roger Kemp, Leonard French, Inge King and George Johnson) who were struggling.

Inge King

Inge King (née Neufeld)Ingeborg Victoria King
Their case was not helped by the fact that they were all enjoying some commercial success, as against their immediate rivals (the local abstractionists Roger Kemp, Leonard French, Inge King and George Johnson) who were struggling.

Kenneth Clark

Clark, KennethSir Kenneth ClarkLord Clark
Nevertheless, with the assistance of British museum director Kenneth Clark, works by group members were included in a 1961 exhibition entitled Recent Australian Painting at the Whitechapel Gallery in London (alongside that of Jon Molvig, Albert Tucker, Sidney Nolan, Fred Williams and others).