Antiquarian

antiquaryantiquariansantiquariesantiquarianismantiquarian societyantiquitiesAntiquairesantiquarian book dealerantiquarian interestsantiquarian writer
An antiquarian or antiquary (from the Latin: antiquarius, meaning pertaining to ancient times) is an aficionado or student of antiquities or things of the past.wikipedia
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Sir Richard Hoare, 2nd Baronet

Richard Colt HoareSir Richard Colt HoareColt Hoare
The essence of antiquarianism is a focus on the empirical evidence of the past, and is perhaps best encapsulated in the motto adopted by the 18th-century antiquary Sir Richard Colt Hoare, "We speak from facts, not theory."
Sir Richard Colt Hoare, 2nd Baronet FRS (9 December 1758 – 19 May 1838) was an English antiquarian, archaeologist, artist, and traveller of the 18th and 19th centuries, the first major figure in the detailed study of the history of his home county of Wiltshire.

Antiquities

antiquity antiquities smugglingantiques
An antiquarian or antiquary (from the Latin: antiquarius, meaning pertaining to ancient times) is an aficionado or student of antiquities or things of the past.
A person who studies antiquities, as opposed to just collecting them, is often called an antiquarian.

Macrobius

Ambrosius Theodosius MacrobiusMacrobius Ambrosius TheodosiusAmbrosius Aurelius Theodosius Macrobius
Major antiquarian Latin writers with surviving works include Varro, Pliny the Elder, Aulus Gellius, and Macrobius.
He is primarily known for his writings, which include the widely copied and read Commentarii in Somnium Scipionis ("Commentary on the Dream of Scipio"), which was one of the most important sources for Platonism in the Latin West during the Middle Ages, the Saturnalia, a compendium of ancient Roman religious and antiquarian lore, and De differentiis et societatibus graeci latinique verbi ("On the Differences and Similarities of the Greek and Latin Verb"), which is now lost.

Deipnosophistae

DeipnosophistsThe DeipnosophistsSophists at Dinner
Roman-era Greek writers also dealt with antiquarian material, such as Plutarch in his Roman Questions and the Deipnosophistae of Athenaeus.
It is a long work of literary, historical, and antiquarian references set in Rome at a series of banquets held by the protagonist Publius Livius Larensis for an assembly of grammarians, lexicographers, jurists, musicians, and hangers-on.

History of archaeology

antiquarian and archaeologistantiquarian studiesAntiquarians
Despite the importance of antiquarian writing in the literature of ancient Rome, some scholars view antiquarianism as emerging only in the Middle Ages (see History of archaeology).
The 15th and 16th centuries saw the rise of antiquarians in Renaissance Europe who were interested in the collection of artifacts.

William Camden

CamdenBritanniaCamden's ''Britannia
The importance placed on lineage in early modern Europe meant that antiquarianism was often closely associated with genealogy, and a number of prominent antiquaries (including Robert Glover, William Camden, William Dugdale and Elias Ashmole) held office as professional heralds. Members included William Camden, Sir Robert Cotton, John Stow, William Lambarde, Richard Carew and others.
William Camden (2 May 1551 – 9 November 1623) was an English antiquarian, historian, topographer, and herald, best known as author of Britannia, the first chorographical survey of the islands of Great Britain and Ireland, and the Annales, the first detailed historical account of the reign of Elizabeth I of England.

Elias Ashmole

AshmoleAshmole, Elias
The importance placed on lineage in early modern Europe meant that antiquarianism was often closely associated with genealogy, and a number of prominent antiquaries (including Robert Glover, William Camden, William Dugdale and Elias Ashmole) held office as professional heralds.
Elias Ashmole (23 May 1617 – 18 May 1692) was an English antiquary, politician, officer of arms, astrologer and student of alchemy.

Aulus Gellius

GelliusNoctes AtticaeAttic Nights
Major antiquarian Latin writers with surviving works include Varro, Pliny the Elder, Aulus Gellius, and Macrobius.
He is famous for his Attic Nights, a commonplace book, or compilation of notes on grammar, philosophy, history, antiquarianism, and other subjects, preserving fragments of the works of many authors who might otherwise be unknown today.

Robert Glover (officer of arms)

Robert GloverGloverGlover, Robert
The importance placed on lineage in early modern Europe meant that antiquarianism was often closely associated with genealogy, and a number of prominent antiquaries (including Robert Glover, William Camden, William Dugdale and Elias Ashmole) held office as professional heralds.
Robert Glover (1544 – 10 April 1588) was an English Officer of Arms, genealogist and antiquarian in the reign of Elizabeth I.

Song dynasty

SongSouthern Song dynastyNorthern Song dynasty
During the Song Dynasty (960–1279), the scholar Ouyang Xiu (1007–1072) analyzed alleged ancient artifacts bearing archaic inscriptions in bronze and stone, which he preserved in a collection of some 400 rubbings.
People attended social clubs in large numbers; there were tea clubs, exotic food clubs, antiquarian and art collectors' clubs, horse-loving clubs, poetry clubs, and music clubs.

English county histories

county historycounty historiescounty historian
In England, some of the most important of these took the form of county histories.
English county histories, in other words historical and topographical (or "chorographical") works concerned with individual ancient counties of England, were produced by antiquarians from the late 16th century onwards.

Religion in ancient Rome

ancient Roman religionRoman religionRoman
Books on antiquarian topics covered such subjects as the origin of customs, religious rituals, and political institutions; genealogy; topography and landmarks; and etymology.
In his Fasti, a long-form poem covering Roman holidays from January to June, Ovid presents a unique look at Roman antiquarian lore, popular customs, and religious practice that is by turns imaginative, entertaining, high-minded, and scurrilous; not a priestly account, despite the speaker's pose as a vates or inspired poet-prophet, but a work of description, imagination and poetic etymology that reflects the broad humor and burlesque spirit of such venerable festivals as the Saturnalia, Consualia, and feast of Anna Perenna on the Ides of March, where Ovid treats the assassination of the newly deified Julius Caesar as utterly incidental to the festivities among the Roman people.

Archaeology

archaeologistarchaeologicalarchaeologists
The Oxford English Dictionary first cites "archaeologist" from 1824; this soon took over as the usual term for one major branch of antiquarian activity. By the end of the 19th century, antiquarianism had diverged into a number of more specialized academic disciplines including archaeology, art history, numismatics, sigillography, philology, literary studies and diplomatics.
Archaeology developed out of antiquarianism in Europe during the 19th century, and has since become a discipline practiced across the world.

Horace Walpole

Horace Walpole, 4th Earl of OrfordWalpoleHorace
The connoisseur Horace Walpole, who shared many of the antiquaries' interests, was nonetheless emphatic in his insistence that the study of cultural relics should be selective and informed by taste and aesthetics.
Horatio Walpole, 4th Earl of Orford (24 September 1717 – 2 March 1797), also known as Horace Walpole, was an English writer, art historian, man of letters, antiquarian and Whig politician.

The Antiquary

Douster-SwivelLuckie Mucklebackit
The antiquary was satirised in John Earle's Micro-cosmographie of 1628 ("Hee is one that hath that unnaturall disease to bee enamour'd of old age, and wrinkles, and loves all things (as Dutchmen doe Cheese) the better for being mouldy and worme-eaten"), in Jean-Siméon Chardin's painting Le Singe Antiquaire (c.1726), in Sir Walter Scott's novel The Antiquary (1816), in the caricatures of Thomas Rowlandson, and in many other places.
The Antiquary (1816) is a novel by Sir Walter Scott about several characters including an antiquary: an amateur historian, archaeologist and collector of items of dubious antiquity.

John Stow

StowSurvey of LondonA Survey of London
Members included William Camden, Sir Robert Cotton, John Stow, William Lambarde, Richard Carew and others.
John Stow (also Stowe; 1524/25 – 5 April 1605) was an English historian and antiquarian.

William Lambarde

LambardeWilliam LambardLambard
Members included William Camden, Sir Robert Cotton, John Stow, William Lambarde, Richard Carew and others.
William Lambarde (18 October 1536 – 19 August 1601) was an English antiquarian, writer on legal subjects, and politician.

Sir Robert Cotton, 1st Baronet, of Connington

Sir Robert CottonRobert Bruce CottonRobert Cotton
Members included William Camden, Sir Robert Cotton, John Stow, William Lambarde, Richard Carew and others.
Sir Robert Bruce Cotton, 1st Baronet (22 January 1570/1 – 6 May 1631) of Conington Hall in the parish of Conington in Huntingdonshire, England, was a Member of Parliament and an antiquarian who founded the Cotton library.

Sigillography

sigillographicsphragisticssigillographer
By the end of the 19th century, antiquarianism had diverged into a number of more specialized academic disciplines including archaeology, art history, numismatics, sigillography, philology, literary studies and diplomatics.
Antiquaries such as Thomas Elmham and John Rous began to record and to discuss the historic use of seals in the 15th century.

Cotton library

CottonCottonian LibraryCotton library fire
Papers read at their meetings are preserved in Cotton's collections, and were printed by Thomas Hearne in 1720 under the title A Collection of Curious Discourses, a second edition appearing in 1771.
The Cotton or Cottonian library is a collection of manuscripts once owned by Sir Robert Bruce Cotton MP (1571–1631), an antiquarian and bibliophile.

Chorography

chorographicalchorographicchorographer
Many early modern antiquaries were also chorographers: that is to say, they recorded landscapes and monuments within regional or national descriptions.
Camden's Britannia was predominantly concerned with the history and antiquities of Britain, and, probably as a result, the term chorography in English came to be particularly associated with antiquarian texts.

Thomas Hearne (antiquarian)

Thomas HearneHearne
Papers read at their meetings are preserved in Cotton's collections, and were printed by Thomas Hearne in 1720 under the title A Collection of Curious Discourses, a second edition appearing in 1771.
Thomas Hearne or Hearn (July 1678 – 10 June 1735) was an English diarist and prolific antiquary, particularly remembered for his published editions of many medieval English chronicles and other important historical texts.

British Museum

The British MuseumBritish Museum PressBrit. Mus.
The society was governed by a council of twenty and a president who is ex officio a trustee of the British Museum.
The addition of the Cotton and Harley manuscripts introduced a literary and antiquarian element and meant that the British Museum now became both National Museum and library.

Richard Carew (antiquary)

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Members included William Camden, Sir Robert Cotton, John Stow, William Lambarde, Richard Carew and others.
Richard Carew (17 July 1555 – 6 November 1620) was a Cornish translator and antiquary.

Society of Antiquaries of Scotland

FSA ScotFSA (Scot)FSA(Scot)
The Society of Antiquaries of Scotland is the senior antiquarian body of Scotland, with its headquarters in the National Museum of Scotland, Chambers Street, Edinburgh.