Antiquarian

Ole Worm's cabinet of curiosities, from Museum Wormianum, 1655
"Antiquaries": portraits of 20 influential antiquaries and historians published in Crabb's Universal Historical Dictionary (1825). Featured are: Giraldus Cambrensis, John Leland, Guido Panciroli, John Stow, William Camden, Justus Lipsius, Joseph Justus Scaliger, Johannes Meursius, Hubert Goltzius, Henry Spelman, Charles Patin, Philipp Clüver, William Dugdale, Claudius Salmasius, Friedrich Spanheim, Johann Georg Graevius, Jakob Gronovius, Thomas Hearne, John Strype, and Elias Ashmole.
William Camden (1551–1623), author of the Britannia, wearing the tabard and chain of office of Clarenceux King of Arms. Originally published in the 1695 edition of Britannia.
Pit Mead Roman villa mosaic, illustrations by Catherine Downes, engraved by James Basire and presented to the SAL by Daines Barrington
The Puzzle (1756): etching by John Bowles. In one variation on a recurrent joke, four antiquaries struggle to decipher what seems to be an ancient inscription, but which is in fact a crude memorial in English to Claud Coster, tripe-seller, and his wife. The print is ironically dedicated to "the Penetrating Genius's of Oxford, Cambridge, Eaton, Westminster, and the Learned Society of Antiquarians".
Le Singe Antiquaire (c. 1726) by Jean-Siméon Chardin
Thomas Rowlandson's caricature, Death and the Antiquaries, 1816. A group of antiquaries cluster eagerly around the exhumed corpse of a king, oblivious to the jealous figure of Death aiming his dart at one of them. The image was inspired by the opening of the tomb of Edward I in Westminster Abbey by the Society of Antiquaries in 1774.
The entrance to the premises of the Society of Antiquaries of London, at Burlington House, Piccadilly.

Aficionado or student of antiquities or things of the past.

- Antiquarian
Ole Worm's cabinet of curiosities, from Museum Wormianum, 1655

64 related topics

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Restoring the frame of an antique mirror

Antique

Item perceived as having value because of its aesthetic or historical significance, and often defined as at least 100 years old (or some other limit), although the term is often used loosely to describe any object that is old.

Item perceived as having value because of its aesthetic or historical significance, and often defined as at least 100 years old (or some other limit), although the term is often used loosely to describe any object that is old.

Restoring the frame of an antique mirror
An antique map
A vintage travel gear seller at Marché Dauphine, Saint-Ouen, Paris
Furniture antiques from the Chinese Liao dynasty

An antiquarian is a person who collects and studies antiquities or things of the past.

Laocoön and His Sons, Greek sculpture from the 1st century BCE, Vatican Museums. Excavated in Rome in 1506.

History of archaeology

Study of human activity in the past, primarily through the recovery and analysis of the material culture and environmental data that they have left behind, which includes artifacts, architecture, biofacts and cultural landscapes (the archaeological record).

Study of human activity in the past, primarily through the recovery and analysis of the material culture and environmental data that they have left behind, which includes artifacts, architecture, biofacts and cultural landscapes (the archaeological record).

Laocoön and His Sons, Greek sculpture from the 1st century BCE, Vatican Museums. Excavated in Rome in 1506.
An early photograph of Stonehenge taken July 1877
Pompeii and Mt. Vesuvius in 1900
The Egyptian Expedition under the Orders of Bonaparte, painting by Léon Cogniet
Artefacts discovered at the 1808 Bush Barrow excavation by Sir Richard Colt Hoare and William Cunnington.
One of Flinders Petrie's most significant find — the Merneptah Stele. This is an 1897 mirror image copy of the main part of the inscription (all 28 lines).
Sophia Schliemann (née Engastromenos), the wife of the archaeologist Heinrich Schliemann, wearing treasures recovered at Hisarlik.
Laocoön and His Sons, Greek sculpture from the 1st century BCE, Vatican Museums. Excavated in Rome in 1506.

The 15th and 16th centuries saw the rise of antiquarians in Renaissance Europe such as Flavio Biondo who were interested in the collection of artifacts.

Richard Carew, High Sheriff and Deputy-Lieutenant of Cornwall, in 1586

Richard Carew (antiquary)

Richard Carew, High Sheriff and Deputy-Lieutenant of Cornwall, in 1586

Richard Carew (17 July 1555 – 6 November 1620) was a Cornish translator and antiquary.

Ole Worm's cabinet of curiosities, from Museum Wormianum, 1655

Arthur Agarde

Ole Worm's cabinet of curiosities, from Museum Wormianum, 1655

Arthur Agarde or Agard (1540 – August 1615) was an English antiquary and archivist in the Exchequer at Westminster.

A 16th- or 17th-century portrait of Lambarde by an unidentified artist

William Lambarde

A 16th- or 17th-century portrait of Lambarde by an unidentified artist
Title page of the first authorized edition of Lambarde's Archeion (1635)

William Lambarde (18 October 1536 – 19 August 1601) was an English antiquarian, writer on legal subjects, and politician.

19th-century drawings of the seal of Richard de Clare ("Strongbow"), Earl of Pembroke (1130–1176)

Sigillography

Scholarly discipline that studies the wax, lead, clay, and other seals used to authenticate archival documents.

Scholarly discipline that studies the wax, lead, clay, and other seals used to authenticate archival documents.

19th-century drawings of the seal of Richard de Clare ("Strongbow"), Earl of Pembroke (1130–1176)
Title page of Olivier de Wree's Sigilla comitum Flandriae (1639)

Antiquaries such as Thomas Elmham and John Rous began to record and to discuss the historic use of seals in the 15th century.

A centaur struggling with a Lapith on a metope from the Parthenon, in the British Museum (London), part of the Elgin Marbles

Antiquities

Antiquities are objects from antiquity, especially the civilizations of the Mediterranean: the Classical antiquity of Greece and Rome, Ancient Egypt and the other Ancient Near Eastern cultures.

Antiquities are objects from antiquity, especially the civilizations of the Mediterranean: the Classical antiquity of Greece and Rome, Ancient Egypt and the other Ancient Near Eastern cultures.

A centaur struggling with a Lapith on a metope from the Parthenon, in the British Museum (London), part of the Elgin Marbles
An Assyrian lamassu in the Louvre
Chinese ritual wine server (guang), circa 1100 BC
Allegories of five literatures of antiquity, relief at Cardiff Castle, by Thomas Nicholls circa 1870
The Euphronios Krater has been returned to Italy by the Metropolitan Museum

A person who studies antiquities, as opposed to just collecting them, is often called an antiquarian.

William Collings Lukis (1817-1892)

William Collings Lukis

William Collings Lukis (1817-1892)

Rev. William Collings Lukis MA. FSA (8 April 1817 in Guernsey – 7 December 1892 in Wath, North Riding of Yorkshire) was a British antiquarian, archeologist and polymath.

A portrait of Lysons from the collection of the Gloucester City Museum & Art Gallery

Daniel Lysons (antiquarian)

A portrait of Lysons from the collection of the Gloucester City Museum & Art Gallery

Daniel Lysons (1762–1834) was an English antiquarian and topographer, who published, amongst other works, the four-volume Environs of London (1792–96).

Samuel Lysons,
by Thomas Lawrence.

Samuel Lysons

Samuel Lysons,
by Thomas Lawrence.
Samuel Lysons' drawing of the Orpheus mosaic at Woodchester (detail)

Samuel Lysons (1763 – June 1819) was an English antiquarian and engraver who, together with his elder brother Daniel Lysons (1762–1834), published several works on antiquarian topics.