Antiquities Act

Antiquities Act of 1906American Antiquities Actpresidential proclamation1906 Antiquities ActAct for the Preservation of American AntiquitiesAmerican Antiquities Act of 1906An Act for the Preservation of American AntiquitiesFederal Antiquities Act of 1906Federal lawPreservation of American Antiquities Act
The Antiquities Act of 1906, is an act that was passed by the United States Congress and signed into law by Theodore Roosevelt on June 8, 1906.wikipedia
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Edgar Lee Hewett

Edgar L. HewettEdgar Hewett
In 1902, Iowa Congressman John F. Lacey, who chaired the House Committee on the Public Lands, traveled to the Southwest with the rising anthropologist Edgar Lee Hewett, to see for himself the extent of the pot hunters' impact.
He is best known for his role in gaining passage of the Antiquities Act, a pioneering piece of legislation for the conservation movement; as the founder and first director of the Museum of New Mexico; and as the first president of the New Mexico Normal School, now New Mexico Highlands University.

Theodore Roosevelt

Teddy RooseveltPresident Theodore RooseveltRoosevelt
The Antiquities Act of 1906, is an act that was passed by the United States Congress and signed into law by Theodore Roosevelt on June 8, 1906.
Nonetheless, Roosevelt established the United States Forest Service, signed into law the creation of five National Parks, and signed the 1906 Antiquities Act, under which he proclaimed 18 new U.S. National Monuments.

National monument (United States)

National MonumentU.S. National Monumentnational monuments
This law gives the President of the United States the authority to, by presidential proclamation, create national monuments from federal lands to protect significant natural, cultural, or scientific features.
National monuments can be so designated through the power of the Antiquities Act of 1906.

Public land

public landsstate landpublic
This law gives the President of the United States the authority to, by presidential proclamation, create national monuments from federal lands to protect significant natural, cultural, or scientific features.
In general, Congress must legislate the creation or acquisition of new public lands, such as national parks; however, under the 1906 Antiquities Act, also known as the National Monuments Act, the President may designate new national monuments without congressional authorization if the monument is on federally-owned land.

Chaco Culture National Historical Park

Chaco CanyonChacoanChaco
The act resulted from concerns about protecting mostly prehistoric Native American ruins and artifacts--collectively termed "antiquities"--on federal lands in the West, such as at Chaco Canyon, New Mexico.
Hewett and others helped enact the Federal Antiquities Act of 1906, the first U.S. law to protect relics; it was, in effect, a direct consequence of Wetherill's controversial activities at Chaco.

Grand Teton National Park

Grand TetonJackson Hole National MonumentTeton National Park
The 1950 law that incorporated Jackson Hole into an enlarged Grand Teton National Park also amended the Antiquities Act, requiring Congressional consent for any future creation or enlargement of National Monuments in Wyoming.
Secretary Ickes recommended to President Franklin Roosevelt that the Antiquities Act, which permitted Presidents to set aside land for protection without the approval of Congress, be used to establish a national monument in Jackson Hole.

List of national monuments of the United States

national monumentsnational monumentU.S. National Monument
The president's authority arises from the Antiquities Act of 1906, which authorizes the president to proclaim "historic landmarks, historic and prehistoric structures, and other objects of historic or scientific interest" as national monuments.

John F. Lacey

John Fletcher LaceyLacey Act of 1894
In 1902, Iowa Congressman John F. Lacey, who chaired the House Committee on the Public Lands, traveled to the Southwest with the rising anthropologist Edgar Lee Hewett, to see for himself the extent of the pot hunters' impact.
Lacey is also significant in the history of the conservation movement for his role in writing (with the help of anthropologist Edgar Lee Hewett) and enacting the Antiquities Act.

National Park Service

U.S. National Park ServiceNational Park SystemUnited States National Park Service
Although all units of the National Park System in the United States are the responsibility of a single agency, they are all managed under individual pieces of authorizing legislation or, in the case of national monuments created under the Antiquities Act, presidential proclamation.

Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument

Hawaiian Islands National Wildlife RefugePapahanaumokuakea Marine National MonumentNorthwestern Hawaiian Islands National Monument
At 583000 sqmi, Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument is the largest protected area proclaimed.
On June 15, 2006, Bush signed Proclamation 8031, designating the waters of the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands a national monument under the 1906 Antiquities Act.

Jackson Hole National Monument

The first time followed the unpopular proclamation of Jackson Hole National Monument in 1943.
As a concession to local opposition, the law adding Jackson Hole to Grand Teton also modified the Antiquities Act, limiting the future power of a president to proclaim National Monuments in Wyoming.

Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act

Alaska Lands ActANILCAa controversial land bill
The Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act requires Congressional ratification of the use of the Antiquities Act in Alaska for withdrawals of greater than 5,000 acre.
President Carter used the Antiquities Act to designate 56 million acres as National Monuments by executive order on December 1, 1978.

Winters v. United States

Cappaert v. United StatesIndigenous rights to land along riversCappaert vs. U.S.
Devils Hole cavern in Nevada became a detached part of Death Valley National Monument in 1952, by a proclamation of President Harry S. Truman made under the Antiquities Act.

Act of Congress

Public LawactActs of Congress
The Antiquities Act of 1906, is an act that was passed by the United States Congress and signed into law by Theodore Roosevelt on June 8, 1906.

United States Congress

CongressU.S. CongressCongressional
The Antiquities Act of 1906, is an act that was passed by the United States Congress and signed into law by Theodore Roosevelt on June 8, 1906.

Presidential proclamation (United States)

presidential proclamationproclamationpresidential proclamations
This law gives the President of the United States the authority to, by presidential proclamation, create national monuments from federal lands to protect significant natural, cultural, or scientific features.

Antiquities

antiquity antiquities smugglingantiques
The act resulted from concerns about protecting mostly prehistoric Native American ruins and artifacts--collectively termed "antiquities"--on federal lands in the West, such as at Chaco Canyon, New Mexico.

Iowa

IAState of IowaNorthern Iowa
In 1902, Iowa Congressman John F. Lacey, who chaired the House Committee on the Public Lands, traveled to the Southwest with the rising anthropologist Edgar Lee Hewett, to see for himself the extent of the pot hunters' impact.

Anthropology

anthropologistanthropologicalanthropologists
In 1902, Iowa Congressman John F. Lacey, who chaired the House Committee on the Public Lands, traveled to the Southwest with the rising anthropologist Edgar Lee Hewett, to see for himself the extent of the pot hunters' impact.

National park

national parksnationalNP
With this act, this can be done much more quickly than going through the Congressional process of creating a National Park.

Supreme Court of the United States

United States Supreme CourtU.S. Supreme CourtSupreme Court
The United States Supreme Court has repeatedly upheld presidential proclamations under the Antiquities Act, ruling each time that the Act gives the president nearly-unfettered discretion as to the nature of the object to be protected and the size of the area reserved.

Devils Tower

Devils Tower National MonumentDevil's TowerDevils Tower, Wyoming
The first use of the Act protected a large geographic feature – President Theodore Roosevelt proclaimed Devils Tower National Monument on September 24, 1906.

Grand Canyon National Park

Grand CanyonNorth RimGrand Canyon National Monument
President Roosevelt also used it to create the Grand Canyon National Monument (now Grand Canyon National Park).

Father Millet Cross

Father Millet Cross National Monumentcross in his honorerected a cross
The smallest, Father Millet Cross National Monument (now part of a state park), was a mere 0.0074 acre.

Wyoming

WYState of WyomingWyoming, USA
The 1950 law that incorporated Jackson Hole into an enlarged Grand Teton National Park also amended the Antiquities Act, requiring Congressional consent for any future creation or enlargement of National Monuments in Wyoming.