Antonín Dvořákwikipedia
Antonín Leopold Dvořák (8 September 1841 – 1 May 1904) was a Czech composer.
DvořákAntonín DvořákDvorakDvorákAntonin DvořákDvořakDvořák, AntonínAnton DvorakA. DvořákAntonin Dvorak

Moravian traditional music

MoraviaMoravian folk melodiesMoravian
Following Smetana's nationalist example, Dvořák frequently employed aspects, specifically rhythms, of the folk music of Moravia and his native Bohemia.
Moravian traditional music influenced Czech classical composers, such as Antonín Dvořák, Bedřich Smetana and Leoš Janáček, who was at the forefront of the Moravian folklore movement.

Slavonic Dances

Slavonic Dance No. 2Slavonic DanceSlavonic Dances
Brahms recommended Dvořák to his publisher, Simrock, who soon afterward commissioned what became the Slavonic Dances, Op. 46. These were highly praised by the Berlin music critic Louis Ehlert in 1878, the sheet music (of the original piano 4-hands version) had excellent sales, and Dvořák's international reputation was launched at last.
The Slavonic Dances (Slovanské tance) are a series of 16 orchestral pieces composed by Antonín Dvořák in 1878 and 1886 and published in two sets as Op. 46 and Op. 72 respectively.

Symphony No. 7 (Dvořák)

Symphony No. 7Symphony No. 7 in D minorSeventh Symphony
His Seventh Symphony was written for London.
Antonín Dvořák's Symphony No. 7 in D minor, Op. 70, B. 141, was completed on 17 March 1885 and first performed on 22 April 1885 at St James's Hall in London.

Cello Concerto (Dvořák)

Cello ConcertoCello Concerto in B minorConcerto
While in the United States, Dvořák wrote his two most successful orchestral works: the Symphony From the New World, which spread his reputation worldwide, and his Cello Concerto, one of the most highly regarded of all cello concerti.
The Cello Concerto in B minor, Op. 104, B. 191, is the last solo concerto by Antonín Dvořák.

Symphony No. 1 (Dvořák)

Symphony No. 1First SymphonyC minor symphony
The first public performances of his works were in Prague in 1872 and, with special success, in 1873, when he was aged 31. Seeking recognition beyond the Prague area, he submitted a score of his First Symphony to a prize competition in Germany, but did not win, and the unreturned manuscript was lost until rediscovered many decades later.
The Symphony No. 1 in C minor, B. 9, subtitled The Bells of Zlonice (Zlonické zvony), was composed by Antonín Dvořák during February and March 1865.

Rusalka (opera)

RusalkaRusalka'' (opera)Song to the Moon
By far the most successful of the operas is Rusalka.
Rusalka, Op. 114, is an opera ('lyric fairy tale') by Antonín Dvořák.

Prague Conservatory

Prague ConservatoireConservatoirePrague Conservatory
In 1891 Dvořák was appointed as a professor at the Prague Conservatory.
In 1891, Antonín Dvořák joined the faculty as the head of the composition department.

Bedřich Smetana

SmetanaBedřich SmetanaSmetana, Bedřich
After Bedřich Smetana, he was the next Czech Romantic-era composer to achieve worldwide recognition.
However, relatively few of Smetana's works are in the international repertory, and most foreign commentators tend to regard Antonín Dvořák as a more significant Czech composer.

Symphony No. 9 (Dvořák)

Symphony No. 9New World SymphonyFrom the New World
While in the United States, Dvořák wrote his two most successful orchestral works: the Symphony From the New World, which spread his reputation worldwide, and his Cello Concerto, one of the most highly regarded of all cello concerti.
The Symphony No. 9 in E minor, "From the New World", Op. 95, B. 178 („Z nového světa“), popularly known as the New World Symphony, was composed by Antonín Dvořák in 1893 while he was the director of the National Conservatory of Music of America from 1892 to 1895.

Songs My Mother Taught Me (Dvořák)

Songs My Mother Taught MeSongs My Mother Taught Me" (Dvořák)Když mne stará matka spívat
Among his smaller works, the seventh Humoresque and the song "Songs My Mother Taught Me" are also widely performed and recorded.
"Songs My Mother Taught Me" (Když mne stará matka zpívat učívala; Als die alte Mutter sang) is a song for voice and piano written in 1880 by Antonín Dvořák.

Stabat Mater (Dvořák)

Stabat MaterDvorak's Stabat Mater(1876–77)
Dvořák's first piece of a religious nature, his setting of Stabat Mater, was premiered in Prague in 1880.
Stabat Mater (Op. 58, originally Op. 28, B. 71) for soli, choir and orchestra is a religious cantata by the Czech composer Antonín Dvořák based on the text of the Stabat Mater.

String Quartet No. 12 (Dvořák)

String Quartet No. 12AmericanAmerican String Quartet
He also wrote his most appreciated piece of chamber music, the American String Quartet, during this time.
The String Quartet in F major, Op. 96, nicknamed the American Quartet, is the 12th string quartet composed by Antonín Dvořák.

Symphonic Variations (Dvořák)

Symphonic VariationsSymphonic Variations on an Original Theme
In 1877 he wrote the "Symphonic Variations" and Ludevít Procházka conducted its premiere in Prague.
Antonín Dvořák's Symphonic Variations on the Theme “I am a fiddler” (Symfonické variace z písně „Já jsem huslař“) for orchestra, Op. 78, B. 70, were written in 1877.

Folk music

folkfolk musicfolk song
Following Smetana's nationalist example, Dvořák frequently employed aspects, specifically rhythms, of the folk music of Moravia and his native Bohemia.
Nationalist composers emerged in Central Europe, Russia, Scandinavia, Spain and Britain: the music of Dvořák, Smetana, Grieg, Rimsky-Korsakov, Brahms, Liszt, de Falla, Wagner, Sibelius, Vaughan Williams, Bartók, and many others drew upon folk melodies.

Serenade for Strings (Dvořák)

Serenade for Strings in E majorSerenade for Strings in ESerenade for String Orchestra
In 1875, the year his first son was born, Dvořák composed his second string quintet, his 5th Symphony, Piano Trio No. 1, and Serenade for Strings in E.
Antonín Dvořák's Serenade for Strings in E major (Smyčcová serenáda E dur), Op. 22, was composed in just two weeks in May 1875.

String Quintet No. 2 (Dvořák)

String Quintet No. 2 in G majorsecond string quintetDvořák
In 1875, the year his first son was born, Dvořák composed his second string quintet, his 5th Symphony, Piano Trio No. 1, and Serenade for Strings in E.
Antonín Dvořák's String Quintet No. 2 in G major, Op. 77 (B. 49), was originally composed in early March 1875 and first performed on March 18, 1876 in Prague at the concert of the Umělecká beseda.

Symphony No. 6 (Dvořák)

Symphony No. 6Symphony No. 6 in D majorsixth symphony
Hans Richter asked Dvořák to compose his Symphony No. 6 for the Vienna Philharmonic, intending to premiere it in December 1880.
Czech composer Antonín Dvořák (1841–1904) composed his Symphony No. 6 in D major, Op. 60, B. 112, in 1880.

Adolf Čech

Adolf Čech therefore conducted the premiere of the symphony at a concert of the Philharmonia society (in Czech: spolek Filharmonie, predecessor of the Czech Philharmonic) on 25 March 1881, in Prague.
Adolf Čech (11 December 184127 December 1903) was a Czech conductor, who premiered a number of significant works by Antonín Dvořák (the 2nd, 5th and 6th symphonies, more than any other conductor; other important orchestral works, four operas, the Stabat Mater), Bedřich Smetana (Má vlast, five operas), Zdeněk Fibich (two operas) and other Czech composers.

String Quartet No. 1 (Dvořák)

First String QuartetString Quartet No. 1 in A majorString Quartet No. 1
Dvořák called his String Quintet in A Minor (1861) his Opus 1, and his First String Quartet (1862) his Opus 2, although the chronological Burghauser Catalogue numbers these as B.6 and B.7, showing five earlier compositions without opus numbers.
Antonín Dvořák finished the composition of his String Quartet No. 1 in A major, Op. 2, (B. 8), one of his earliest chamber works, in March 1862.

Humoresques (Dvořák)

HumoresqueHumoresquesHumoresque No. 7
Among his smaller works, the seventh Humoresque and the song "Songs My Mother Taught Me" are also widely performed and recorded.
187), is a piano cycle by the Czech composer Antonín Dvořák, written during the summer of 1894.

Violin Concerto (Dvořák)

Violin ConcertoViolin Concerto in A minorViolin Concerto in A minor, Op. 53
In that same year, Dvořák also wrote his Violin Concerto.
The Violin Concerto in A minor, Op. 53 (B.108), is a concerto for violin and orchestra composed by Antonín Dvořák in 1879.

King and Charcoal Burner

The King and the Charcoal BurnerKing''' and Charcoal Burner
The opera The King and the Charcoal Burner was returned to Dvořák from the Provisional Theatre and said to be unperformable.
King and Charcoal Burner (Král a uhlíř), Op. 14, is a three-act (23-scene) comic opera by the Czech composer Antonín Dvořák.

String Sextet (Dvořák)

String SextetString Sextet in A major, Op. 48, B. 80String Sextet in A major
In 1879 Dvořák wrote his String Sextet.
Antonín Dvořák´s String Sextet in A major, Op.

Piano Concerto (Dvořák)

Piano Concerto in G minorPiano ConcertoPiano Concerto in G minor, Op. 33
Dvořák entered the Austrian Prize competition again in 1877, submitting his Moravian Duets and other music, possibly his Piano Concerto.
The Concerto for Piano and Orchestra in G minor, Op. 33, is the only piano concerto by Czech composer Antonín Dvořák.

Requiem (Dvořák)

RequiemDvořákRequiem in B-flat minor
Dvořák's Requiem was premiered later that year in Birmingham at the Triennial Music Festival.
Antonín Dvořák's Requiem in B minor, Op. 89, B. 165, is a funeral Mass for soloists, choir and orchestra.