Antonie van Leeuwenhoek

Anton van LeeuwenhoekAntoni van LeeuwenhoekLeeuwenhoekAntony van LeeuwenhoekVan LeeuwenhoekAnthonie van LeeuwenhoekAnthony van LeeuwenhoekAntoine van LeeuwenhoekAnthony LeeuwenhoekAnton Leeuenhoek
Antonie Philips van Leeuwenhoek (, ; 24 October 1632 – 26 August 1723) was a Dutch businessman and scientist in the Golden Age of Dutch science and technology.wikipedia
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List of people considered father or mother of a scientific field

progenitorfather of modern chemistryfather
A largely self-taught man in science, he is commonly known as "the Father of Microbiology", and one of the first microscopists and microbiologists.

Dutch Republic

United ProvincesDutchNetherlands
Antonie Philips van Leeuwenhoek (, ; 24 October 1632 – 26 August 1723) was a Dutch businessman and scientist in the Golden Age of Dutch science and technology. Raised in Delft, Dutch Republic, van Leeuwenhoek worked as a draper in his youth and founded his own shop in 1654.
The small republic of around 1.5 million inhabitants distinguished itself by world trade through the Dutch East India Company (VOC) and the Dutch West India Company (WIC), by its great military successes against ostensibly stronger countries such as Spain and England, by its huge fleet (with 2,000 ships, larger than that of England and France combined), by the flourishing of arts (painters such as Rembrandt, Johannes Vermeer and many others) and sciences (including Hugo Grotius and Antonie van Leeuwenhoek), and by its relatively tolerant atmosphere towards different religions and ideas (freedom of thought).

Delft

Delft ExplosionDelft, NetherlandsDelft, The Netherlands
Raised in Delft, Dutch Republic, van Leeuwenhoek worked as a draper in his youth and founded his own shop in 1654.
In terms of science and technology, thanks to the pioneering contributions of Antonie van Leeuwenhoek and Martinus Beijerinck, Delft can be considered to be the true birthplace of microbiology, with its several sub-disciplines such as bacteriology, protozoology, and virology.

Spermatozoon

spermatozoaspermsperm cells
He was also the first to document microscopic observations of muscle fibers, bacteria, spermatozoa, red blood cells, crystals in gouty tophi, and blood flow in capillaries.
Sperm cells were first observed in Antonie van Leeuwenhoek's laboratory in 1677.

William Davidson of Curriehill

Davidson of CurriehillWilliam Davidson
At the age of 16 he became a bookkeeper's apprentice at a linen-draper's shop in Amsterdam, which was owned by the Scot William Davidson.
In 1648 he appointed Anthony van Leeuwenhoek as an assistant.

List of microscopists

microscopistmicroscopists
A largely self-taught man in science, he is commonly known as "the Father of Microbiology", and one of the first microscopists and microbiologists.

Draper

linen draperdraperswoollendraper
Raised in Delft, Dutch Republic, van Leeuwenhoek worked as a draper in his youth and founded his own shop in 1654.

Dutch Golden Age

Golden AgeDutch styleGolden Age of Dutch science and technology
Antonie Philips van Leeuwenhoek (, ; 24 October 1632 – 26 August 1723) was a Dutch businessman and scientist in the Golden Age of Dutch science and technology.
The most famous Dutch scientist in the area of optics is Anton van Leeuwenhoek, who was the first to methodically study microscopic life—he was the first person to describe bacteria—thus laying the foundations for the field of microbiology.

The Astronomer (Vermeer)

The AstronomerThe Astronomer (painting)
It has been suggested that he is the man portrayed in two Vermeer paintings of the late 1660s, The Astronomer and The Geographer, but others argue that there appears to be little physical similarity.
Both are believed to portray the same man, possibly Antonie van Leeuwenhoek.

Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz

LeibnizGottfried LeibnizGottfried Wilhelm von Leibniz
Van Leeuwenhoek was visited by Leibniz, William III of Orange and his wife, Mary II of England, and the burgemeester (mayor) Johan Huydecoper of Amsterdam, the latter being very interested in collecting and growing plants for the Hortus Botanicus Amsterdam, and all gazed at the tiny creatures.
On the journey from London to Hanover, Leibniz stopped in The Hague where he met van Leeuwenhoek, the discoverer of microorganisms.

Johannes Vermeer

VermeerJan VermeerVermeer, Johannes
Van Leeuwenhoek was a contemporary of another famous Delft citizen, the painter Johannes Vermeer, who was baptized just four days earlier.
Dutch microscopist Antonie van Leeuwenhoek, who worked for the city council as a surveyor, was appointed trustee.

The Geographer

It has been suggested that he is the man portrayed in two Vermeer paintings of the late 1660s, The Astronomer and The Geographer, but others argue that there appears to be little physical similarity.
Wheelock and others assert the model/source was probably Anthonie van Leeuwenhoek (1632-1723), a contemporary of Vermeer who was also born in Delft.

Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society

Philosophical TransactionsTransactions of the Royal SocietyPhilosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London
When the Royal Society in London published the groundbreaking work of an Italian lensmaker in their journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, de Graaf wrote to the editor of the journal, Henry Oldenburg, with a ringing endorsement of van Leeuwenhoek's microscopes which, he claimed, "far surpass those which we have hitherto seen".

Bacteria

bacteriumbacterialEubacteria
He was also the first to document microscopic observations of muscle fibers, bacteria, spermatozoa, red blood cells, crystals in gouty tophi, and blood flow in capillaries.
Bacteria were first observed by the Dutch microscopist Antonie van Leeuwenhoek in 1676, using a single-lens microscope of his own design.

Warmond

He attended school in Warmond for a short time before being sent to live in Benthuizen with his uncle, an attorney.
Antonie van Leeuwenhoek, commonly known as "the Father of Microbiology", and considered to be the first microbiologist, was schooled in Warmond.

Brian J. Ford

Brian J FordFord, Brian J.
In 1981, the British microscopist Brian J. Ford found that van Leeuwenhoek's original specimens had survived in the collections of the Royal Society of London.
One of his best known discoveries is the original specimens of Antony van Leeuwenhoek.

De Grootste Nederlander

100 greatest Dutch people40th greatest citizen of all timegreatest Dutchman
In 2004, a public poll in the Netherlands to determine the greatest Dutchman ("De Grootste Nederlander") named van Leeuwenhoek the 4th-greatest Dutchman of all time.

Leeuwenhoek Lecture

The Leeuwenhoek Medal, Leeuwenhoek Lecture, Leeuwenhoek (crater), Leeuwenhoeckia, Levenhookia (a genus in the family Stylidiaceae), and Leeuwenhoekiella (an aerobic bacterial genus) are named after him.
The prize is named after the Dutch microscopist Antonie van Leeuwenhoek and was instituted in 1948 from a bequest from George Gabb.

Nicolaas Hartsoeker

HartsoekerHartsoeker, NicolaasNicolas Hartsoeker
Like Robert Boyle and Nicolaas Hartsoeker, van Leeuwenhoek was interested in dried cochineal, trying to find out if the dye came from a berry or an insect.
Nicolaas started to make a living as a lens maker in Rotterdam, and was instructed in optics by Antonie van Leeuwenhoek.

Red blood cell

red blood cellserythrocyteserythroid
He was also the first to document microscopic observations of muscle fibers, bacteria, spermatozoa, red blood cells, crystals in gouty tophi, and blood flow in capillaries.
Unaware of this work, Anton van Leeuwenhoek provided another microscopic description in 1674, this time providing a more precise description of red blood cells, even approximating their size, "25,000 times smaller than a fine grain of sand".

Joan Huydecoper II

Joan HuydecoperJoan Huydecoper van MaarsseveenJohan Huydecoper van Maarsseveen
Van Leeuwenhoek was visited by Leibniz, William III of Orange and his wife, Mary II of England, and the burgemeester (mayor) Johan Huydecoper of Amsterdam, the latter being very interested in collecting and growing plants for the Hortus Botanicus Amsterdam, and all gazed at the tiny creatures.
He did visit Antonie van Leeuwenhoek in Delft, and looked through his microscope at tiny creatures.

Leeuwenhoek Medal

The Leeuwenhoek Medal, Leeuwenhoek Lecture, Leeuwenhoek (crater), Leeuwenhoeckia, Levenhookia (a genus in the family Stylidiaceae), and Leeuwenhoekiella (an aerobic bacterial genus) are named after him.
The Leeuwenhoek Medal, established in 1877 by the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences, (KNAW), in honor of the 17th- and 18th-century microscopist Antoni van Leeuwenhoek, is granted every ten years to the scientist judged to have made the most significant contribution to microbiology during the preceding decade.

Protist

ProtistaprotistsProtoctista
Among the pioneers in the study of the protists, which were almost ignored by Linnaeus except for some genera (e.g., Vorticella, Chaos, Volvox, Corallina, Conferva, Ulva, Chara, Fucus) were Leeuwenhoek, O. F. Müller, C. G. Ehrenberg and Félix Dujardin.

Myoclonus

myoclonicmyoclonic jerkmyoclonic jerks
He suffered from a rare disease, an uncontrolled movement of the midriff, which now is named van Leeuwenhoek's disease.
It was first described by Antonie van Leeuwenhoek in 1723, who suffered from it.