Apennine Mountains

ApenninesApennineLigurian AppenninesLigurian ApennineLigurian ApenninesNorthern ApenninesAppenniniApennine Mountain RangeAppennine mountainsCentral Apennines
The Apennines or Apennine Mountains ( or Ἀπέννινον ὄρος; Appenninus or Apenninus Mons – a singular with plural meaning; Appennini ) are a mountain range consisting of parallel smaller chains extending c.wikipedia
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Ligurian Alps

-Ligurian AlpsAlpine ligurianLigurian Prealps
In the northwest they join with the Ligurian Alps at Altare.
They form the south-western extremity of the Alps, separated from the Apennines by the Colle di Cadibona.

Italian wolf

wolfItalian wolvesApennine wolf
These mountains are, in fact, one of the last refuges for the big European predators such as the Italian wolf and the marsican brown bear, now extinct in other countries of central Europe.
It inhabits the Apennine Mountains and the Western Alps, though it is undergoing expansion towards the north and east.

Sicily

SicilianSiciliaSicilians
Since 2000 the Environment Ministry of Italy, following the recommendations of the Apennines Park of Europe Project, has been defining the Apennines System to include the mountains of north Sicily, for a total distance of 1500 km.
Along the northern coast, the mountain ranges of Madonie, 2000 m, Nebrodi, 1800 m, and Peloritani, 1300 m, are an extension of the mainland Apennines.

Corno Grande

They are mostly verdant, although one side of the highest peak, Corno Grande is partially covered by Calderone glacier, the only glacier in the Apennines.
Corno Grande (Italian for "great horn") is the highest point in the Apennine Mountains, situated in Abruzzo, central Italy.

Calderone glacier

Calderone
They are mostly verdant, although one side of the highest peak, Corno Grande is partially covered by Calderone glacier, the only glacier in the Apennines.
The Calderone glacier (Ghiacciaio del Calderone) is a glacier located in the Apennine Mountains in Abruzzo, Italy.

Po Valley

Po plainPadan plainPianura Padana
The range follows the Gulf of Genoa separating it from the upper Po Valley.
The plain is the surface of an in-filled system of ancient canyons (the "Apennine Foredeep") extending from the Apennines in the south to the Alps in the north, including the northern Adriatic.

Latium

LatinLazioLatian
This view has the word originating in Latium inconsistently with the theory of the northern origin.
Subsequently, Rome defeated Veii and then its Italic neighbours, expanding Latium to the Apennine Mountains in the northeast and to the opposite end of the marsh in the southeast.

Italy

ItalianITAItalia
1200 km along the length of peninsular Italy.
The Apennine Mountains form the peninsula's backbone, and the Alps form most of its northern boundary, where Italy's highest point is located on Monte Bianco (4,810 m).

Tiber

Tiber RiverRiver TiberTevere
They extend to the upper Tiber River.
The Tiber (Tiberis; Tevere ) is the third-longest river in Italy, rising in the Apennine Mountains in Emilia-Romagna and flowing 406 km through Tuscany, Umbria and Lazio, where it is joined by the river Aniene, to the Tyrrhenian Sea, between Ostia and Fiumicino.

Trebbia

Val TrebbiaTrebbia RiverTrebia River
The Scrivia, the Trebbia and the Taro, tributaries of the Po River, drain the northeast slopes.
The source of the river, the Trebbia river spring, is in the Ligurian Apennines on the south slopes of Monte Prelà, to the south of Monte Antola in the comune of Torriglia, Province of Genoa.

Monte Cimone

CimoneMount Cimone
The highest point is Monte Cimone at 2165 m.
Monte Cimone is the highest mountain in the northern Apennines, of Italy.

Grand Italian Trail

Sentiero Italia
The Grand Italian Trail begins in Trieste and after winding through the Alpine arc traverses the entire Apennine system, Sicily and Sardinia.
The path, which is divided into 368 legs, begins in Trieste and then crosses the entire Alpine Arc, the entire Apennine mountain chain, Sicily and Sardinia before ending at Santa Teresa Gallura in Sardinia.

Via Flaminia

FlaminiaFlaminian Waycurator viae Flaminiae
Historically the Romans used the Via Flaminia between Rome and Rimini.
The Via Flaminia or Flaminian Way was an ancient Roman road leading from Rome over the Apennine Mountains to Ariminum (Rimini) on the coast of the Adriatic Sea, and due to the ruggedness of the mountains was the major option the Romans had for travel between Etruria, Latium, Campania, and the Po Valley.

Ligurian Sea

LigurianLigurian basinLigurian coast
The system forms an arc enclosing the east side of the Ligurian and Tyrrhenian Seas. The Ligurian Apennines border the Ligurian Sea in the Gulf of Genoa, from about Savona below the upper Bormida River valley to about La Spezia (La Cisa pass) below the upper Magra River valley.
The sea receives the Arno River from the east and many other rivers that originate in the Apennines.

Tuscany

TuscanToscanaTuscany, Italy
Starting at Cisa Pass, the mountain chains turn further to the southeast to cross the peninsula along the border between the Emilia-Romagna and Tuscany regions.
Hills make up nearly two-thirds (66.5%) of the region's total area, covering 15292 km2, and mountains (of which the highest are the Apennines), a further 25%, or 5770 km2.

Emilia-Romagna

Emilia RomagnaEmilia–RomagnaEmilia
Starting at Cisa Pass, the mountain chains turn further to the southeast to cross the peninsula along the border between the Emilia-Romagna and Tuscany regions.
The region's section of the Apennines is marked by areas of flisch, badland erosion (calanques) and caves.

Città di Castello

Citta di CastelloTifernum Tiberinumbishop of Città Castello
Geographically the southernmost sharp limit of the Tuscan–Romagnol Apennines is the Bocca Serriola pass that is politically in northern Umbria and links Fano and Città di Castello.
It is situated on a slope of the Apennines, on the flood plain along the upper part of the river Tiber.

Giovi Pass

GioviGiovi linePasso dei Giovi
Trenitalia, the state railway system, highly developed on the coastal plain, now traverses the mountains routinely through a number of railway tunnels, such as the one at Giovi Pass.
The Giovi Pass is a pass in Italy in the northwestern Ligurian Apennines north of Genoa.

Cisa Pass

Passo della CisaCisa ParmaLa Cisa pass
Starting at Cisa Pass, the mountain chains turn further to the southeast to cross the peninsula along the border between the Emilia-Romagna and Tuscany regions. The Ligurian Apennines border the Ligurian Sea in the Gulf of Genoa, from about Savona below the upper Bormida River valley to about La Spezia (La Cisa pass) below the upper Magra River valley.
The Cisa Pass or La Cisa Pass is a mountain pass in Italy that marks the division between the Ligurian and Tuscan Apennines.

Monte Vettore

Mount VectorMount VettoreSibilla Apenninica
The highest peak, Monte Vettore, at 2478 m, is part of the Monti Sibillini, incorporated into Parco Nazionale dei Monti Sibillini.
Monte Vettore (from Latin Vector, "carrier", "leader") is a mountain of the Apennines.

Altare

In the northwest they join with the Ligurian Alps at Altare.
Altare is just west of the Cadibona pass, which at 459 m divides the Ligurian Alps from the Ligurian Apennines.

Adriatic Sea

AdriaticAdriatic coastThe Adriatic
The eastern slopes down to the Adriatic Sea are steep, while the western slopes form foothills on which most of peninsular Italy's cities are located.
The plate's movement contributed to the formation of the surrounding mountain chains and Apennine tectonic uplift after its collision with the Eurasian plate.

Gran Sasso d'Italia

Gran SassoMonte CornoGran Sasso mountain
The eastern chain consists mainly of the southern part of the Monti Sibillini, the Monti della Laga, the Gran Sasso d'Italia Massif and the Majella Massif.
Gran Sasso d'Italia ( is an Apennine secondary mountain massif.

Futa Pass

FutaPasso della Futa
They are also named the Tuscan–Emilian Apennines west of the Futa pass and the Tuscan–Romagnol Apennines east of it, or just the Tuscan Apennines.
The Futa Pass or La Futa Pass (Passo della Futa) is a pass in the Tuscan-Emilian Apennines, at an elevation of 903 m. It is located in the comune of Firenzuola, in the province of Florence.

Monti della Laga

The eastern chain consists mainly of the southern part of the Monti Sibillini, the Monti della Laga, the Gran Sasso d'Italia Massif and the Majella Massif.
Monti della Laga is a mountain range in the central Apennines of Italy.