Apollo 12

12Apollo 12 missionApollo XIIApolloApollo 12 crewApollo 12 rocketastronautS-IVBsecond lunar landingsimilar strike caused problems on Apollo 12
Apollo 12 was the sixth crewed flight in the United States Apollo program and the second to land on the Moon.wikipedia
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Pete Conrad

Charles "Pete" ConradCharles Conrad, Jr.Charles Conrad
Commander Charles "Pete" Conrad and Apollo Lunar Module Pilot Alan L. Bean performed just over one day and seven hours of lunar surface activity while Command Module Pilot Richard F. Gordon remained in lunar orbit.
Charles "Pete" Conrad Jr. (June 2, 1930 – July 8, 1999) (Captain, USN), was an American NASA astronaut, aeronautical engineer, naval officer and aviator, test pilot, and commanded the Apollo 12 space mission, on which he became the third man to walk on the Moon.

Alan Bean

Alan L. BeanAl BeanAlan LaVern Bean
Commander Charles "Pete" Conrad and Apollo Lunar Module Pilot Alan L. Bean performed just over one day and seven hours of lunar surface activity while Command Module Pilot Richard F. Gordon remained in lunar orbit.
He made his first flight into space aboard Apollo 12, the second crewed mission to land on the Moon, at age 37 in November 1969.

Richard F. Gordon Jr.

Richard F. Gordon, Jr.Richard GordonDick Gordon
Commander Charles "Pete" Conrad and Apollo Lunar Module Pilot Alan L. Bean performed just over one day and seven hours of lunar surface activity while Command Module Pilot Richard F. Gordon remained in lunar orbit.
He was one of 24 people to have flown to the Moon, as the Command Module Pilot of the 1969 Apollo 12 mission which orbited the Moon 45 times.

Surveyor 3

Surveyor III
On November 19 Conrad and Bean achieved a precise landing at their expected location within walking distance of the site of the Surveyor 3 robotic probe, which had landed on April 20, 1967.
It was visited by Apollo 12 astronauts, and remains the only probe visited by humans on another world.

Apollo 11

1969 moon landingmoon landingfirst moon landing
It was launched on November 14, 1969, from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, four months after Apollo 11.
The Apollo 11 prime crew had none of the close cheerful camaraderie characterized by that of Apollo 12.

Kennedy Space Center

KennedyJohn F. Kennedy Space CenterKSC
It was launched on November 14, 1969, from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, four months after Apollo 11.
Apollo 12 followed four months later.

Edward Gibson

Edward G. GibsonEd GibsonEdward George Gibson
He served on the support crew of Apollo 12, the second Moon landing mission, before working on the development of the Skylab space station.

Apollo program

ApolloProject ApolloApollo space program
Apollo 12 was the sixth crewed flight in the United States Apollo program and the second to land on the Moon.
Crews on all development flights (except the Earth orbit CSM development flights) through the first two landings on Apollo 11 and Apollo 12, included at least two (sometimes three) Gemini veterans.

John Aaron

Electrical, Environmental and Consumables Manager (EECOM) John Aaron remembered the telemetry failure pattern from an earlier test when a power supply malfunctioned in the CSM signal conditioning electronics (SCE), which converted raw signals from instrumentation to standard voltages for the spacecraft instrument displays and telemetry encoders.
He is widely credited with saving the Apollo 12 mission when it was struck by lightning soon after launch, and also played an important role during the Apollo 13 crisis.

Clifton Williams

Clifton C. Williams Jr.C. C. WilliamsClifton "C. C." Williams
Originally, Conrad's Lunar Module pilot was Clifton C. Williams Jr., who was killed in October 1967 when the T-38 he was flying crashed near Tallahassee.
Following Williams' death, Alan Bean became Lunar Module pilot for Conrad's mission, which ended up being Apollo 12, the second lunar landing.

Flight controller

CAPCOMcapsule communicatorflight director
Electrical, Environmental and Consumables Manager (EECOM) John Aaron remembered the telemetry failure pattern from an earlier test when a power supply malfunctioned in the CSM signal conditioning electronics (SCE), which converted raw signals from instrumentation to standard voltages for the spacecraft instrument displays and telemetry encoders. The switch was fairly obscure, and neither Flight Director Gerald Griffin, CAPCOM Gerald Carr, nor Mission Commander Pete Conrad immediately recognized it.
Aaron also saved the Apollo 12 mission by realizing that using the backup power supply for telemetry of analog capsule sensors would allow diagnosis of all the seemingly-unrelated problems caused by a lightning strike.

Apollo Lunar Module

Lunar ModuleLunar Excursion ModuleLM
Commander Charles "Pete" Conrad and Apollo Lunar Module Pilot Alan L. Bean performed just over one day and seven hours of lunar surface activity while Command Module Pilot Richard F. Gordon remained in lunar orbit.
This was followed by landings by Apollo 12 (Intrepid) and Apollo 14 (Antares).In April 1970, the Apollo 13 lunar module Aquarius played an unexpected role in saving the lives of the three astronauts after an oxygen tank in the service module ruptured, disabling the CSM.

Reports of Streptococcus mitis on the Moon

Reports of ''Streptococcus mitis'' on the Moon
However, this finding has since been disputed: see Reports of Streptococcus mitis on the Moon.
As part of the Apollo 12 mission, the camera from the Surveyor 3 probe was brought back from the Moon to Earth.

J002E3

temporarily recaptured in Earth orbit 2002, escaped again 2003
It was discovered by amateur astronomer Bill Yeung who gave it the temporary designation J002E3 before it was determined to be an artificial object.
Initially thought to be an asteroid, it has since been tentatively identified as the S-IVB third stage of the Apollo 12 Saturn V rocket (designated S-IVB-507), based on spectrographic evidence consistent with the paint used on the rockets.

Saturn V instrument unit

Instrument Unitguidance and control systemguidance unit
However, the Saturn V continued to fly normally; the strikes had not affected the Saturn V instrument unit guidance system, which functions independently from the CSM.

Gerald Carr (astronaut)

Gerald P. CarrGerald CarrGerry Carr
The switch was fairly obscure, and neither Flight Director Gerald Griffin, CAPCOM Gerald Carr, nor Mission Commander Pete Conrad immediately recognized it.
He served as a member of the astronaut support crews and as CAPCOM for the Apollo 8 and 12 flights, and was involved in the development and testing of the Lunar Roving Vehicle.

Moon

lunarthe MoonLuna
Apollo 12 was the sixth crewed flight in the United States Apollo program and the second to land on the Moon.
Long-lived instrument stations, including heat flow probes, seismometers, and magnetometers, were installed at the Apollo 12, 14, 15, 16, and 17 landing sites.

Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package

ALSEPApollo Lunar Surface Experiment PackageApollo Lunar Active Seismic Experiments
The instruments were part of the first complete nuclear-powered ALSEP station set up by astronauts on the Moon to relay long-term data from the lunar surface.
The Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP) comprised a set of scientific instruments placed by the astronauts at the landing site of each of the five Apollo missions to land on the Moon following Apollo 11 (Apollos 12, 14, 15, 16, and 17).

Apollo TV camera

Apollo lunar landing camerascolor TV cameralive television
Unfortunately, when Bean carried the camera to the place near the LM where it was to be set up, he inadvertently pointed it directly into the Sun, destroying the Secondary Electron Conduction (SEC) tube.
The cameras all used image pickup tubes that were initially fragile, as one was irreparably damaged during the live broadcast of the Apollo 12 mission's first moonwalk.

Solar eclipse

solarsolar eclipseseclipse
On the return flight to Earth after leaving lunar orbit, the crew of Apollo 12 witnessed (and photographed) a solar eclipse, though this one was of the Earth eclipsing the Sun.
Two examples are when the crew of Apollo 12 observed the in 1969 and when the Cassini probe observed in 2006.

Lunar plaque

plaquecommemorative plaquescommemorative plaque
The lunar plaque attached to the descent stage of Intrepid is unique in that unlike the other plaques, it (a) did not have a depiction of the Earth, and (b) it was textured differently: The other plaques had black lettering on polished stainless steel while the Apollo 12 plaque had the lettering in polished stainless steel while the background was brushed flat.
All, except the Apollo 12 plaque (which is also textured differently), bear pictures of the two hemispheres of Earth.

American Samoa

America SamoaSamoaAS
Yankee Clipper returned to Earth on November 24, 1969 at 20:58 UTC (3:58pm EST, 10:58am HST), in the Pacific Ocean, approximately 500 nautical miles (800 km) east of American Samoa.
The astronaut crews of Apollo 10, 12, 13, 14, and 17 were retrieved a few hundred miles from Pago Pago and transported by helicopter to the airport prior to being flown to Honolulu on C-141 Starlifter military aircraft.

Oceanus Procellarum

Ocean of StormsProcellarumProcellarum basin
The landing site for the mission was located in the southeastern portion of the Ocean of Storms.
The manned Apollo 12 mission landed in Oceanus Procellarum, with astronauts Pete Conrad and Alan Bean on board.

William Kwong Yu Yeung

W. K. Y. YeungBill YeungWilliam Yeung
It was discovered by amateur astronomer Bill Yeung who gave it the temporary designation J002E3 before it was determined to be an artificial object.
He also discovered the object J002E3, which was first thought to be an asteroid, but is now known to be part of a Saturn V Rocket that propelled Apollo 12 into space.

Lunar seismology

Moonseismicity
Astronauts Conrad and Bean also collected rocks and set up equipment that took measurements of the Moon's seismicity, solar wind flux and magnetic field, and relayed the measurements to Earth.
The instruments placed by the Apollo 12, 14, 15, and 16 missions were functional until they were switched off in 1977.