Aponia

absence of bodily pain
"Aponia" means the absence of pain, and was regarded by the Epicureans to be the height of bodily pleasure.wikipedia
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Epicureanism

EpicureanEpicureansEpicurean philosophy
"Aponia" means the absence of pain, and was regarded by the Epicureans to be the height of bodily pleasure. As with the other Hellenistic schools of philosophy, the Epicureans believed that the goal of human life is happiness.
Epicurus regarded ataraxia (tranquility, freedom from fear) and aponia (absence of pain) as the height of happiness.

Epicurus

EpicureanEpicurean paradoxEpicurean doctrine
For Epicurus, aponia was one of the static (katastematic) pleasures, that is, a pleasure one has when there is no want or pain to be removed.
For Epicurus, the purpose of philosophy was to attain the happy, tranquil life, characterized by ataraxia—peace and freedom from fear—and aponia—the absence of pain—and by living a self-sufficient life surrounded by friends.

Ataraxia

detachmentequanimity
Those who achieved freedom from physical disturbance were said to be in a state of aponia, while those who achieved freedom from mental disturbances were said to be in a state of ataraxia.

Pain

physical painacute painnociceptive pain
"Aponia" means the absence of pain, and was regarded by the Epicureans to be the height of bodily pleasure.

Hellenistic philosophy

HellenisticHellenismHellenistic philosophers
As with the other Hellenistic schools of philosophy, the Epicureans believed that the goal of human life is happiness.

Happiness

happyenjoymentJolly
As with the other Hellenistic schools of philosophy, the Epicureans believed that the goal of human life is happiness.

Apatheia

equanimityapatheticἀπάθεια

Philosophy of happiness

A happy societyhappinessJanello, Martin
The goal of his philosophy was to attain a state of tranquility (ataraxia, Greek: ἀταραξία) and freedom from fear, as well as absence of bodily pain (aponia, Greek: ἀπονία).

Meaning of life

meaningPurpose in lifemeaning in life
Epicurus, a pupil of the Platonist Pamphilus of Samos, taught that the greatest good is in seeking modest pleasures, to attain tranquility and freedom from fear (ataraxia) via knowledge, friendship, and virtuous, temperate living; bodily pain (aponia) is absent through one's knowledge of the workings of the world and of the limits of one's desires.

Hedonism

hedonistichedonisthedonic
Following Aristippus—about whom very little is known—Epicurus believed that the greatest good was to seek modest, sustainable "pleasure" in the form of a state of tranquility and freedom from fear (ataraxia) and absence of bodily pain (aponia) through knowledge of the workings of the world and the limits of our desires.

Jun Tsuji

Tsuji Jun
He also spent his time primarily trying to enjoy a simple life free of suffering (see Aponia).

Katastematic pleasure

Absence of pain, aponia, and lack of disturbance of mind, ataraxia, are two of the katastematic pleasures and often seen as the focal ones to Epicurus.

Conímbriga

Conimbriga
Many of the new colonists came from the Italian peninsula (like the Lucanus, Murrius, Vitellius and Aponia families) and intermarried with local inhabitants (such as the Turrania, Valeria, Alios and Maelo families).