Appellation d'origine contrôlée

appellationAOCAppellation d’Origine ContrôléeappellationsAOCsappellation contrôléeAppellations d'Origine Contrôléesappellation areaappellation of originAppellations d'origine contrôlée
The appellation d'origine contrôlée (AOC; ; "protected designation of origin") is the French certification granted to certain French geographical indications for wines, cheeses, butters, and other agricultural products, all under the auspices of the government bureau Institut national des appellations d'origine, now called Institut national de l'origine et de la qualité (INAO).wikipedia
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Geographical indication

Australian Geographical IndicationGeographical IndicationsAppellation of Origin
The appellation d'origine contrôlée (AOC; ; "protected designation of origin") is the French certification granted to certain French geographical indications for wines, cheeses, butters, and other agricultural products, all under the auspices of the government bureau Institut national des appellations d'origine, now called Institut national de l'origine et de la qualité (INAO).
Appellation of origin is a subtype of geographical indication where quality, method and reputation of a product strictly originate from the delineated area defined under its intellectual property right registration.

French wine

FranceFrenchFrench wines
The appellation d'origine contrôlée (AOC; ; "protected designation of origin") is the French certification granted to certain French geographical indications for wines, cheeses, butters, and other agricultural products, all under the auspices of the government bureau Institut national des appellations d'origine, now called Institut national de l'origine et de la qualité (INAO).
Two concepts central to the better French wines are the notion of terroir, which links the style of the wines to the locations where the grapes are grown and the wine is made and the Appellation d'origine contrôlée (AOC) system, replaced by the Appellation d'Origin Protégée (AOP) system in 2012.

Rhône wine

RhôneRhône wine regionRhône Valley
In the Rhône wine region Baron Pierre Le Roy Boiseaumarié, a trained lawyer and winegrower from Châteauneuf-du-Pape, successfully obtained legal recognition of the "Côtes du Rhône" appellation of origin in 1936.
The Rhône wine region in Southern France is situated in the Rhône valley and produces numerous wines under various Appellation d'origine contrôlée (AOC) designations.

Joseph Capus

On July 30, 1935, the Comité National des appellations d'origine (CNAO), with representatives of the government and the major winegrowers, was created to manage the administration of the process for wines at the initiative of deputy Joseph Capus.
He was active in legislation related to agriculture and was the driving force behind introduction of the Appellation d'origine contrôlée for French wines.

Terroir

terroirsplantation areasterrior
It is based on the concept of terroir.
Terroir is the basis of the French wine appellation d'origine contrôlée (AOC) system, which is a model for wine appellation and regulation in France and around the world.

Côtes du Rhône AOC

Côtes du RhôneCôtes du Rhône VillagesCôtes-du-Rhône
In the Rhône wine region Baron Pierre Le Roy Boiseaumarié, a trained lawyer and winegrower from Châteauneuf-du-Pape, successfully obtained legal recognition of the "Côtes du Rhône" appellation of origin in 1936. For example, the Côtes du Rhône AOC "covers some 400 km2, but within its area lies one of the smallest AOCs, Château-Grillet, which occupies less than 4 ha of land."
Côtes du Rhône is a wine-growing Appellation d'Origine Contrôlée (AOC) for the Rhône wine region of France, which may be used throughout the region, also in those areas which are covered by other AOCs.

Pierre Le Roy de Boiseaumarié

Baron Pierre Le Roy BoiseaumariéPierre Le Roy de BoiseaumariePierre Leroy De Boiseaumarie
In the Rhône wine region Baron Pierre Le Roy Boiseaumarié, a trained lawyer and winegrower from Châteauneuf-du-Pape, successfully obtained legal recognition of the "Côtes du Rhône" appellation of origin in 1936.
He was the co-founder of the Institut National des Appellations d'Origine (INAO) and guided the creation of the Appellation d'origine contrôlée (AOC) system which is the basis of not only French wine laws but has also been influential in the laws and appellation systems across the globe.

List of Appellation d'Origine Contrôlée wines

300 French winesFrench winesList of ''Appellation d'Origine Contrôlée'' wines
There are currently over 300 French wines entitled to the designation AOC on their label.
The following is a list of French wines that are entitled to use the designation Appellation d'Origine Contrôlée (AOC) on their label.

Château-Grillet AOC

Château-GrilletChâteau GrilletChateau Grillet
For example, the Côtes du Rhône AOC "covers some 400 km2, but within its area lies one of the smallest AOCs, Château-Grillet, which occupies less than 4 ha of land."
Château-Grillet is a wine-growing AOC in the northern Rhône wine region of France, near Vienne, which produces white wine from Viognier grapes.

Cabardès AOC

CabardèsCabardesCôtes du Cabardès et de l'Orbiel
For example, there are a dozen townships in l'Aude that have Cabardès in their names, several of which are not even within the geographical boundaries of the Cabardès AOC.
Cabardès is an Appellation d'Origine Contrôlée (AOC) for red and rosé wine in Languedoc-Roussillon wine region in France.

List of French cheeses

French cheesecheesesFrance
The appellation d'origine contrôlée (AOC; ; "protected designation of origin") is the French certification granted to certain French geographical indications for wines, cheeses, butters, and other agricultural products, all under the auspices of the government bureau Institut national des appellations d'origine, now called Institut national de l'origine et de la qualité (INAO).
Under the Common Agricultural Policy of the European Union, certain established cheeses, including many French varieties, are covered by a protected designation of origin (PDO), and other, less stringent, designations of geographical origin for traditional specialities, such as the French appellation d'origine contrôlée (AOC) system, the Italian denominazione di origine controllata (DOC) system, and the Spanish Denominación de origen system.

Bresse chicken

poulet de BresseBressepoultry
On August 15, 1957, the National Assembly gave AOC status to the poultry of Bresse (Poulet de Bresse).
The poulet de Bresse or volaille de Bresse is a French chicken product which has appellation d'origine contrôlée status.

Roquefort

Roquefort cheeseRoquefort, FranceRoquefort, Lot-et-Garonne
The origins of AOC date to the year 1411, when Roquefort was regulated by a parliamentary decree.
In 1925, the cheese was the recipient of France's first Appellation d'Origine Contrôlée when regulations controlling its production and naming were first defined.

Institut national de l'origine et de la qualité

INAOInstitut National des Appellations d'Origineappellations
The appellation d'origine contrôlée (AOC; ; "protected designation of origin") is the French certification granted to certain French geographical indications for wines, cheeses, butters, and other agricultural products, all under the auspices of the government bureau Institut national des appellations d'origine, now called Institut national de l'origine et de la qualité (INAO).
Every Appellation d'Origine Contrôlée (AOC), the French term for PDOs, is produced according to rules codified by the INAO.

Law of 6 May 1919 relating to the Protection of Appellations of Origin

Law for the Protection of the Place of Origin
The first French law on viticultural designations of origin dates to August 1, 1905, whereas the first modern law was set on May 6, 1919, when the Law for the Protection of the Place of Origin was passed, specifying the region and commune in which a given product must be manufactured, and has been revised on many occasions since then.
It is not the earliest such law but is probably the most influential, as it instituted the well-known system of appellations d'origine contrôlées.

Cognac

BorderiescognacsXO cognac
Armagnac, Calvados, Cognac and Martinique Rhum Agricole all have AOC status.
Cognac production falls under French appellation d'origine contrôlée designation, with production methods and naming required to meet certain legal requirements.

Alpes-de-Haute-Provence

Basses-AlpesAlpes de Haute-ProvenceAlpes-de Haute-Provence
This geographic area covers 284 communities in the Alpes-de-Haute-Provence, Hautes-Alpes, Drôme and Vaucluse regions.
These are for the breeding of sheep and goats, including the production of milk used for cheese making under Appellation d'origine contrôlée (AOC) for Banon cheese.

Le Puy green lentil

kind of lentilLe Puy lentilsPuy lentils
(See: Le Puy Green lentil.)
The term "Le Puy green lentil" is protected throughout the European Union (EU) under that governing body's Protected Designation of Origin (PDO), and in France as an appellation d'origine contrôlée (AOC).

Calvados

apple brandyC.A.L.V.ACalvados brandy
Armagnac, Calvados, Cognac and Martinique Rhum Agricole all have AOC status.
The appellation contrôlée regulations officially gave calvados a protected name in 1942.

Bresse

BressanBresse bourguignonneBresse plain
On August 15, 1957, the National Assembly gave AOC status to the poultry of Bresse (Poulet de Bresse).
The chickens of Bresse, formerly ranging freely, were the first animals to have an Appellation d'Origine Contrôlée.

Appellation

appellationsAustralian Geographical Indicationcontrolled appellation
Many other countries have based their controlled place name systems on the French AOC classification.
The AOC seal, or Appellation d'Origine Contrôlée, was created and mandated by French laws in the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s.

Vin de pays

Country winevins de pays
Qualitätswein bestimmter Anbaugebiete wines are commonly seen as less prestigious than Qualitätswein mit Prädikat, making it more similar to the Vin de Pays or Vin Délimité de Qualité Supérieure systems.
Vin de pays (, "country wine") is a French wine classification that is above the vin de table classification, but below the appellation d'origine contrôlée classification, as well as the former vin délimité de qualité supérieure classification.

Districtus Austriae Controllatus

official wine regionDistrictus Austria ControllatusEisenberg DAC
Portugal's Denominação de Origem Controlada, Austria's Districtus Austria Controllatus, South Africa's Wine of Origin, and Switzerland's AOC-IGP are all similar to the French AOC system as well.
It is loosely modelled on the French Appellation d'Origine Contrôlée (AOC) system, and is coupled with a ripeness-based classification scale that shares a lot of nomenclature with the German Prädikat system.

Vin délimité de qualité supérieure

VDQSVin Délimité de Qualité SuperieureAOVDQS
Qualitätswein bestimmter Anbaugebiete wines are commonly seen as less prestigious than Qualitätswein mit Prädikat, making it more similar to the Vin de Pays or Vin Délimité de Qualité Supérieure systems.
Vin délimité de qualité supérieure ("Delimited Wine of Superior Quality"), usually abbreviated as VDQS, was the second highest category of French wine, below Appellation d'Origine Contrôlée (AOC) in rank, but above Vin de pays (country wine).

Vendée

La VendéeVendee85
France recognizes the Charente, Charente-Maritime, Vienne, Deux-Sèvres and Vendée AOC regions for butter.
Production quality has improved markedly over recent years, and, having already achieved the classification Vin Délimité de Qualité Supérieure (VDQS), the wines are on their way towards A.O.C status (Appellation d’Origine Contrôlée).