Garment workers on strike, New York City circa 1913
Electricians are often trained through apprenticeships.
Early 19th century workplace militancy manifested in the Luddite riots, when unemployed workers destroyed labour saving machines.
A medieval baker with his apprentice. The Bodleian Library, Oxford, England.
Poster issued by the London Trades Council, advertising a demonstration held on 2 June 1873
Typology of Apprenticeships
Trade union demonstrators held at bay by soldiers during the 1912 Lawrence textile strike in Lawrence, Massachusetts
Students in a vocational training restaurant, Bagan (Myanmar)
Eight-hour day march circa 1900, outside Parliament House in Spring Street, Melbourne
Cook with her apprentice, Euroinstitut vocational school, Czech Republic
Costa Rican agricultural unions demonstration, January 2011
Canadian Inter-provincial 'Red Seal' certification (note that license number was replaced with the word 'CANOE')
2011 National Trade Union Council (Zenrokyo) May Day march, Tokyo
A master chimney sweep and apprentice in 2008
Workers on strike in Oslo, Norway, 2012
Public sector workers in Leeds striking over pension changes by the government in November 2011
Child labourers in an Indiana glass works. Labor unions have an objective interest in combating child labour.
Cesar Chavez speaking at a 1974 United Farm Workers rally in Delano, California. The UFW during Chavez's tenure was committed to restricting immigration.
The Great Southwest Railroad Strike of 1886 was a trade union strike involving more than 200,000 workers.
A rally of the trade union UNISON in Oxford during a strike on 28 March 2006

Although the formal boundaries and terminology of the apprentice/journeyman/master system often do not extend outside guilds and trade unions, the concept of on-the-job training leading to competence over a period of years is found in any field of skilled labor.

- Apprenticeship

Trade unions may be composed of individual workers, professionals, past workers, students, apprentices or the unemployed.

- Trade union
Garment workers on strike, New York City circa 1913

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The Syndics of the Drapers' Guild by Rembrandt, 1662.

Guild

Association of artisans and merchants who oversee the practice of their craft/trade in a particular area.

Association of artisans and merchants who oversee the practice of their craft/trade in a particular area.

The Syndics of the Drapers' Guild by Rembrandt, 1662.
One of the legacies of the guilds: the elevated Windsor Guildhall originated as a meeting place for guilds, as well as a magistrates' seat and town hall.
Traditional hand forged guild sign of a glazier — in Germany. These signs can be found in many old European towns where guild members marked their places of business. Many survived through time or staged a comeback in industrial times. Today they are restored or even newly created, especially in old town areas.
Coats of arms of guilds in a town in the Czech Republic displaying symbols of various European medieval trades and crafts
The medieval Merchant Guild House in Vyborg, Russia
A center of urban government: the Guildhall, London (engraving, c. 1805)
Locksmith, 1451
The Haarlem Painter's Guild in 1675, by Jan de Bray.
An example of the last of the British Guilds meeting rooms c. 1820
Shoemakers, 1568

Where guilds were in control, they shaped labor, production and trade; they had strong controls over instructional capital, and the modern concepts of a lifetime progression of apprentice to craftsman, and then from journeyman eventually to widely recognized master and grandmaster began to emerge.

Often, they are better characterized as a labor union — for example, The Newspaper Guild is a labor union for journalists and other newspaper workers, with over 30,000 members in North America.