Arcade game

Arcadearcadesarcade gamesarcade video gamearcade-stylecoin-oparcade video gamescoin-operated video gamecoin-operated arcade gamearcade flight
An arcade game or coin-op is a coin-operated entertainment machine typically installed in public businesses such as restaurants, bars and amusement arcades.wikipedia
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Amusement arcade

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An arcade game or coin-op is a coin-operated entertainment machine typically installed in public businesses such as restaurants, bars and amusement arcades.
An amusement arcade (often referred to as "video arcade" or simply "arcade") is a venue where people play arcade games such as video games, pinball machines, electro-mechanical games, redemption games, merchandisers (such as claw cranes), or coin-operated billiards or air hockey tables.

Pinball

pinball machinepinball machinesflipper
Most arcade games are video games, pinball machines, electro-mechanical games, redemption games or merchandisers.
Pinball is a type of arcade game, in which points are scored by a player manipulating one or more steel balls on a play field inside a glass-covered cabinet called a pinball table (or "pinball machine").

Golden age of arcade video games

golden age of video arcade gamesgolden ageclassic arcade games
While exact dates are debated, the golden age of arcade video games is usually defined as a period beginning sometime in the late 1970s and ending sometime in the mid-1980s.
The golden age of arcade video games was the era when arcade video games entered pop culture and became a dominant cultural force.

Video game

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Most arcade games are video games, pinball machines, electro-mechanical games, redemption games or merchandisers.
Specialized platforms such as arcade games, which present the game in a large, typically coin-operated chassis, were common in the 1980s in video arcades, but declined in popularity as other, more affordable platforms became available.

Redemption game

redemptionarcade redemptionRedemption (Ticket) Games
Most arcade games are video games, pinball machines, electro-mechanical games, redemption games or merchandisers.
Redemption games are typically arcade games of skill that reward the player proportionally to their score in the game.

Electronic game

electro-mechanicalelectronic gameselectro-mechanical game
In 1966 Sega introduced an electro-mechanical game called Periscope - an early submarine simulator and light gun shooter which used lights and plastic waves to simulate sinking ships from a submarine.
Other common forms of electronic game include such products as handheld electronic games, standalone systems (e.g. pinball, slot machines, or electro-mechanical arcade games), and exclusively non-visual products (e.g. audio games).

Racing video game

Racingracing gameDriving
That same year, Sega released an electro-mechanical arcade racing game, Grand Prix, which had a first-person view, electronic sound, a dashboard with a racing wheel and accelerator, and a forward-scrolling road projected on a screen.
In general, they can be distributed along a spectrum anywhere between hardcore simulations, and simpler arcade racing games.

Taito

Taito CorporationTaito AmericaTaito America Corporation
In 1967 Taito released an electro-mechanical arcade game of their own, Crown Soccer Special, a two-player sports game that simulated association football, using various electronic components, including electronic versions of pinball flippers.
Taito is known for producing arcade games, such as Space Invaders, Bubble Bobble, and Arkanoid.

Sports game

Sportssports video gameSport
In 1967 Taito released an electro-mechanical arcade game of their own, Crown Soccer Special, a two-player sports game that simulated association football, using various electronic components, including electronic versions of pinball flippers.
Around that time, electro-mechanical sports arcade games were being produced.

Score (game)

high scorescorepoints
The first of these, the light-gun game Duck Hunt, appeared in 1969; it featured animated moving targets on a screen, printed out the player's score on a ticket, and had volume-controllable sound-effects.
During the era of arcade games, when, because of the technical limitations of the time, games could not be "won" or "completed" but were instead endless cycles of continuous gameplay, points had a much greater relevance.

Combat flight simulation game

combat flight simulatorcombat flight simulationaerial combat
In the same year, Sega released Jet Rocket, a combat flight-simulator featuring cockpit controls that could move the player aircraft around a landscape displayed on a screen and shoot missiles onto targets that explode when hit.
Prior to the rise of modern-day video games, electro-mechanical games were produced that used rear image projection in a manner similar to the ancient zoetrope to produce moving animations on a screen.

Periscope (arcade game)

Periscope
In 1966 Sega introduced an electro-mechanical game called Periscope - an early submarine simulator and light gun shooter which used lights and plastic waves to simulate sinking ships from a submarine.
Periscope is an electro-mechanical shooter arcade game.

Space Invaders

Space Invaders: The Original GameSpace InvaderINVADERS
The 1978 video game Space Invaders, however, dealt a yet more powerful blow to the popularity of electro-mechanical games.
Space Invaders is an arcade game created by Tomohiro Nishikado and released in 1978.

Nintendo

Nintendo of AmericaNintendo Co., Ltd.NES
In 1974, Nintendo released Wild Gunman, a light-gun shooter that used full-motion video-projection from 16 mm film to display live-action cowboy opponents on the screen.
In 1975, Nintendo moved into the video arcade game industry with EVR Race, designed by their first game designer, Genyo Takeda, and several more games followed.

Wild Gunman

In 1974, Nintendo released Wild Gunman, a light-gun shooter that used full-motion video-projection from 16 mm film to display live-action cowboy opponents on the screen.
Originally created as an electro-mechanical arcade game in 1974 by Gunpei Yokoi, it was adapted to a video game format and released in 1985 as a launch title for the Nintendo Entertainment System.

Galaxy Game

In 1971 students at Stanford University set up the Galaxy Game, a coin-operated version of the video game Spacewar.
Galaxy Game is a space combat arcade game developed in 1971 during the early era of video games.

Computer Space

Later in the same year, Nolan Bushnell created the first mass-manufactured game, Computer Space, for Nutting Associates.
Computer Space is a space combat arcade game developed in 1971 as one of the last games created in the early history of video games.

Galaxian

Galactic Invasion
Space Invaders (1978), Galaxian (1979), Pac-Man (1980), Battlezone (1980), Defender (1980), and Bosconian (1981) were especially popular.
Galaxian is an arcade game that was developed by Namco and released in October 1979.

Pac-Man

Pacmanarcade gamearcade game of the same name
Space Invaders (1978), Galaxian (1979), Pac-Man (1980), Battlezone (1980), Defender (1980), and Bosconian (1981) were especially popular.
Pac-Man, stylized in all capitals, is an arcade game designed by Toru Iwatani of Namco and first released in Japan as Puck Man in May.

Atari

Atari Inc.Atari EuropeAtari Corp.
One of the last successful electro-mechanical arcade games was F-1, a racing game developed by Namco and distributed by Atari in 1976; this game appeared in the films Dawn of the Dead (1978)
The original Atari, Inc., founded in Sunnyvale, California in 1972 by Nolan Bushnell and Ted Dabney, was a pioneer in arcade games, home video game consoles, and home computers.

Battlezone (1980 video game)

BattlezoneBattlezone 2000Battle Zone
Space Invaders (1978), Galaxian (1979), Pac-Man (1980), Battlezone (1980), Defender (1980), and Bosconian (1981) were especially popular.
Battlezone is a first-person shooter tank combat arcade game from Atari, Inc. released in November 1980.

D-pad

directional paddirectional buttonsjoypad
It was the earliest known arcade game to feature a joystick with a fire button, which formed part of an early dual-control scheme, where two directional buttons are used to move the player's tank and a two-way joystick is used to shoot and steer the missile onto oncoming planes displayed on the screen; when a plane is hit, an animated explosion appears on screen, accompanied by the sound of an explosion.
A precursor to the D-pad was the four directional buttons used in arcade games such as UPL's Blockade (1976) and SNK's Vanguard (1981).

Midway Games

MidwayBally MidwayMidway Manufacturing
In 1970 Midway released the game in North America as S.A.M.I..
In 1973 it moved into the interactive entertainment industry, developing and publishing arcade video games.

Hang-On

Sega AM2's Hang-On, designed by Yu Suzuki and running on the Sega Space Harrier hardware, was the first of Sega's "Super Scaler" arcade system boards that allowed pseudo-3D sprite-scaling at high frame rates.
Hang-On is an arcade game designed by Yu Suzuki and released by Sega in 1985.

Arcade system board

system boardsystem boardsarcade
Sega AM2's Hang-On, designed by Yu Suzuki and running on the Sega Space Harrier hardware, was the first of Sega's "Super Scaler" arcade system boards that allowed pseudo-3D sprite-scaling at high frame rates.
An arcade system board is a dedicated computer system created for the purpose of running video arcade games.