ArcelorMittal Orbit

OrbitArcelorMittal ''OrbitOrbit tower
The ArcelorMittal Orbit (often referred to as the Orbit Tower or its original name, Orbit) is a 114.5-metre-high sculpture and observation tower in the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park in Stratford, London.wikipedia
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Anish Kapoor

Sir Anish Kapoor
Orbit was designed by Turner-Prize winning artist Sir Anish Kapoor and Cecil Balmond of Arup Group, an engineering firm.
His notable public sculptures include Cloud Gate (2006, colloquially known as "the Bean") in Chicago's Millennium Park; Sky Mirror, exhibited at the Rockefeller Center in New York City in 2006 and Kensington Gardens in London in 2010; Temenos, at Middlehaven, Middlesbrough; Leviathan, at the Grand Palais in Paris in 2011; and ArcelorMittal Orbit, commissioned as a permanent artwork for London's Olympic Park and completed in 2012.

2012 Summer Paralympics

2012 Paralympic Games20122012 London
It is Britain's largest piece of public art, and is intended to be a permanent lasting legacy of London's hosting of the 2012 Summer Olympic and Paralympic Games, assisting in the post-Olympics regeneration of the Stratford area. During the opening ceremony of the 2012 Summer Paralympics, Joe Townsend (a Royal Marine and double amputee) delivered the Paralympic flame into Olympic Stadium via a zipline that was attached to the top of Orbit.
"Future" Paralympic athlete Joe Townsend, a Royal Marine who lost both of his legs after stepping on a land mine on duty in Afghanistan, delivered the flame to Olympic Stadium via a zipline from the ArcelorMittal Orbit tower.

Lakshmi Mittal

Lakshmi Niwas MittalLaxmi MittalL N Mittal
The project was expected to cost £19.1 million, with £16 million coming from Britain's then-richest man, the steel tycoon Lakshmi Mittal, Chairman of the ArcelorMittal steel company, and the balance of £3.1 million coming from the London Development Agency.
ArcelorMittal also provided steel for the construction of the ArcelorMittal Orbit for the 2012 Summer Olympics.

Aspire (sculpture)

AspireAspire'' (sculpture)
However, it finally measured in at 114.5 m making it the UK's tallest sculpture surpassing "Aspire" (at 60m).
It is a 60-metre tall, red and orange steel sculpture, and was, until overtaken by Anish Kapoor's Orbit, the tallest free standing public work of art in the United Kingdom, taller than B of the Bang, Nelson's Column, the Angel of the North.

London Stadium

Olympic StadiumLondon Olympic StadiumLondon
Sited between the Olympic Stadium and the Aquatics Centre, it allows visitors to view the whole Olympic Park from two observation platforms.

Ushida Findlay Architects

Ushida Findlay
Architectural input by Kathryn Findlay (Ushida Findlay Architects, as a sub-consultant to Arup) made the sculpture into a functional building, for example designing the staircase.
The practice were architects for the ArcelorMittal Orbit tower, the UK's tallest sculpture, providing architectural design to transform it into a functional building.

Kathryn Findlay

Architectural input by Kathryn Findlay (Ushida Findlay Architects, as a sub-consultant to Arup) made the sculpture into a functional building, for example designing the staircase.
In 2012 Findlay worked as a delivery architect for Anish Kapoor's monumental ArcelorMittal Orbit for the London Olympics.

Arup Group

ArupOve Arup & PartnersArup Associates
Orbit was designed by Turner-Prize winning artist Sir Anish Kapoor and Cecil Balmond of Arup Group, an engineering firm.

Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park

Olympic ParkOlympic Park, LondonLondon Olympic Park
The ArcelorMittal Orbit (often referred to as the Orbit Tower or its original name, Orbit) is a 114.5-metre-high sculpture and observation tower in the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park in Stratford, London.
The park is overlooked by the ArcelorMittal Orbit, an observation tower and Britain's largest piece of public art.

2012 Summer Paralympics opening ceremony

opening ceremonyopening2012 Paralympic Opening Ceremony
During the opening ceremony of the 2012 Summer Paralympics, Joe Townsend (a Royal Marine and double amputee) delivered the Paralympic flame into Olympic Stadium via a zipline that was attached to the top of Orbit.
Royal Marine Commando Joe Townsend, who hoped to compete in Rio (he went on to compete in paratriathlon), followed by zip wiring into the Olympic Stadium from the ArcelorMittal Orbit carrying the Paralympic torch.

Carbuncle Cup

In October 2012, ArcelorMittal Orbit was nominated and made the Building Design magazine shortlist for the Carbuncle Cup—an award for the worst British building completed in the past year, which was ultimately awarded to the Cutty Sark renovation.

ArcelorMittal

Arcelor MittalArcelor-MittalMittal Steel
The project was expected to cost £19.1 million, with £16 million coming from Britain's then-richest man, the steel tycoon Lakshmi Mittal, Chairman of the ArcelorMittal steel company, and the balance of £3.1 million coming from the London Development Agency.

Observation tower

viewing towerobservationobservation towers
The ArcelorMittal Orbit (often referred to as the Orbit Tower or its original name, Orbit) is a 114.5-metre-high sculpture and observation tower in the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park in Stratford, London.

Stratford, London

StratfordStratford, EssexStratford, East London
The ArcelorMittal Orbit (often referred to as the Orbit Tower or its original name, Orbit) is a 114.5-metre-high sculpture and observation tower in the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park in Stratford, London.

Public art

public sculpturepublic artworkpublic
It is Britain's largest piece of public art, and is intended to be a permanent lasting legacy of London's hosting of the 2012 Summer Olympic and Paralympic Games, assisting in the post-Olympics regeneration of the Stratford area.

2012 Summer Olympics

20122012 London Olympics2012 Olympic Games
It is Britain's largest piece of public art, and is intended to be a permanent lasting legacy of London's hosting of the 2012 Summer Olympic and Paralympic Games, assisting in the post-Olympics regeneration of the Stratford area.

London Aquatics Centre

Aquatics CentreAquatic centreAquatics Centre (London)
Sited between the Olympic Stadium and the Aquatics Centre, it allows visitors to view the whole Olympic Park from two observation platforms.

Turner Prize

The Turner PrizecriticismTurner-Prize
Orbit was designed by Turner-Prize winning artist Sir Anish Kapoor and Cecil Balmond of Arup Group, an engineering firm.

Cecil Balmond

Orbit was designed by Turner-Prize winning artist Sir Anish Kapoor and Cecil Balmond of Arup Group, an engineering firm.
The ArcelorMittal Orbit is designed by Balmond and Anish Kapoor.

Mayor of London

London MayorMayorMetropolitan Mayor
The project came about after Mayor of London Boris Johnson and Olympics Minister Tessa Jowell decided in 2008 that the Olympic Park needed "something extra".

Boris Johnson

JohnsonAlexander Boris de Pfeffel JohnsonBoris
The project came about after Mayor of London Boris Johnson and Olympics Minister Tessa Jowell decided in 2008 that the Olympic Park needed "something extra".

Minister for the Olympics

Shadow Minister for the Olympicsits Olympics spokespersonMinister for the Olympics of the United Kingdom
The project came about after Mayor of London Boris Johnson and Olympics Minister Tessa Jowell decided in 2008 that the Olympic Park needed "something extra".

Tessa Jowell

Dame Tessa JowellTessa Jowell MPTessa Jowell, Baroness Jowell
The project came about after Mayor of London Boris Johnson and Olympics Minister Tessa Jowell decided in 2008 that the Olympic Park needed "something extra".

Structural engineering

structuralstructural designstructural engineer
Kapoor and Balmond believed that Orbit represented a radical advance in the architectural field of combining sculpture and structural engineering, and that it combined both stability and instability in a work that visitors can engage with and experience via an incorporated spiral walkway.

London Development Agency

LDALondon Development Agency Act 2003
The project was expected to cost £19.1 million, with £16 million coming from Britain's then-richest man, the steel tycoon Lakshmi Mittal, Chairman of the ArcelorMittal steel company, and the balance of £3.1 million coming from the London Development Agency.