Archaic humans

archaic humanarchaic ''Homo sapiensarchaicArchaic Homo sapiensHomo sapiensarchaic homininsancient humansearliest humanshumansprehistoric human
A number of varieties of Homo are grouped into the broad category of archaic humans in the period contemporary to and predating the emergence of the earliest anatomically modern Homo sapiens over 200ka.wikipedia
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Homo

early humansearly humanhumans
A number of varieties of Homo are grouped into the broad category of archaic humans in the period contemporary to and predating the emergence of the earliest anatomically modern Homo sapiens over 200ka.
sapiens'' met with and interbred with archaic humans.

Homo heidelbergensis

H. heidelbergensisRhodesian ManH. rhodesiensis
The term typically includes Homo neanderthalensis (430+–25 ka), Denisovans, Homo rhodesiensis (300–125 ka), Homo heidelbergensis (600–200 ka), and Homo antecessor.
Homo heidelbergensis is an extinct species or subspecies of archaic humans in the genus Homo, which radiated in the Middle Pleistocene from about 700,000 to 300,000 years ago, known from fossils found in Southern Africa, East Africa and Europe.

Homo antecessor

H. antecessorEarly humans
The term typically includes Homo neanderthalensis (430+–25 ka), Denisovans, Homo rhodesiensis (300–125 ka), Homo heidelbergensis (600–200 ka), and Homo antecessor.
Homo antecessor is a proposed archaic human species of the Lower Paleolithic, known to have been present in Western Europe (Spain, England and France) between about 1.2 million and 0.8 million years ago (Mya).

Human taxonomy

Homo sapiens sapiensHomininasubspecies
There is no universal consensus on this terminology, and varieties of "archaic humans" are included under the binomial name of either Homo sapiens or Homo erectus by some authors.
The systematic genus, Homo, is designed to include both anatomically modern humans and extinct varieties of archaic humans.

Homo erectus

H. erectusDmanisi ManPithecanthropus erectus'' (later redesignated ''Homo erectus'')
There is no universal consensus on this terminology, and varieties of "archaic humans" are included under the binomial name of either Homo sapiens or Homo erectus by some authors.
Homo erectus (meaning 'upright man') is a species of archaic humans that lived throughout most of the Pleistocene geological epoch.

Horn of Africa

HornSomali peninsulanortheastern Africa
Anatomically modern humans appear around 200,000 years ago in the Horn of Africa and after 70,000 years ago (see Toba catastrophe theory), gradually supplanting the "archaic" human varieties.
According to both genetic and fossil evidence archaic humans evolved into anatomically modern humans in the Horn of Africa around 200,000 years ago and dispersed from the Horn of Africa.

Neanderthal

NeanderthalsHomo neanderthalensisNeanderthal man
The term typically includes Homo neanderthalensis (430+–25 ka), Denisovans, Homo rhodesiensis (300–125 ka), Homo heidelbergensis (600–200 ka), and Homo antecessor. Nonetheless, according to recent genetic studies, modern humans may have bred with "at least two groups" of ancient humans: Neanderthals and Denisovans.
Neanderthals (Neandertaler ; Homo neanderthalensis or Homo sapiens neanderthalensis), alternatively spelt as "Neandertals", are an extinct species or subspecies of archaic humans who lived in Eurasia until about 40,000 years ago (40 kya).

Denisovan

DenisovansDenisova homininHomo denisova
The term typically includes Homo neanderthalensis (430+–25 ka), Denisovans, Homo rhodesiensis (300–125 ka), Homo heidelbergensis (600–200 ka), and Homo antecessor. Nonetheless, according to recent genetic studies, modern humans may have bred with "at least two groups" of ancient humans: Neanderthals and Denisovans.
The Denisovans or Denisova hominins are an extinct species or subspecies of archaic humans in the genus Homo without an agreed taxonomic name.

Red Deer Cave people

Homo sp. longlinRed Deer Cave
Another group may also have been extant as recently as 11,500 years ago, the Red Deer Cave people of China.
The Red Deer Cave people were the most recent known prehistoric archaic human population.

Saldanha man

ElandsfonteinSaldanha craniumElandsfontein Fossil Beds
Saldanha man also known as Saldanha cranium or Elandsfontein cranium are fossilized remains of an archaic human.

Brow ridge

supraorbital ridgebrow ridgessuperciliary arches
Archaics are distinguished from anatomically modern humans by having a thick skull, prominent supraorbital ridges (brow ridges) and the lack of a prominent chin.
Early modern people like the finds from Jebel Irhoud and Skhul and Qafzeh had thick, large brow ridges, and also some living people, have quite pronounced brow ridges, but they differ from those of archaic humans like Neanderthals by having a supraorbital foramen or notch, forming a groove through the ridge above each eye, although there were exceptions, such as Skhul 2 who had unbroken frontal torus, unlike other members of her tribe.

Early human migrations

early human migrationpeopling of the worldearliest migration
This initial migration was followed by other archaic humans including H. heidelbergensis, which lived around 500,000 years ago and was the likely ancestor of both Denisovans and Neanderthals.

Homo sapiens

anatomically modern humanshumananatomically modern human
A number of varieties of Homo are grouped into the broad category of archaic humans in the period contemporary to and predating the emergence of the earliest anatomically modern Homo sapiens over 200ka. Anatomically modern humans appear around 200,000 years ago in the Horn of Africa and after 70,000 years ago (see Toba catastrophe theory), gradually supplanting the "archaic" human varieties. Omo-Kibish I (Omo I) from southern Ethiopia is the oldest anatomically modern Homo sapiens skeleton currently known (196 ± 5 ka). Nonetheless, according to recent genetic studies, modern humans may have bred with "at least two groups" of ancient humans: Neanderthals and Denisovans.
sapiens'' having an anatomy consistent with the range of phenotypes seen in contemporary humans from varieties of extinct archaic humans.

Ndutu cranium

Lake NdutuNdutu
According to Clarke, the Ndutu skull seemed to form a link between Homo erectus and archaic Homo sapiens, due to it having certain features in common with both.

Recent African origin of modern humans

out of AfricaOut of Africa theoryrecent African origin
sapiens and archaic humans in Eurasia and Oceania but not in Africa, which means that all non-African modern population groups, while mostly derived from early H.

Homo sapiens idaltu

Herto remainsH. s. idaltuH. sapiens idaltu
The earliest known fossils of anatomically modern humans such as the Omo remains from 195,000 years ago, Homo sapiens idaltu from 160,000 years ago, and Qafzeh remains from 90,000 years ago are recognizably modern humans.

Human evolution

evolutionearly manevolution of humans
Archaic Homo sapiens, the forerunner of anatomically modern humans, evolved in the Middle Paleolithic between 400,000 and 250,000 years ago.

Year

myaMay
A number of varieties of Homo are grouped into the broad category of archaic humans in the period contemporary to and predating the emergence of the earliest anatomically modern Homo sapiens over 200ka.

Ethiopia

EthiopianAbyssiniaFederal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia
Omo-Kibish I (Omo I) from southern Ethiopia is the oldest anatomically modern Homo sapiens skeleton currently known (196 ± 5 ka).

Homo rhodesiensis

H. rhodesiensisBroken Hill ManH. s. rhodesiensis
The term typically includes Homo neanderthalensis (430+–25 ka), Denisovans, Homo rhodesiensis (300–125 ka), Homo heidelbergensis (600–200 ka), and Homo antecessor.

Chin

cleft chindouble chincleft
Archaics are distinguished from anatomically modern humans by having a thick skull, prominent supraorbital ridges (brow ridges) and the lack of a prominent chin.

Toba catastrophe theory

Toba eruptionToba supereruptionToba catastrophe
Anatomically modern humans appear around 200,000 years ago in the Horn of Africa and after 70,000 years ago (see Toba catastrophe theory), gradually supplanting the "archaic" human varieties.

Genetics

geneticgeneticistgenetically
Nonetheless, according to recent genetic studies, modern humans may have bred with "at least two groups" of ancient humans: Neanderthals and Denisovans.

Chris Stringer

Christopher Brian StringerAncient Human Occupation of BritainChris B. Stringer
Chris Stringer of the Natural History Museum in London has suggested that these people could be a result of mating between Denisovans and modern humans.

Natural History Museum, London

Natural History MuseumBritish Museum of Natural HistoryBritish Museum (Natural History)
Chris Stringer of the Natural History Museum in London has suggested that these people could be a result of mating between Denisovans and modern humans.