Archibald MacLeish

Archibald McLeishMacLeishMacLeish, ArchibaldArchibald
Archibald MacLeish (May 7, 1892 – April 20, 1982) was an American poet and writer who was associated with the modernist school of poetry.wikipedia
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Fortune (magazine)

FortuneFortune MagazineFortune'' magazine
On returning to the United States, he contributed to Henry Luce's magazine Fortune from 1929 to 1938.
During the Great Depression, the magazine developed a reputation for its social conscience, for Walker Evans and Margaret Bourke-White's color photographs, and for a team of writers including James Agee, Archibald MacLeish, John Kenneth Galbraith, and Alfred Kazin, hired specifically for their writing abilities.

Panic (play)

PanicPanic'' (play)
By the 1930s, he considered Capitalism to be "symbolically dead" and wrote the verse play Panic (1935) in response.
Panic is a 1935 verse play by Archibald MacLeish.

Black Sun Press

While in Paris, Harry Crosby, publisher of the Black Sun Press, offered to publish MacLeish's poetry.
The Black Sun Press was an English language press noted for publishing the early works of many modernist writers including Hart Crane, D. H. Lawrence, Archibald MacLeish, Ernest Hemingway, and Eugene Jolas.

Kenneth MacLeish

Kenneth
His brother, Kenneth MacLeish was killed in action during the war.
MacLeish was the brother of Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Archibald MacLeish, and like him attended Yale College.

Andrew MacLeish

His father, Scottish-born Andrew MacLeish, worked as a dry goods merchant and was a founder of the Chicago department store Carson Pirie Scott.
Their son, Archibald became Librarian of Congress.

Choate, Hall & Stewart

He next spent three years practicing law with the Boston firm Choate, Hall & Stewart.
Poet Archibald MacLeish practiced at the firm for three years in the early 1920s.

Librarian of Congress

LibrarianLibrarian of the United States CongressOffice of the Librarian
For five years MacLeish was Librarian of Congress, a post he accepted at the urging of President Franklin D. Roosevelt. Soon afterward, MacLeish joined the retiring Librarian of Congress Herbert Putnam for a luncheon in New York.

Glencoe, Illinois

GlencoeGlencoe, ILWriters Theatre
MacLeish was born in Glencoe, Illinois.

Gerald and Sara Murphy

Gerald MurphySara Sherman WiborgGerald Clery Murphy
They also became part of the famed coterie of Riviera hosts Gerald and Sarah Murphy, which included Hemingway, Zelda and F. Scott Fitzgerald, John Dos Passos, Fernand Léger, Jean Cocteau, Pablo Picasso, John O'Hara, Cole Porter, Dorothy Parker and Robert Benchley.
Eventually they moved to the French Riviera, where they became the center of a large circle of artists and writers of later fame, especially Zelda and F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, John Dos Passos, Fernand Léger, Jean Cocteau, Pablo Picasso, Archibald MacLeish, John O'Hara, Cole Porter, Dorothy Parker and Robert Benchley.

Assistant Secretary of State for Public Affairs

Assistant Secretary for Public AffairsState Department spokesmanU.S. Assistant Secretary of State for Public Affairs
MacLeish resigned as Librarian of Congress on December 19, 1944, to take up the post of Assistant Secretary of State for Public Affairs.

Hotchkiss School

The Hotchkiss SchoolHotchkissHotchkiss Academy
He attended the Hotchkiss School from 1907 to 1911.

Library of Congress

The Library of CongressUnited States Library of CongressU.S. Library of Congress
A set of general principles on acquisitions was then developed to ensure that, though it was impossible to collect everything, the Library of Congress would acquire the bare minimum of canons to meet its mission.
When Putnam retired in 1939, President Franklin D. Roosevelt appointed Archibald MacLeish as his successor.

Harvard Law Review

Harv. L. Rev.Harvard Law Review AssociationLaw Review
He then enrolled in Harvard Law School, where he served as an editor of the Harvard Law Review.

Harry Crosby

HarryHenry Sturgis CrosbyHenry Grew Crosby
While in Paris, Harry Crosby, publisher of the Black Sun Press, offered to publish MacLeish's poetry.
and works by Hart Crane, D. H. Lawrence, Ezra Pound, Archibald MacLeish, Ernest Hemingway, Laurence Sterne, and Eugene Jolas.

J.B. (play)

J.B.JBJ. B.
In 1959 his play J.B. won the Pulitzer Prize for Drama.
J.B. is a 1958 play written in free verse by American playwright and poet Archibald MacLeish and is a modern retelling of the story of the biblical figure Job – hence the title: J.B./Job.

Lillian Hellman

Lillian HelmanHellmanLilian Hellman
Time magazine's Whittaker Chambers cited him as a fellow traveler in a 1941 article: "By 1938, U. S. Communists could count among their allies such names as Granville Hicks, Newton Arvin, Waldo Frank, Lewis Mumford, Matthew Josephson, Kyle Crichton (Robert Forsythe), Malcolm Cowley, Donald Ogden Stewart, Erskine Caldwell, Dorothy Parker, Archibald MacLeish, Lillian Hellman, Dashiell Hammett, John Steinbeck, George Soule, many another."
That same month she joined several other literary figures, including Dorothy Parker and Archibald MacLeish, in forming and funding Contemporary Historians, Inc., to back a film project, The Spanish Earth, to demonstrate support for the anti-Franco forces in the Spanish Civil War.

Chronicles: Volume One

ChroniclesChronicles, Vol. 1autobiography
Dylan describes their collaboration in the third chapter of his autobiography Chronicles, Vol. 1.
He also devoted chapters to two lesser-known albums, New Morning (1970) and Oh Mercy (1989), which contained insights into his collaborations with poet Archibald MacLeish and producer Daniel Lanois.

Pulitzer Prize for Drama

DramaPulitzer PrizePulitzer Prize-winning
In 1959 his play J.B. won the Pulitzer Prize for Drama.

The Fall of the City

The Fall of the City by Archibald MacLeish is the first American verse play written for radio.

Malcolm Cowley

Time magazine's Whittaker Chambers cited him as a fellow traveler in a 1941 article: "By 1938, U. S. Communists could count among their allies such names as Granville Hicks, Newton Arvin, Waldo Frank, Lewis Mumford, Matthew Josephson, Kyle Crichton (Robert Forsythe), Malcolm Cowley, Donald Ogden Stewart, Erskine Caldwell, Dorothy Parker, Archibald MacLeish, Lillian Hellman, Dashiell Hammett, John Steinbeck, George Soule, many another."
Other notable members included Archibald MacLeish, Upton Sinclair, Clifford Odets, Langston Hughes, Carl Sandburg, Carl Van Doren, Waldo Frank, David Ogden Stewart, John Dos Passos, Lillian Hellman, and Dashiell Hammett.

Conway, Massachusetts

ConwayConway, MA Conway
It was support from unexpected places, such as M. Llewellyn Raney of the University of Chicago libraries, which alleviated the ALA letter writing campaign against MacLeish's nomination." The main Republican argument against MacLeish's nomination from within Congress was that he was a poet and was a "fellow traveler" or sympathetic to communist causes. Calling to mind differences with the party he had over the years, MacLeish avowed that, "no one would be more shocked to learn I am a Communist than the Communists themselves." In Congress MacLeish's main advocate was Senate Majority Leader Alben Barkley, Democrat from Kentucky. With President Roosevelt's support and Senator Barkley's skillful defense in the United States Senate, victory in a roll call vote with 63 senators voting in favor of MacLeish's appointment was achieved. MacLeish was sworn in as Librarian of Congress on July 10, 1939, by the local postmaster at Conway, Massachusetts.

Herbert Putnam

George Herbert PutnamGeorge Putnam
Soon afterward, MacLeish joined the retiring Librarian of Congress Herbert Putnam for a luncheon in New York.
Herbert Putnam was succeeded in 1939 by Archibald MacLeish, who served from 1939 until 1944.

League of American Writers

Keep America Out of War CommitteeAmerican Writers CongressFirst American Writers Congress
Much of this was due to his involvement with left-wing organizations like the League of American Writers, and to his friendships with prominent left-wing writers.
A number of prominent writers were enlisted in the cause over the next several years, including Thomas Mann, John Steinbeck, Ernest Hemingway, Theodore Dreiser, James Farrell, Archibald MacLeish, Lillian Hellman, Nathanael West, Elsa Gidlow and William Carlos Williams.