Royal cortege leaving Rajagriha
Tomb of Shah Rukn-e-Alam (built 1320 to 1324) in Multan, Pakistan
Dashavatara Temple, Deogarh is a Vishnu Hindu temple built during the early 6th century, near the end of the Gupta period.
The Buland Darwaza gateway to Fatehpur Sikri, built by Akbar in 1601
The rock-cut Shore Temple of the temples in Mahabalipuram, Tamil Nadu, 700–728. Showing the typical dravida form of tower.
The Qutb Minar (left, begun c. 1200) next to the Alai Darwaza gatehouse (1311); Qutb Complex in Delhi
Hindu Temple basic floor design
Mausoleum of Iltutmish, Delhi, by 1236, with corbel arches
The ninth century temple in Barakar shows a tall curving shikhara crowned by a large amalaka and is an example of the early Pala style. It is similar to contemporaneous temples of Odisha.
Tomb of Ghiyath al-Din Tughluq (d. 1325), Delhi
Drawing of a pancharatha (5 ratha) plan of subsidiary shrines of Brahmeswara Temple
Arches in the main mosque at Gulbarga, 1367
Palitana Jain Temples
Choto Sona Mosque (around 1500)
Jain Temple complex, Deogarh, Uttar Pradesh, before 862
Interior of the hypostyle hall of the Adina Mosque
Temple ceiling of Ranakpur Jain Temple, Rajasthan
Kevada Mosque, Champaner
The Charminar, built in the 16th century by the Golconda Sultanate
Aali Masjid in Srinagar, Kashmir.
Tomb of Muhammad Shah, Lodi Gardens
Humayun's Tomb, Delhi, the first fully developed Mughal imperial tomb, 1569-70
Qutb complex
King's Gate at Fatehpur Sikri, near Agra
Burial place of Ibrahim Adil Shah II
The Taj Mahal in Agra, India, widely considered the pinnacle of Islamic architecture in the subcontinent.
Tombs beside Tomb of Fatima Khanam
The Rumi Darwaza in Lucknow, 1784, from the rear, during flooding.
Firoze Minar at Gaur
Screen of the Adhai Din Ka Jhonpra mosque, Ajmer, c. 1229; Corbel arches, some cusped.
Interior of the hypostyle hall of the Adina Mosque
Possibly the first "true" arches in India; Tomb of Balban (d. 1287) in Delhi
Jama Masjid, Srinagar
Pavilions in the Hauz Khas Complex, Delhi
The Golden Temple in Amritsar
Tomb of Sikander Lodi in the Lodi Gardens, Delhi
Gurdwara Baba Atal is a 17th-century nine-storeyed Gurudwara in Amritsar
Mahmud Gawan Madrasa (begun construction in the 1460s).
Shaniwarwada palace fort in Pune.
Jama Mosque Gulbarga (b. 1367), pictured in 1880.
Kee monastery, Spiti
"Double" tomb of Taj ud-Din Firuz Shah (d. 1422), in Gulbarga
Cluster of temples in Bishnupur
A row of Bahminid tombs at Ashtur, Bidar
Thakur Dalan of Itachuna Rajbari at Khanyan
Gol Gumbaz built by the Bijapur Sultanate in Deccani style, the world's 2nd largest pre-modern dome following the Hagia Sophia in Istanbul.
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Charminar at the Old City in Hyderabad, 1591
Lotus Temple, Delhi Fariborz Sahba
Makkah Masjid, Hyderabad
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Char Kaman in Hyderabad
Bimbisara visiting a bamboo garden in Rajagriha
Hayat Bakshi Mosque in Hyderabad
Pari Mahal
Khairtabad Mosque
Pointed arch, Mahabodhi temple, 6th–7th century CE, Late-Gupta period
Shat Gombuj (Sixty Dome) Mosque in Bagerhat, Bangladesh
Arches of Diwan-i-Khas, Red Fort, Delhi
Interior of the Shat Gambuj Mosque
Nav Toran Temple, Neemuch, Madhya Pradesh
Ruined mihrabs and arabesque inside Darasbari Mosque, 15th-century
Po Klong Garai Temple near Phan Rang
Terracotta arabesque on the wall of Khania Dighi Mosque, Gauda, 15th-century
Angkor Wat
Multi-domed Pathrail Mosque, 15th-century
Wat Chaiwatthanaram, an example of Thai style prang
Single-domed Eklakhi Mausoleum, early 15th-century
Masjid Ubudiah, showcasing elements of Indo-Saracenic style
Firoz Minar, Gauda, 1480s
Temples in Bagan
Corner tower with arabesque on Choto Sona Mosque, late 15th and early 16th centuries
Ananda Temple terracotta plaque glazed in green
Dakhil Doorway, Gauda, 16th-century
numerous rock-cut equivalents
Jama Mosque, Champaner
A tetrastyle prostyle Gupta period temple at Sanchi besides the Apsidal hall with Maurya foundation, an example of Buddhist architecture. 5th century CE.
Jama Mosque, Ahmedabad (the upper parts of the minarets at the entrance now lost).
The Hindu Tigawa Temple, early 5th century.
Teen Darwaza (Three-Gate) entrance to Ahmedabad
The current structure of the Mahabodhi Temple dates to the Gupta era, 5th century CE. Marking the location where the Buddha is said to have attained enlightenment.
Sarkhej Roza complex, Ahmedabad
Vishnu temple in Eran, 5th-6th century
alt=Sidi Bashir Mosque|Sidi Bashir Mosque, Ahmedabad
The Buddhagupta pillar at Eran (c.476–495 CE)
Jali at the Sidi Sayyid Mosque
Detailed carving of elephant, Ranakpur Jain Temple
Bhadra Fort, Ahmedabad
Rani Ki Vav, Gujrat
Dada Harir Stepwell, Ahmedabad
Somanath Temple
Interior of Jami Mosque, Khambhat
Adalaj stepwell
Jamia Masjid in Srinagar, Kashmir.
Taranga Jain Temple, Gujrat
Interior of the Jamia Masjid.
Safdarjung's Tomb is built in the late Mughal style for Nawab Safdarjung. The tomb is described as the “last flicker in the lamp of Mughal architecture”
Khanqah-e-Moula in Srinagar, Kashmir
Tomb of I'timād-ud-Daulah is a Mughal mausoleum in Agra.It is noticeable for the first use of pietra dura technique. The tomb is often regarded as a draft of the Taj Mahal.
Tomb of Zain-ul-Abedin's mother in Srinagar, Kashmir.
Shalimar Bagh is a Mughal garden in Srinagar, linked through a channel to the northeast of Dal Lake. The Bagh is considered the high point of Mughal horticulture.
Chaqchan Mosque in Khaplu, Gilgit-Baltistan
Akbar's Tomb, Agra. Built with red sandstone by his son and grandson in 1605 to 1618.
Amburiq Mosque in Gilgit-Baltistan.
Humayun's Tomb, Delhi, the first fully developed Mughal imperial tomb, 1569–70 CE<ref>{{Cite web|url=https://whc.unesco.org/en/list/232/|title=Humayun's Tomb, Delhi|website=UNESCO World Heritage Centre|language=en|archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20190228192141/https://whc.unesco.org/en/list/232/|archive-date=2019-02-28|url-status=live|access-date=2019-02-28}}</ref>
The use of elephant-shaped column brackets in buildings of the Lahore Fort reflects Hindu influences on Mughal Architecture during the reign of Akbar.
Stupas in Thikse Monastery
The Darwaza-i-Rauza (Great Gate) of the Taj Mahal.
Ralang Monastery, Sikkim
Jama Masjid, Delhi, one of the largest mosques in India.
Tawang Monastery, Arunachal Pradesh
Lahori Gate of the Red Fort, Delhi, India.
Tawang Monastery assembly hall
Tomb of Nithar Begum at Khusro Bagh, Allahabad, India.
Prayer hall at the Golden Temple in Bylakuppe, a Tibetan settlement in Karnataka
Akbar's Tomb at Agra, India uses red sandstone and white marble, like many of the Mughal monuments. The Taj Mahal is a notable exception, as it uses only marble.
The Chandannagar Strand Ghat, reminiscences of a French colony, Chandannagar, West Bengal
Bibi Ka Maqbara is a tomb located in Aurangabad, Maharashtra, India, which was built by Mughal emperor Aurangzeb's son Azam Shah in the memory of his mother.
Fort Dansborg, built by the 17th century Danish admiral Ove Gjedde, reminiscences of Danish India, Tharangambadi, Tamil Nadu
Badshahi mosque in Lahore, Pakistan, late Mughal, built 1673–1674.
Tomb of Susanna Anna Maria, reminisces of Dutch India, Chinsurah, West Bengal
One of the Tombs of Ustad-Shagird, Nakodar, India.
Church Of St Francis Of Assisi, reminisce of Portuguese India, Goa
Shalimar Garden in Lahore, Pakistan
French Quarter, Pondicherry. The city became the chief French settlement in India.
Nishat Bagh, Srinagar
Lal Bagh, Bengaluru
View of the Mughal Garden of Rashtrapati Bhavan
Waterfall at Rock Garden, Chandigarh
Char Bagh Garden, Rajasthan
The Athpula (eight piers) bridge in Lodi gardens

Among a number of architectural styles and traditions, the best-known include the many varieties of Hindu temple architecture, Indo-Islamic architecture, especially Mughal architecture, Rajput architecture and Indo-Saracenic architecture.

- Architecture of India

Indo-Islamic architecture has left a large impact on modern Indian, Pakistani and Bangladeshi architecture, as in the case of its influence on the Indo-Saracenic Revivalism of the late British Raj.

- Indo-Islamic architecture
Royal cortege leaving Rajagriha

6 related topics

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Memorial chhatri of Jat Rana Udaybhanu Singh Maharaj at Dholpur, Rajasthan, India.

Chhatri

Memorial chhatri of Jat Rana Udaybhanu Singh Maharaj at Dholpur, Rajasthan, India.
Chhatri set atop each corner of the Hall of Audience in Fatehpur Sikri palace complex.
Chhatri of Vithoji in Maheshwar.
Rao Lakhaji Chhatri Bhuj
Chhatri of Ram Mohan Roy in Arnos Vale Cemetery, Bristol, England
A 12th-century chatri, Jaisalmir
Bada Bagh at Jaisalmer
Chhatri at Rajgarh, Rajasthan
Moosi Rani Ki Chhatri, Alwar
Barah Khamba Chhatri at Jalsen Talab in Hindaun

Chhatri are elevated, dome-shaped pavilions used as an element in Indo-Islamic architecture and Indian architecture.

The Taj Mahal at Agra, Uttar Pradesh, India is the most famous example of Mughal Architecture and one of India's most recognisable landmarks in general,

Mughal architecture

The Taj Mahal at Agra, Uttar Pradesh, India is the most famous example of Mughal Architecture and one of India's most recognisable landmarks in general,
Badshahi Mosque, in Lahore, Pakistan was the largest mosque in the world for 313 years, and is the last of the imperial mosques built by the Mughals
The Alamgiri Gate at Lahore Fort, Lahore, Pakistan, was named for Aurangzeb, who was sometimes referred to as "Alamgir".
Bibi Ka Maqbara is a tomb in Aurangabad, Maharashtra, which was built by Aurangzeb in the memory of his wife, Dilras Banu Begum
The use of elephant-shaped column brackets at Lahore Fort reflects Hindu influences on Mughal Architecture during the reign of Akbar
Gardens of Babur in Kabul, Afghanistan.
Islamia White Mosque
Humayun's Tomb, Delhi, India
Buland Darwaza, Agra was built by Akbar the Great to commemorate his victory.
The tomb of Shaikh Salim Chisti is considered to be one of the finest examples of Mughal architecture
Begum Shahi Mosque is Lahore's earliest dated Mughal period mosque
The tomb of I'timād-ud-Daulah is often regarded as a draft of the Tāj Mahal.
The Tomb of Jahangir at Lahore does not have a dome as Jahangir forbade construction of a dome over his tomb.
Wazir Khan Mosque in Lahore, Pakistan, is considered to be the most ornately decorated Mughal-era mosque
The Shalimar Gardens, Lahore are among the most famous Mughal gardens.
The mosque's tile work exhibits Timurid influences introduced during Shah Jahan's campaigns in Central Asia.
The central chamber of the Shahi Hammam is decorated with frescoes
Badshahi Masjid, Lahore, Pakistan was the largest mosque in the world for 313 years, and is now the second-largest mosque in the Indian subcontinent.
Lalbagh Fort in Dhaka is an incomplete fort built by Prince Azam Shah
The 18th-century Sunehri Mosque is named for its gilded domes.
The Darwaza-i-Rauza (Great Gate) of the Taj Mahal.
Jali decorative work at the Tomb of Salim Chishti, Fatehpur Sikri.
Lahori Gate of the Red Fort, Delhi, India.
Jahangir's grave at the Tomb of Jahangir, decorated with parchin kari work.
Tomb of Nithar Begum at Khusro Bagh, Allahabad, India.
The shahada in Arabic calligraphy at the Wazir Khan Mosque, Lahore, Pakistan.
Akbar's Tomb at Agra, India uses red sandstone and white marble, like many of the Mughal monuments. The Taj Mahal is a notable exception, as it uses only marble.
Diwan-i-Khas (Hall of private audience) at Lahore Fort.
Shah Jahan Mosque in Thatta, Pakistan. The mosque is not built in the Mughal style, but reflects a heavy Persian influence.
One of the Tombs of Ustad-Shagird, Nakodar, India.

Mughal architecture is the type of Indo-Islamic architecture developed by the Mughals in the 16th, 17th and 18th centuries throughout the ever-changing extent of their empire in the Indian subcontinent.

It also further incorporated and syncretized influences from wider Indian architecture, especially during the reign of Akbar (r.

Panoramic view of mosque in the daylight

Humayun's Tomb

Tomb of the Mughal Emperor Humayun in Delhi, India.

Tomb of the Mughal Emperor Humayun in Delhi, India.

Panoramic view of mosque in the daylight
Mughal Emperor, Humayun r. 1508–1556
Capture of the last Mughal emperor Bahadur Shah Zafar and his sons by William Hodson at Humayun's tomb in September 1857
Floor plan of tomb structure of Humayun's Tomb
Humayun's cenotaph
Ceiling of entrance chamber inside
Humayun's Tomb Garden Enclosure Plan
Tomb of Barber(Nai Ka Gumbad)
Chillah Nizamuddin
Isa Khan Niyazi's Tomb, dating 1547
Bu Halima's Garden and tomb view
Nila Gumbad ca 1625–6, built by courtier Abdul Rahim Khan-I-Khana, for his servant Fahim Khan
Restoration work at Humayun's tomb, required removal of 3000 truckloads (12,000 cubic meters) of earth, and special chute installed at the back, from the roof (2008)
View of the Southwestern Corner of Humayun's Tomb
A reflection
Six-pointed Stars on One of Humayun's Tomb's Pishtaqs
Cenotaphs of Hamida Banu Begum, Dara Shikoh etc. in a side room
A jali mihrab indicates the qibla direction while one stands inside Humayun's cenotaph's chamber and looks to the west.
Humayun's Tomb Seen from Inside the West Gate
The Western Facade of the West Gate at Humayun's Tomb
Isa Khan's mosque, across his tomb, also built ca 1547 CE, near Humayun's tomb
Gateway into Araba Sarai, south to the pathway towards Humayun's tomb
Afsarwala tomb located near Humayun Tomb
Tomb of Humayun, with his barber's tomb (Nai-ka-Gumbad) in the foreground, Delhi (1858 photograph)
English garden-style roundabouts replaced the square central tanks of the Charbagh garden in 1860
Humayun's Tomb at night
A side view of Humayun's Tomb

North India was successively ruled by foreign dynasties in the coming centuries, giving rise to the Indo-Islamic architecture.

The building was the first to use its unique combination of red sandstone and white marble, and includes several elements of Indian architecture, like the small canopies or chhatris surrounding the central dome, popular in Rajasthani architecture and which were originally covered with blue tiles.

The British-era Islamia College was built in an Indo-Saracenic Revival architectural style in Peshawar, Pakistan.

Indo-Saracenic architecture

Revivalist architectural style mostly used by British architects in India in the later 19th century, especially in public and government buildings in the British Raj, and the palaces of rulers of the princely states.

Revivalist architectural style mostly used by British architects in India in the later 19th century, especially in public and government buildings in the British Raj, and the palaces of rulers of the princely states.

The British-era Islamia College was built in an Indo-Saracenic Revival architectural style in Peshawar, Pakistan.
The Rambagh Palace in Jaipur reflecting Imperial Rajasthani architecture. Early 20th-century.
Aitchison College in Lahore with domed chhatris, jalis, chhajja below the balcony, and other features, reflective of Rajasthani architecture.
Vidhana Soudha, Bangalore incorporates elements of Indo-Saracenic and Dravidian styles. Constructed 1951–1956.
Sultan Abdul Samad Building in Kuala Lumpur
Kuala Lumpur Railway Station, by Arthur Benison Hubback, 1910.
General Post Office (GPO), Kolkata
Ujjayanta Palace, Agartala
Esplanade Mansion, Kolkata
Building on B.B.D. Bagh, Kolkata
Metropolitan Building Façade, Kolkata
Albert Hall Museum, Jaipur
Jenkins School, Cooch Behar
Cooch Behar Palace, West Bengal
Ubudiah Mosque (Hubback, 1913), Kuala Kangsar, Perak
Jubilee Clock Tower in George Town, Penang
National Textile Museum in Kuala Lumpur, by Hubback, 1905. Originally as offices for the Federated Malay States Railways.
The Old High Court Building in Kuala Lumpur
Old Kuala Lumpur Town Hall, Hubback, 1896-1904
Jamek Mosque in Kuala Lumpur, by Hubback
Railway Administration Building, Kuala Lumpur
Kellie's Castle, Batu Gajah, Perak
The Gateway of India
The Taj Mahal Hotel in Mumbai
Southern Railway Headquarters, Chennai
Mysore Palace
The National Art Gallery (Chennai)
Victoria Public Hall in Chennai
Senate House (University of Madras)
Mumbai GPO, reminiscent of the Gol Gumbaz
Khalsa College, Amritsar
Daly College, Indore
Chepauk Palace, Chennai
Kachiguda Railway Station, Hyderabad
Lucknow Charbagh Railway Station
Raj Bhavan (backview), Kolkata
Howrah Railway Station
Ahsan Manzil in Dhaka
Curzon Hall in Dhaka
Tajhat Palace in Rangpur
Natore Rajbari
Rose Garden Palace
Uttara Gonobhaban
Murapara Rajbari
Puthia Rajbari
Bangladesh Folk Arts and Crafts Foundation
Chittagong Court Building
Lahore Museum, Lahore
Karachi Metropolitan Corporation Building, Karachi, 1927-30
University of the Punjab, Lahore
Sadiq Dane High School, Bahawalpur
Patiala Block of King Edward Medical University, Lahore
Karachi Chamber of Commerce Building
Darbar Mahal, Bahawalpur
Multan Clock Tower, Multan
National Academy of Performing Arts, Karachi
Sezincote House, Gloucestershire, 1805
Royal Pavilion in Brighton, 1815–23
Western Pavilion in Brighton, 1828, designed by Amon Henry Wilds as his own home
Elephant Tea Rooms, Sunderland, 1877
Sassoon Mausoleum, now a chic Brighton supper club, 1892
Jami Ul-Alfar Mosque in Colombo
Jaffna Public Library in Jaffna
Jaffna Clock Tower in Jaffna
Original Honkan, Tokyo National Museum, by Josiah Conder, largely destroyed by an earthquake in 1923
Palais du Bardo, parc Montsouris, Paris

It drew stylistic and decorative elements from native Indo-Islamic architecture, especially Mughal architecture, which the British regarded as the classic Indian style, and, less often, from Hindu temple architecture.

By doing this they kept Indian architecture while adding elements of British and European architecture; this, coupled with the British allowing some regional Indian princes to stay in power under agreements, made their presence more "palatable" for the Indians.

Islam in India

India's second-largest religion, with 14.2% of the country's population, approximately 172.2 million people identifying as adherents of Islam in 2011 Census.

India's second-largest religion, with 14.2% of the country's population, approximately 172.2 million people identifying as adherents of Islam in 2011 Census.

Names, routes and locations of the Periplus of the Erythraean Sea (1st century CE)
Cheraman Perumal Juma Masjid on the Malabar Coast, probably the first Mosque in India.
The Taj Mahal in Agra, India. It was built under Mughal emperor Shah Jahan in the 17th century, and represents Indo-Islamic architecture.
Muslim woman clad in fine Bengali muslin, in 18th-century Dhaka, Bengal Subah.
Maulana Azad was a prominent leader of the Indian independence movement and a strong advocate of Hindu-Muslim unity. Shown here is Azad (left) with Sardar Patel and Mahatma Gandhi in 1940.
The Partition of British India was based on religion. The negotiations failed several times, with differing demands about boundaries, as shown in this map of 1946.
Khan Abdul Ghaffar Khan with Gandhi in 1930. Also known as Frontier Gandhi, Khan led the non-violent opposition against the British Raj and strongly opposed the partition of India.
A train of Muslim refugees in India leaving for Pakistan
Mausoleum of 1 st Wali–ul–Hind:Moulai Abadullah, Khambat, Gujarat, era 1050–1100 CE.
Dawoodi Bohra 53rd Dai Syedna Mufaddal Saifuddin, with Dawat office at Mumbai.
Tomb of Sufi saint Shaikh Salim Chisti in Fatehpur Sikri, Uttar Pradesh
Mirza Ghulam Ahmad, founder of the Ahmadiyya movement
An outside view of the Maqbara.
Aligarh Muslim University
[[All India Ulema and Mashaikh Board|AIUMB
]] protest against caricature of Prophet of Islam in the city of Sambhal, Uttar Pradesh, India.
Char Minar at Old City in Hyderabad.
Ruins of the Surya Temple at Martand, which was destroyed due to the iconoclastic policies of Sikandar Butshikan, photo taken by John Burke in 1868.
Muslim homes and businesses burned during the 2020 Delhi riots.
The skyline of Ahmedabad filled with smoke as buildings and shops are set on fire by rioting mobs. The riots, which took place following the Godhra train burning incident, killed more than 790 Muslims and 254 Hindus, including those killed in the Godhra train fire. These figures were reported to the Rajya Sabha by the Union Minister of State for Home Affairs Sriprakash Jaiswal in May 2005.
The Jamalabad fort route. Mangalorean Catholics had travelled through this route on their way to Srirangapatna.
Azim Premji, CEO of India's 3rd largest IT company Wipro Technologies and the 5th richest man in India with an estimated fortune of US$17.1 billion
The Taj Mahal in Agra is one of India's most iconic monuments.
A rebuilt structure of the old Cheraman Juma Mosque, Kerala, which is often considered as the first Masjid of India
Asafi Imambargah, also known as Bara Imambara at Lucknow
The Humayun's Tomb in Delhi
Gol Gumbaz at Bijapur, Karnataka, has the second largest pre-modern dome in the world after the Byzantine Hagia Sophia.
Bahauddin Makbara, mausoleum of the Wazir of Junagadh, Gujarat
400-year-old Makkah Masjid, Hyderabad. (Photo: 1885)
The Asafi Mosque within the Asafi Imambargah Complex at Lucknow
The Rumi Darwaza at Lucknow
Gole-Gumma, Mousoleum of Nawab Wahab Khan, Kurnool, Andhra Pradesh
Charminar, the most famous of the monuments of Hyderabad
Red Fort, Delhi
Jama Masjid, Delhi, one of the largest mosques in India

The time period of their rule included the earliest forms of Indo-Islamic architecture, increased growth rates in India's population and economy, and the emergence of the Hindustani language.

Architecture of India took new shape with the advent of Islamic rule in India towards the end of the 12th century CE.

Jali screens in the tomb of Akbar the Great near Agra, India

Jali

Term for a perforated stone or latticed screen, usually with an ornamental pattern constructed through the use of calligraphy, geometry or natural patterns.

Term for a perforated stone or latticed screen, usually with an ornamental pattern constructed through the use of calligraphy, geometry or natural patterns.

Jali screens in the tomb of Akbar the Great near Agra, India
Nachna Parvati-Temple Jali, Gupta period
Pattadakal window
another window at Pattadakal
Pattadakal Virupaksa temple window
Chola temple
thumb|Window at Alai Darwaza, Qutb complex
Jali in Sidi Saiyyed mosque in Ahmedabad exhibiting traditional Indian tree of life motif
Jali at Tomb of Salim Chishti, Fatehpur Sikri shows Islamic geometric patterns developed in western asia
Details of marble Jali screens around royal cenotaphs, Taj Mahal
Jali at Bibi Ka Maqbara, Aurangabad with typical Indian motifs
Jali at Champaner utilize traditional indian geometric patterns and Islamic geometry
thumb|Jalis in Mohammad Gaus Tomb Gwalior
19th century houses in Gwalior

This form of architectural decoration is common in Indo-Islamic architecture and more generally in Indian architecture.