Architecture of India

Royal cortege leaving Rajagriha
Dashavatara Temple, Deogarh is a Vishnu Hindu temple built during the early 6th century, near the end of the Gupta period.
The rock-cut Shore Temple of the temples in Mahabalipuram, Tamil Nadu, 700–728. Showing the typical dravida form of tower.
Hindu Temple basic floor design
The ninth century temple in Barakar shows a tall curving shikhara crowned by a large amalaka and is an example of the early Pala style. It is similar to contemporaneous temples of Odisha.
Drawing of a pancharatha (5 ratha) plan of subsidiary shrines of Brahmeswara Temple
Palitana Jain Temples
Jain Temple complex, Deogarh, Uttar Pradesh, before 862
Temple ceiling of Ranakpur Jain Temple, Rajasthan
The Charminar, built in the 16th century by the Golconda Sultanate
Tomb of Muhammad Shah, Lodi Gardens
Qutb complex
Burial place of Ibrahim Adil Shah II
Tombs beside Tomb of Fatima Khanam
Firoze Minar at Gaur
Interior of the hypostyle hall of the Adina Mosque
Jama Masjid, Srinagar
The Golden Temple in Amritsar
Gurdwara Baba Atal is a 17th-century nine-storeyed Gurudwara in Amritsar
Shaniwarwada palace fort in Pune.
Kee monastery, Spiti
Cluster of temples in Bishnupur
Thakur Dalan of Itachuna Rajbari at Khanyan
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Lotus Temple, Delhi Fariborz Sahba
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Bimbisara visiting a bamboo garden in Rajagriha
Pari Mahal
Pointed arch, Mahabodhi temple, 6th–7th century CE, Late-Gupta period
Arches of Diwan-i-Khas, Red Fort, Delhi
Nav Toran Temple, Neemuch, Madhya Pradesh
Po Klong Garai Temple near Phan Rang
Angkor Wat
Wat Chaiwatthanaram, an example of Thai style prang
Masjid Ubudiah, showcasing elements of Indo-Saracenic style
Temples in Bagan
Ananda Temple terracotta plaque glazed in green
numerous rock-cut equivalents
A tetrastyle prostyle Gupta period temple at Sanchi besides the Apsidal hall with Maurya foundation, an example of Buddhist architecture. 5th century CE.
The Hindu Tigawa Temple, early 5th century.
The current structure of the Mahabodhi Temple dates to the Gupta era, 5th century CE. Marking the location where the Buddha is said to have attained enlightenment.
Vishnu temple in Eran, 5th-6th century
The Buddhagupta pillar at Eran (c.476–495 CE)
Detailed carving of elephant, Ranakpur Jain Temple
Rani Ki Vav, Gujrat
Somanath Temple
Adalaj stepwell
Taranga Jain Temple, Gujrat
Safdarjung's Tomb is built in the late Mughal style for Nawab Safdarjung. The tomb is described as the “last flicker in the lamp of Mughal architecture”
Tomb of I'timād-ud-Daulah is a Mughal mausoleum in Agra.It is noticeable for the first use of pietra dura technique. The tomb is often regarded as a draft of the Taj Mahal.
Shalimar Bagh is a Mughal garden in Srinagar, linked through a channel to the northeast of Dal Lake. The Bagh is considered the high point of Mughal horticulture.
Akbar's Tomb, Agra. Built with red sandstone by his son and grandson in 1605 to 1618.
Humayun's Tomb, Delhi, the first fully developed Mughal imperial tomb, 1569–70 CE<ref>{{Cite web|url=https://whc.unesco.org/en/list/232/|title=Humayun's Tomb, Delhi|website=UNESCO World Heritage Centre|language=en|archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20190228192141/https://whc.unesco.org/en/list/232/|archive-date=2019-02-28|url-status=live|access-date=2019-02-28}}</ref>
Stupas in Thikse Monastery
Ralang Monastery, Sikkim
Tawang Monastery, Arunachal Pradesh
Tawang Monastery assembly hall
Prayer hall at the Golden Temple in Bylakuppe, a Tibetan settlement in Karnataka
The Chandannagar Strand Ghat, reminiscences of a French colony, Chandannagar, West Bengal
Fort Dansborg, built by the 17th century Danish admiral Ove Gjedde, reminiscences of Danish India, Tharangambadi, Tamil Nadu
Tomb of Susanna Anna Maria, reminisces of Dutch India, Chinsurah, West Bengal
Church Of St Francis Of Assisi, reminisce of Portuguese India, Goa
French Quarter, Pondicherry. The city became the chief French settlement in India.
Nishat Bagh, Srinagar
Lal Bagh, Bengaluru
View of the Mughal Garden of Rashtrapati Bhavan
Waterfall at Rock Garden, Chandigarh
Char Bagh Garden, Rajasthan
The Athpula (eight piers) bridge in Lodi gardens

Rooted in its history, culture and religion.

- Architecture of India
Royal cortege leaving Rajagriha

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Tomb of Shah Rukn-e-Alam (built 1320 to 1324) in Multan, Pakistan

Indo-Islamic architecture

Architecture of the Indian subcontinent produced by and for Islamic patrons and purposes.

Architecture of the Indian subcontinent produced by and for Islamic patrons and purposes.

Tomb of Shah Rukn-e-Alam (built 1320 to 1324) in Multan, Pakistan
The Buland Darwaza gateway to Fatehpur Sikri, built by Akbar in 1601
The Qutb Minar (left, begun c. 1200) next to the Alai Darwaza gatehouse (1311); Qutb Complex in Delhi
Mausoleum of Iltutmish, Delhi, by 1236, with corbel arches
Tomb of Ghiyath al-Din Tughluq (d. 1325), Delhi
Arches in the main mosque at Gulbarga, 1367
Choto Sona Mosque (around 1500)
Interior of the hypostyle hall of the Adina Mosque
Kevada Mosque, Champaner
Aali Masjid in Srinagar, Kashmir.
Humayun's Tomb, Delhi, the first fully developed Mughal imperial tomb, 1569-70
King's Gate at Fatehpur Sikri, near Agra
The Taj Mahal in Agra, India, widely considered the pinnacle of Islamic architecture in the subcontinent.
The Rumi Darwaza in Lucknow, 1784, from the rear, during flooding.
Screen of the Adhai Din Ka Jhonpra mosque, Ajmer, c. 1229; Corbel arches, some cusped.
Possibly the first "true" arches in India; Tomb of Balban (d. 1287) in Delhi
Pavilions in the Hauz Khas Complex, Delhi
Tomb of Sikander Lodi in the Lodi Gardens, Delhi
Mahmud Gawan Madrasa (begun construction in the 1460s).
Jama Mosque Gulbarga (b. 1367), pictured in 1880.
"Double" tomb of Taj ud-Din Firuz Shah (d. 1422), in Gulbarga
A row of Bahminid tombs at Ashtur, Bidar
Gol Gumbaz built by the Bijapur Sultanate in Deccani style, the world's 2nd largest pre-modern dome following the Hagia Sophia in Istanbul.
Charminar at the Old City in Hyderabad, 1591
Makkah Masjid, Hyderabad
Char Kaman in Hyderabad
Hayat Bakshi Mosque in Hyderabad
Khairtabad Mosque
Shat Gombuj (Sixty Dome) Mosque in Bagerhat, Bangladesh
Interior of the Shat Gambuj Mosque
Ruined mihrabs and arabesque inside Darasbari Mosque, 15th-century
Terracotta arabesque on the wall of Khania Dighi Mosque, Gauda, 15th-century
Multi-domed Pathrail Mosque, 15th-century
Single-domed Eklakhi Mausoleum, early 15th-century
Firoz Minar, Gauda, 1480s
Corner tower with arabesque on Choto Sona Mosque, late 15th and early 16th centuries
Dakhil Doorway, Gauda, 16th-century
Jama Mosque, Champaner
Jama Mosque, Ahmedabad (the upper parts of the minarets at the entrance now lost).
Teen Darwaza (Three-Gate) entrance to Ahmedabad
Sarkhej Roza complex, Ahmedabad
alt=Sidi Bashir Mosque|Sidi Bashir Mosque, Ahmedabad
Jali at the Sidi Sayyid Mosque
Bhadra Fort, Ahmedabad
Dada Harir Stepwell, Ahmedabad
Interior of Jami Mosque, Khambhat
Jamia Masjid in Srinagar, Kashmir.
Interior of the Jamia Masjid.
Khanqah-e-Moula in Srinagar, Kashmir
Tomb of Zain-ul-Abedin's mother in Srinagar, Kashmir.
Chaqchan Mosque in Khaplu, Gilgit-Baltistan
Amburiq Mosque in Gilgit-Baltistan.
The use of elephant-shaped column brackets in buildings of the Lahore Fort reflects Hindu influences on Mughal Architecture during the reign of Akbar.
The Darwaza-i-Rauza (Great Gate) of the Taj Mahal.
Jama Masjid, Delhi, one of the largest mosques in India.
Lahori Gate of the Red Fort, Delhi, India.
Tomb of Nithar Begum at Khusro Bagh, Allahabad, India.
Akbar's Tomb at Agra, India uses red sandstone and white marble, like many of the Mughal monuments. The Taj Mahal is a notable exception, as it uses only marble.
Bibi Ka Maqbara is a tomb located in Aurangabad, Maharashtra, India, which was built by Mughal emperor Aurangzeb's son Azam Shah in the memory of his mother.
Badshahi mosque in Lahore, Pakistan, late Mughal, built 1673–1674.
One of the Tombs of Ustad-Shagird, Nakodar, India.
Shalimar Garden in Lahore, Pakistan

Indo-Islamic architecture has left a large impact on modern Indian, Pakistani and Bangladeshi architecture, as in the case of its influence on the Indo-Saracenic Revivalism of the late British Raj.

The Taj Mahal at Agra, Uttar Pradesh, India is the most famous example of Mughal Architecture and one of India's most recognisable landmarks in general,

Mughal architecture

Type of Indo-Islamic architecture developed by the Mughals in the 16th, 17th and 18th centuries throughout the ever-changing extent of their empire in the Indian subcontinent.

Type of Indo-Islamic architecture developed by the Mughals in the 16th, 17th and 18th centuries throughout the ever-changing extent of their empire in the Indian subcontinent.

The Taj Mahal at Agra, Uttar Pradesh, India is the most famous example of Mughal Architecture and one of India's most recognisable landmarks in general,
Badshahi Mosque, in Lahore, Pakistan was the largest mosque in the world for 313 years, and is the last of the imperial mosques built by the Mughals
The Alamgiri Gate at Lahore Fort, Lahore, Pakistan, was named for Aurangzeb, who was sometimes referred to as "Alamgir".
Bibi Ka Maqbara is a tomb in Aurangabad, Maharashtra, which was built by Aurangzeb in the memory of his wife, Dilras Banu Begum
The use of elephant-shaped column brackets at Lahore Fort reflects Hindu influences on Mughal Architecture during the reign of Akbar
Gardens of Babur in Kabul, Afghanistan.
Islamia White Mosque
Humayun's Tomb, Delhi, India
Buland Darwaza, Agra was built by Akbar the Great to commemorate his victory.
The tomb of Shaikh Salim Chisti is considered to be one of the finest examples of Mughal architecture
Begum Shahi Mosque is Lahore's earliest dated Mughal period mosque
The tomb of I'timād-ud-Daulah is often regarded as a draft of the Tāj Mahal.
The Tomb of Jahangir at Lahore does not have a dome as Jahangir forbade construction of a dome over his tomb.
Wazir Khan Mosque in Lahore, Pakistan, is considered to be the most ornately decorated Mughal-era mosque
The Shalimar Gardens, Lahore are among the most famous Mughal gardens.
The mosque's tile work exhibits Timurid influences introduced during Shah Jahan's campaigns in Central Asia.
The central chamber of the Shahi Hammam is decorated with frescoes
Badshahi Masjid, Lahore, Pakistan was the largest mosque in the world for 313 years, and is now the second-largest mosque in the Indian subcontinent.
Lalbagh Fort in Dhaka is an incomplete fort built by Prince Azam Shah
The 18th-century Sunehri Mosque is named for its gilded domes.
The Darwaza-i-Rauza (Great Gate) of the Taj Mahal.
Jali decorative work at the Tomb of Salim Chishti, Fatehpur Sikri.
Lahori Gate of the Red Fort, Delhi, India.
Jahangir's grave at the Tomb of Jahangir, decorated with parchin kari work.
Tomb of Nithar Begum at Khusro Bagh, Allahabad, India.
The shahada in Arabic calligraphy at the Wazir Khan Mosque, Lahore, Pakistan.
Akbar's Tomb at Agra, India uses red sandstone and white marble, like many of the Mughal monuments. The Taj Mahal is a notable exception, as it uses only marble.
Diwan-i-Khas (Hall of private audience) at Lahore Fort.
Shah Jahan Mosque in Thatta, Pakistan. The mosque is not built in the Mughal style, but reflects a heavy Persian influence.
One of the Tombs of Ustad-Shagird, Nakodar, India.

It also further incorporated and syncretized influences from wider Indian architecture, especially during the reign of Akbar (r.

India

India, officially the Republic of India (Hindi: ), – "Official name: Republic of India.";

India, officially the Republic of India (Hindi: ), – "Official name: Republic of India.";

An illustration from an early-modern manuscript of the Sanskrit epic Ramayana, composed in story-telling fashion c. undefined.
Cave 26 of the rock-cut Ajanta Caves
India has the majority of the world's wild tigers, approximately 3,000 in 2019.
A Chital (Axis axis) stag attempts to browse in the Nagarhole National Park in a region covered by a moderately dense forest.
The last three Asiatic cheetahs (on record) in India were shot dead in Surguja district, Madhya Pradesh, Central India by Maharajah Ramanuj Pratap Singh Deo. The young males, all from the same litter, were sitting together when they were shot at night in 1948.
Children awaiting school lunch in Rayka (also Raika), a village in rural Gujarat. The salutation Jai Bhim written on the blackboard honours the jurist, social reformer, and Dalit leader B. R. Ambedkar.
Indian cricketer Sachin Tendulkar about to score a record 14,000 runs in test cricket while playing against Australia in Bangalore, 2010.
Bhutesvara Yakshis, Buddhist reliefs from Mathura, {{CE|2nd century}}
Gupta terracotta relief, Krishna Killing the Horse Demon Keshi, 5th century
thumb|Elephanta Caves, triple-bust (trimurti) of Shiva, {{convert|18|ft|m}} tall, {{circa|550}}
Chola bronze of Shiva as Nataraja ("Lord of Dance"), Tamil Nadu, 10th or 11th century.
Jahangir Receives Prince Khurram at Ajmer on His Return from the Mewar Campaign, Balchand, {{circa|1635}}
Krishna Fluting to the Milkmaids, Kangra painting, 1775–1785

This renewal was reflected in a flowering of sculpture and architecture, which found patrons among an urban elite.

Panoramic view of mosque in the daylight

Humayun's Tomb

Tomb of the Mughal Emperor Humayun in Delhi, India.

Tomb of the Mughal Emperor Humayun in Delhi, India.

Panoramic view of mosque in the daylight
Mughal Emperor, Humayun r. 1508–1556
Capture of the last Mughal emperor Bahadur Shah Zafar and his sons by William Hodson at Humayun's tomb in September 1857
Floor plan of tomb structure of Humayun's Tomb
Humayun's cenotaph
Ceiling of entrance chamber inside
Humayun's Tomb Garden Enclosure Plan
Tomb of Barber(Nai Ka Gumbad)
Chillah Nizamuddin
Isa Khan Niyazi's Tomb, dating 1547
Bu Halima's Garden and tomb view
Nila Gumbad ca 1625–6, built by courtier Abdul Rahim Khan-I-Khana, for his servant Fahim Khan
Restoration work at Humayun's tomb, required removal of 3000 truckloads (12,000 cubic meters) of earth, and special chute installed at the back, from the roof (2008)
View of the Southwestern Corner of Humayun's Tomb
A reflection
Six-pointed Stars on One of Humayun's Tomb's Pishtaqs
Cenotaphs of Hamida Banu Begum, Dara Shikoh etc. in a side room
A jali mihrab indicates the qibla direction while one stands inside Humayun's cenotaph's chamber and looks to the west.
Humayun's Tomb Seen from Inside the West Gate
The Western Facade of the West Gate at Humayun's Tomb
Isa Khan's mosque, across his tomb, also built ca 1547 CE, near Humayun's tomb
Gateway into Araba Sarai, south to the pathway towards Humayun's tomb
Afsarwala tomb located near Humayun Tomb
Tomb of Humayun, with his barber's tomb (Nai-ka-Gumbad) in the foreground, Delhi (1858 photograph)
English garden-style roundabouts replaced the square central tanks of the Charbagh garden in 1860
Humayun's Tomb at night
A side view of Humayun's Tomb

The building was the first to use its unique combination of red sandstone and white marble, and includes several elements of Indian architecture, like the small canopies or chhatris surrounding the central dome, popular in Rajasthani architecture and which were originally covered with blue tiles.

Memorial chhatri of Jat Rana Udaybhanu Singh Maharaj at Dholpur, Rajasthan, India.

Chhatri

Memorial chhatri of Jat Rana Udaybhanu Singh Maharaj at Dholpur, Rajasthan, India.
Chhatri set atop each corner of the Hall of Audience in Fatehpur Sikri palace complex.
Chhatri of Vithoji in Maheshwar.
Rao Lakhaji Chhatri Bhuj
Chhatri of Ram Mohan Roy in Arnos Vale Cemetery, Bristol, England
A 12th-century chatri, Jaisalmir
Bada Bagh at Jaisalmer
Chhatri at Rajgarh, Rajasthan
Moosi Rani Ki Chhatri, Alwar
Barah Khamba Chhatri at Jalsen Talab in Hindaun

Chhatri are elevated, dome-shaped pavilions used as an element in Indo-Islamic architecture and Indian architecture.

Architecture of a Hindu temple (Nagara style). These core elements are evidenced in the oldest surviving 5th–6th century CE temples.

Hindu temple architecture

Inner sanctum, the garbha griha or womb-chamber, where the primary Murti or the image of a deity is housed in a simple bare cell.

Inner sanctum, the garbha griha or womb-chamber, where the primary Murti or the image of a deity is housed in a simple bare cell.

Architecture of a Hindu temple (Nagara style). These core elements are evidenced in the oldest surviving 5th–6th century CE temples.
The Meenakshi temple complex of Madurai, mostly built between 1623 and 1655 CE, a large complex in the Dravidian architecture of South India, dominated by gopuram gatehouse towers. The two main shrines are much smaller, with gold tops.
A Badami Shiva temple in Karnataka.
Kailasanatha temple, remarkably carved out of one single rock was built by Rashtrakuta king Krishna I (r. 756–773 CE)
17th-century palm leaf manuscript page on temple building, Odisha.
The 8×8 (64) grid Manduka Hindu Temple Floor Plan, according to Vastupurusamandala. The 64 grid is the most sacred and common Hindu temple template. The bright saffron centre, where diagonals intersect above, represents the Purusha of Hindu philosophy.
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Dashavatara temple sculpture at Deogarh, completed about 500 CE.
Architecture of the Khajuraho temples
Dravidian (South Indian) Hindu Temple Architecture
Navlakha Temple, Ghumli, Gujarat, 12th century
Devotions in the Swaminarayan temple in Houston, Texas (2004)
The profile of the 13th-century Po Klong Garai Temple near Phan Rang includes all the buildings typical of a Cham temple. From left to right one can see the gopura, the saddle-shaped kosagrha, and mandapa attached to the kalan tower.
Nashik Maharashtra temple, cross section and plan (1910 sketch)
Vrindavan Uttar Pradesh temple plan
Khajuraho Madhya Pradesh temple plan
Puri Odisha temple complex plan
Bhubneshwar Odisha, a smaller temple plan
Halebidu Karnataka temple plan
Chidambaram Tamil Nadu temple plan
Thiruvallur, Tamil Hindu temple complex
Mandapa of a temple in South India. Much temple sculpture was originally painted.
Stepped floorplan of Dattatreya Temple (one side of the shrine) with five projections at Chattarki in Gulbarga district, 12th century CE
Shrine wall and superstructure in Kasivisvesvara temple at Lakkundi
Ornate Gadag style pillars at Sarasvati Temple, Trikuteshwara temple complex at Gadag
Mahadeva Temple at Itagi, Koppal district in Karnataka, also called Devalaya Chakravarti,<ref name="deva">Cousens (1926), p. 101</ref><ref name="fine">Kamath (2001), pp. 117–118</ref> 1112 CE, an example of dravida articulation with a nagara superstructure.
Single storey gopura (Dravidian architecture)
Two storey gopura (Dravidian architecture)
Pillar elements (shared by Nagara and Dravidian)
Athisthana architectural elements of a Hindu temple
Entablature elements
A vimana with mandapam elements (Dravidian architecture)

In Aihole, known as the "Cradle of Indian architecture," there are over 150 temples scattered around the village.

Islam in India

India's second-largest religion, with 14.2% of the country's population, approximately 172.2 million people identifying as adherents of Islam in 2011 Census.

India's second-largest religion, with 14.2% of the country's population, approximately 172.2 million people identifying as adherents of Islam in 2011 Census.

Names, routes and locations of the Periplus of the Erythraean Sea (1st century CE)
Cheraman Perumal Juma Masjid on the Malabar Coast, probably the first Mosque in India.
The Taj Mahal in Agra, India. It was built under Mughal emperor Shah Jahan in the 17th century, and represents Indo-Islamic architecture.
Muslim woman clad in fine Bengali muslin, in 18th-century Dhaka, Bengal Subah.
Maulana Azad was a prominent leader of the Indian independence movement and a strong advocate of Hindu-Muslim unity. Shown here is Azad (left) with Sardar Patel and Mahatma Gandhi in 1940.
The Partition of British India was based on religion. The negotiations failed several times, with differing demands about boundaries, as shown in this map of 1946.
Khan Abdul Ghaffar Khan with Gandhi in 1930. Also known as Frontier Gandhi, Khan led the non-violent opposition against the British Raj and strongly opposed the partition of India.
A train of Muslim refugees in India leaving for Pakistan
Mausoleum of 1 st Wali–ul–Hind:Moulai Abadullah, Khambat, Gujarat, era 1050–1100 CE.
Dawoodi Bohra 53rd Dai Syedna Mufaddal Saifuddin, with Dawat office at Mumbai.
Tomb of Sufi saint Shaikh Salim Chisti in Fatehpur Sikri, Uttar Pradesh
Mirza Ghulam Ahmad, founder of the Ahmadiyya movement
An outside view of the Maqbara.
Aligarh Muslim University
[[All India Ulema and Mashaikh Board|AIUMB
]] protest against caricature of Prophet of Islam in the city of Sambhal, Uttar Pradesh, India.
Char Minar at Old City in Hyderabad.
Ruins of the Surya Temple at Martand, which was destroyed due to the iconoclastic policies of Sikandar Butshikan, photo taken by John Burke in 1868.
Muslim homes and businesses burned during the 2020 Delhi riots.
The skyline of Ahmedabad filled with smoke as buildings and shops are set on fire by rioting mobs. The riots, which took place following the Godhra train burning incident, killed more than 790 Muslims and 254 Hindus, including those killed in the Godhra train fire. These figures were reported to the Rajya Sabha by the Union Minister of State for Home Affairs Sriprakash Jaiswal in May 2005.
The Jamalabad fort route. Mangalorean Catholics had travelled through this route on their way to Srirangapatna.
Azim Premji, CEO of India's 3rd largest IT company Wipro Technologies and the 5th richest man in India with an estimated fortune of US$17.1 billion
The Taj Mahal in Agra is one of India's most iconic monuments.
A rebuilt structure of the old Cheraman Juma Mosque, Kerala, which is often considered as the first Masjid of India
Asafi Imambargah, also known as Bara Imambara at Lucknow
The Humayun's Tomb in Delhi
Gol Gumbaz at Bijapur, Karnataka, has the second largest pre-modern dome in the world after the Byzantine Hagia Sophia.
Bahauddin Makbara, mausoleum of the Wazir of Junagadh, Gujarat
400-year-old Makkah Masjid, Hyderabad. (Photo: 1885)
The Asafi Mosque within the Asafi Imambargah Complex at Lucknow
The Rumi Darwaza at Lucknow
Gole-Gumma, Mousoleum of Nawab Wahab Khan, Kurnool, Andhra Pradesh
Charminar, the most famous of the monuments of Hyderabad
Red Fort, Delhi
Jama Masjid, Delhi, one of the largest mosques in India

Architecture of India took new shape with the advent of Islamic rule in India towards the end of the 12th century CE.

The British-era Islamia College was built in an Indo-Saracenic Revival architectural style in Peshawar, Pakistan.

Indo-Saracenic architecture

Revivalist architectural style mostly used by British architects in India in the later 19th century, especially in public and government buildings in the British Raj, and the palaces of rulers of the princely states.

Revivalist architectural style mostly used by British architects in India in the later 19th century, especially in public and government buildings in the British Raj, and the palaces of rulers of the princely states.

The British-era Islamia College was built in an Indo-Saracenic Revival architectural style in Peshawar, Pakistan.
The Rambagh Palace in Jaipur reflecting Imperial Rajasthani architecture. Early 20th-century.
Aitchison College in Lahore with domed chhatris, jalis, chhajja below the balcony, and other features, reflective of Rajasthani architecture.
Vidhana Soudha, Bangalore incorporates elements of Indo-Saracenic and Dravidian styles. Constructed 1951–1956.
Sultan Abdul Samad Building in Kuala Lumpur
Kuala Lumpur Railway Station, by Arthur Benison Hubback, 1910.
General Post Office (GPO), Kolkata
Ujjayanta Palace, Agartala
Esplanade Mansion, Kolkata
Building on B.B.D. Bagh, Kolkata
Metropolitan Building Façade, Kolkata
Albert Hall Museum, Jaipur
Jenkins School, Cooch Behar
Cooch Behar Palace, West Bengal
Ubudiah Mosque (Hubback, 1913), Kuala Kangsar, Perak
Jubilee Clock Tower in George Town, Penang
National Textile Museum in Kuala Lumpur, by Hubback, 1905. Originally as offices for the Federated Malay States Railways.
The Old High Court Building in Kuala Lumpur
Old Kuala Lumpur Town Hall, Hubback, 1896-1904
Jamek Mosque in Kuala Lumpur, by Hubback
Railway Administration Building, Kuala Lumpur
Kellie's Castle, Batu Gajah, Perak
The Gateway of India
The Taj Mahal Hotel in Mumbai
Southern Railway Headquarters, Chennai
Mysore Palace
The National Art Gallery (Chennai)
Victoria Public Hall in Chennai
Senate House (University of Madras)
Mumbai GPO, reminiscent of the Gol Gumbaz
Khalsa College, Amritsar
Daly College, Indore
Chepauk Palace, Chennai
Kachiguda Railway Station, Hyderabad
Lucknow Charbagh Railway Station
Raj Bhavan (backview), Kolkata
Howrah Railway Station
Ahsan Manzil in Dhaka
Curzon Hall in Dhaka
Tajhat Palace in Rangpur
Natore Rajbari
Rose Garden Palace
Uttara Gonobhaban
Murapara Rajbari
Puthia Rajbari
Bangladesh Folk Arts and Crafts Foundation
Chittagong Court Building
Lahore Museum, Lahore
Karachi Metropolitan Corporation Building, Karachi, 1927-30
University of the Punjab, Lahore
Sadiq Dane High School, Bahawalpur
Patiala Block of King Edward Medical University, Lahore
Karachi Chamber of Commerce Building
Darbar Mahal, Bahawalpur
Multan Clock Tower, Multan
National Academy of Performing Arts, Karachi
Sezincote House, Gloucestershire, 1805
Royal Pavilion in Brighton, 1815–23
Western Pavilion in Brighton, 1828, designed by Amon Henry Wilds as his own home
Elephant Tea Rooms, Sunderland, 1877
Sassoon Mausoleum, now a chic Brighton supper club, 1892
Jami Ul-Alfar Mosque in Colombo
Jaffna Public Library in Jaffna
Jaffna Clock Tower in Jaffna
Original Honkan, Tokyo National Museum, by Josiah Conder, largely destroyed by an earthquake in 1923
Palais du Bardo, parc Montsouris, Paris

By doing this they kept Indian architecture while adding elements of British and European architecture; this, coupled with the British allowing some regional Indian princes to stay in power under agreements, made their presence more "palatable" for the Indians.

Sanchi

Buddhist complex, famous for its Great Stupa, on a hilltop at Sanchi Town in Raisen District of the State of Madhya Pradesh, India.

Buddhist complex, famous for its Great Stupa, on a hilltop at Sanchi Town in Raisen District of the State of Madhya Pradesh, India.

Plan of the monuments of the hill of Sanchi, numbered 1 to 50.
The Ashoka pillar at Sanchi.
The capital of the Sanchi pillar of Ashoka, as discovered (left), and simulation of original appearance (right). It is very similar to the Lion Capital of Ashoka at Sarnath, except for the abacus, here adorned with flame palmettes and facing geese, 250 BCE. Sanchi Archaeological Museum.
by later illustrations among the Sanchi reliefs
The Great Stupa under the Sungas. The Sungas nearly doubled the diameter of the initial stupa, encasing it in stone, and built a balustrade and a railing around it.
Foreigner on a horse, circa 115 BCE, Stupa No2.
Sunga period railings were initially blank (left: Great Stupa), and only started to be decorated circa 115 BCE with Stupa No.2 (right).
Sunga pillar No25 with own capital on the side.
Siri-Satakani inscription
Cave No.19
The Worship of the Bodhisattva's hair
Vedisakehi damtakārehi rupakammam katam
The Great Stupa at the time of the Satavahanas.
Temptation of the Buddha, with the Buddha on the left (symbolized by his throne only) surrounded by rejoicing devotees, Mara and his daughters (center), and the demons of Mara fleeing (right).
War over the Buddha's Relics, kept by the city of Kushinagar, South Gate, Stupa no.1, Sanchi.
King Ashoka visits Ramagrama, to take relics of the Buddha from the Nagas, but he failed, the Nagas being too powerful. Southern gateway, Stupa 1, Southern Gateway, Sanchi.
Ashoka in grief, supported by his two queens, in a relief at Sanchi. Stupa 1, Southern gateway. The identification with Ashoka is confirm by a similar relief from Kanaganahalli inscribed "Raya Asoko".
Bodhi tree temple depicted in Sanchi, Stupa 1, Southern gateway.
Temple for the Bodhi Tree (Eastern Gateway).
foreigners illustrated at Sanchi worshiping the Great Stupa
Foreigners worshiping Stupa
Greek travelling costume
Another one
Miracle at Kapilavastu
Miracle of the Buddha walking on the river Nairanjana
Procession of king Suddhodana from Kapilavastu
"The promenade of the Buddha", or Chankrama, used to depict the Buddha in motion in Buddhist aniconism.
Bimbisara with his royal cortege issuing from the city of Rajagriha to visit the Buddha
Foreigners making a dedication at the Southern Gateway of Stupa No 1
Stupas and monasteries at Sanchi in the early centuries of the current era. Reconstruction, 1900
Sanchi inscription of Chandragupta II.
Temple 17: a Gupta period tetrastyle prostyle temple of Classical appearance. 5th century CE
Statue of Padmapani (5th c.or 9th c.) Victoria and Albert Museum.
Pillar 26: one of the two four-lions stambha capitals at Sanchi, with lions, central flame palmette and Wheel of Law (axis, stubs of the spokes and part of the circumference only), initially located at the Northern Gateway of the Great Stupa. Sanchi Archaeological Museum.
Pillar 26: lion pillar capital at time of discovery, with Dharmachakra wheel (reconstitution). Northern Gateway.
this image
Pillar 35 column stump (right), and bell capital with abacus, positioned upside down.
Vajrapani statue of pillar 35, 5th c. CE. Sanchi Archaeological Museum.
Temple 18 at Sanchi, an apsidal hall with Maurya foundations, rebuilt at the time of Harsha (7th century CE).
Temple 45
The Great Stupa as breached by Sir Herbert Maddock in 1822. Watercolor by Frederick Charles Maisey, in 1851.
Ruins of the Southern Gateway, Sanchi in 1875.
A Gate to the Stupa of Sanchi 1932
Chetiyagiri Vihara
Inscribed panel from Sanchi in Brahmi script in the British Museum
The last two letters to the right of this inscription in Brahmi form the word "dǎnam" (donation). This hypothesis permitted the decipherment of the Brahmi script by James Prinsep in 1837.
General view of the Stupas at Sanchi by F.C. Maisey, 1851 (The Great Stupa on top of the hill, and Stupa 2 at the forefront)
The Great Stupa (Stupa No.1), started in the 3rd century BCE
Stupa No.2
Stupa No.3
Buddhist Temple, No.17
Remains of the Ashokan Pillar in polished stone (right of the Southern Gateway), with its Edict.
Sanchi Minor Pillar Edict of Ashoka, in-situ (detail of the previous image).
Remains of the shaft of the pillar of Ashoka, under a shed near the Southern Gateway.
Side view of the capital. Sanchi Archaeological Museum.<ref name="p.25-28 Ashoka pillar"/>
Shunga balustrade and staircase.
Shunga stonework.
Shunga vedika (railing) with inscriptions.
Deambulatory pathway.
Summit railing and umbrellas.
Flame palmette.
Flame palmette and lotus.
Peacock.
Woman riding a Centaur.
Lotus.
Half lotus.
Lion.
Elephant.
Elephant with branch.
Floral motif.
Lakshmi with lotus and two child attendants, probably derived from [[:File:Venus with two cupids 2.jpg|similar images of Venus]]<ref>An Indian Statuette From Pompeii, Mirella Levi D'Ancona, in Artibus Asiae, Vol. 13, No. 3 (1950) p. 171</ref>
Griffin with Brahmi script inscription.
Female riding a Centaur.
Lotus within beads and reels motif.
Stairway and railing.
Lotus medallions.
Floral designs.
Post relief.<ref>Marshall p. 82</ref>
Relics of Sariputra and Mahamoggallana.
Detail of the foreigners, in Greek dress and playing carnyxes and aolus flute. Northern Gateway of Stupa I (detail).
Foreigners holding grapes and riding winged lions, Sanchi Stupa 1, Eastern Gateway.<ref>"The Diffusion of Classical Art in Antiquity, John Boardman, 1993, p. 112 Note 91</ref>
Foreigners riding horses.
Foreign heroe fighting a Makara
Foreigners on horses, wearing headbands, caps and boots. Western gate of Stupa 1.
Hero with headband wrestling a Makara.
Indians riding horses.
Indians riding bulls.
Indians riding bulls.
Queen Maya lustrated by Elephants.
The Buddha represented by the Dharmacakra.
Bodhi Tree.
Winged lion.
Winged lions.
The Buddha represented by the Dharmacakra.
Men and Women on Elephants.
Men and Women on Elephants.
Stupa representing a Buddha.
Lakshmi lustrated by Elephants.
Men on lions.
Men on lions.
2nd panel
3rd panel
Second panel
Bottom panel Dvarapala guardian deity or devotee.
Second panel
Possibly demons, or the attack of Mara.
Second panel
Bottom panel Dvarapala guardian deity or devotee.
2nd panel
3rd panel
A Seated Buddha statue (Gupta temple).
Buddha Statue (Great Stupa).
Seated Buddha (Great Stupa).
Pillar 34 with lion.<ref>Marshall p. 52 Pillar 34</ref>
The winged lion capital of pillar 34 (lost).
Great Stupa, Eastern Gateway, in 1875.
West Gateway in 1882.
South Gateway in 1882.
Great Stupa, Northern Gateway in 1861.
Temple 18 in 1861.
A vision of ancient Indian court life, using motifs from Sanchi (wood engraving, 1878).

The Great Stupa at Sanchi is one of the oldest stone structures in India, and an important monument of Indian Architecture.

The Mosque of the Prophet, standing on the site of Muhammad's first mosque in Medina. The present-day building is the result of many reconstructions and expansions up to modern times.

Islamic architecture

Islamic architecture comprises the architectural styles of buildings associated with Islam.

Islamic architecture comprises the architectural styles of buildings associated with Islam.

The Mosque of the Prophet, standing on the site of Muhammad's first mosque in Medina. The present-day building is the result of many reconstructions and expansions up to modern times.
Section of the Umayyad-era Mshatta Facade, now in the Pergamon Museum in Berlin, from a palace near Amman
The walls and minaret of the Great Mosque of Samarra built by the Abbasids in the 9th century
The mihrab and maqsura area of the Great Mosque of Cordoba, added to the mosque by al-Hakam II in the late 10th century
Bab al-Futuh gate built by the Fatimid vazir Badr al-Jamali
Shalamar Gardens, a Mughal paradise garden in Lahore, Pakistan
The sahn (courtyard) and minaret of the Great Mosque of Kairouan, Tunisia
Qusair 'Amra
An iwan in the Jameh Mosque of Isfahan
Ribbed dome in the Mosque–Cathedral of Córdoba, dating from the 10th century
Sultan Ahmed Mosque
Mosque in Qasr al-Hallabat
Entrance courtyard of Qasr al-Hallabat
The Dome of the Rock in Jerusalem (late 7th century)
Tarikhaneh Temple, a pre-Islamic monument built in Sasanian Persia which was later turned into a mosque, showing elements of Iranian architecture before the spread of Islam
The Registan is the ensemble of three madrasas, in Samarkand, modern day Uzbekistan
Shah Mosque in Naqsh-e Jahan Square, Isfahan, Iran
The Bibi-Heybat Mosque in Baku, Azerbaijan
Portal of the Great Mosque of Divriği (1228–1229)
The Bāb al-Yaman (بَـاب ٱلْـيَـمَـن, Gate of the Yemen) in the Old City of Sana'a, Yemen
Demak Mosque One of the oldest surviving mosques in Indonesia.
The Great Mosque of Xi'an, China
A Tatar minaret dating from the 15th century
Almnara Tower Somalia
The 13th century Fakr ad-Din Mosque in Mogadishu
Sultan Qaboos Grand Mosque at Muscat is the main mosque in the Sultanate of Oman, started in 1995 and inaugurated in 2001.
Faisal Mosque at Islamabad, Pakistan designed by Vedat Dalokay.
Museum of Islamic Art at Doha, Qatar designed by I. M. Pei.
Islamic geometric patterns in Saint Petersburg, Russia
Dome with squinches in the Palace of Ardashir of pre-Islamic Persia. squinches are one of the most significant Sasanian contribution to Islamic architecture<ref>{{cite web|last1=Huff|first1=D.|title=ARCHITECTURE iii. Sasanian Period – Encyclopaedia Iranica|url=http://www.iranicaonline.org/articles/architecture-iii|access-date=16 March 2019|website=www.iranicaonline.org|publisher=Encyclopaedia Iranica}}</ref>
The dome of the Gur-i Amir Mausoleum in Samarqand
Non-radial rib vault in the Jameh Mosque of Isfahan
Dome of the tomb of Ahmed Sanjar in Merv
Upper dome of Ālī Qāpū, Isfahan
VIew of the main dome at Humayun's Tomb in Delhi
Dome of Taj Mahal in Agra
The bulbous domes of the Badshahi Mosque in Lahore
The main dome of Shah Jahan Mosque, Thatta has tiles arranged in a stellate pattern to represent the night sky
The interior of the main dome of Shahi Hammam in Lahore
Schematic drawing of a pendentive dome
Central domes of the Hagia Sophia
Dome of the Kalenderhane Mosque
Selimiye Mosque, Edirne
Mashrabiya balcony in Bayt al-Suhaymi, Cairo (Egypt)
Hünkâr Mahfili (prayer space for the sultan) inside the Hagia Sophia (Turkey)
Use of Jali screen at Lahore Fort (Pakistan)
Jharokha balcony at Mehrangarh Fort in Jodhpur (India)
Design of a muqarnas quarter vault from the Topkapı Scroll
Muqarnas in the necropolis of Shah-i-Zinda, Samarqand
Muqarnas in the Alhambra
The muqarna of a mosque in Bukhara, Uzbekistan
Intricate design on the muqarna of Wazir Khan Mosque in Lahore
Geometrical tile decoration (Zellij) in the Ben Youssef Madrasa in Marrakesh
Dome of the Shah Mosque in Isfahan with calligraphic inscription
Bengali Islamic terracotta on a 17th-century mosque in Tangail, Bangladesh
Tiles in Topkapı Palace, an example of Ottoman Architecture
Much of the interior of Emperor Jahangir's mausoleum in Lahore is adorned with Mughal-era frescoes.
Calligraphic inscription on the dome of the Mevlana mausoleum
Design of Ceiling in the Mahabat Khan Mosque in Peshawar
Mihrab of the Great Mosque of Cordoba (10th century)
Stucco-carved mihrab of Uljaytu at the Jameh Mosque of Isfahan (early 14th century)
Mihrab of the Mosque-Madrasa of Sultan Hasan in Cairo (14th century)
Ottoman mihrab with Iznik tiles in the Rüstem Pasha Mosque, Istanbul (16th century)
Mihrab of the Jama Masjid in Delhi (mid-17th century)
Minaret of the Great Mosque of Kairouan (early 9th century)
Minaret of Jam, Afghanistan (12th century)
Minaret of Sultan Qaytbay (15th century) at the Al-Azhar Mosque in Cairo
Ottoman minarets of the Sultan Ahmed Mosque in Istanbul (early 17th century)
Qutb Minar of Delhi (12th century)
Medina quarter of Fez, Morocco
Figure-ground diagram of Algiers
Figure-ground diagram of a European town (1819)
Kharraqan Towers, mausoleums of Seljuk princes, built in 1068 and 1093 in Iran
Dome in the Friday Mosque of Isfahan, Iran, added in 1088–89 by Seljuk vizier Taj al-Mulk
Ghaznavid Tower of Mas'ud III near Ghazni (present-day Afghanistan), from the early 12th century
Ribat-i Sharaf caravanserai in Khorasan (northeastern Iran), built in 1114–1115
The Kalyan Minaret in Bukhara (present-day Uzbekistan), built in 1127 as part of a Qarakhanid congregational mosque
Toghrol Tower in Rayy, south of present-day Tehran (Iran), built in 1139 as the tomb of the Seljuk sultan Tughril
Mausoleum of Sultan Ahmad Sanjar (c. 1152) in Merv (present-day Turkmenistan)
Hospital of Nur al-Din, Damascus (1154)
Qarakhanid Mausoleums in Uzgen (Kyrgyzstan), second half of the 12th century
Minaret of the al-Nuri Mosque in Mosul (before its destruction in 2017), dating from the 12th century
Courtyard façade of the Great Mosque of Diyarbakir, founded in the 7th century and rebuilt by the Artuqids in the 12th century
Yedi Kardeş Tower in the city walls of Diyarbakir, built by Artuqid sultan Nasir al-Din Mahmud in 1208–1209
Mausoleum of Fakhr al-Din Razi or Il-Arslan in Kunya-Urgench (Turkmenistan), late 12th or early 13th century (Khwarazmian Empire period)
Zinciriye or Sultan Isa Madrasa in Mardin (1385)
Hypostyle interior of the Alâeddin Mosque in Konya (12th-13th centuries)
Seljuk mosaic tile decoration from the Kubadabad Palace (early 13th-century Anatolia)
Courtyard of the Sultan Han caravanserai, built in 1229 on the road between Aksaray and Konya
Interior of the Çifte Minareli Medrese in Erzurum (c. 1250)
Entrance portal of the Karatay Madrasa in Konya (c. 1251), with muqarnas and ablaq decoration
Tile decoration inside the Karatay Madrasa in Konya (c. 1251)
Stone-carved decoration in the entrance portal of the Ince Minareli Medrese in Konya (c. 1265)
Entrance and minarets of the Gök Medrese in Sivas (1271–2)
Döner Kümbet in Kayseri (1276), the tomb of a Seljuk princess
Eşrefoğlu Mosque in Beyşehir (1297), an example of a wooden hypostyle mosque
The Green Mosque in Iznik (late 14th century)<ref>{{Cite book|last=Goodwin|first=Godfrey|title=A History of Ottoman Architecture|publisher=Thames & Hudson|year=1971|isbn=0500274290|location=New York|pages=20}}</ref>
The Grand Mosque of Bursa (end of 14th century)
Tiled mihrab of the Green Mosque in Bursa (early 15th century)
Courtyard of the Bayezid II Mosque, Istanbul (late 15th century)
Süleymaniye Mosque, Istanbul (16th century), designed by Mimar Sinan
One of the chambers of the Topkapı Palace
Interior of Sultan Ahmed Mosque, Istanbul (early 17th century)
Nuruosmaniye Mosque, Istanbul (mid-18th century), an example of the Ottoman Baroque style
The sebil of Abdülhamid I, Istanbul (late 18th century)<ref>{{Cite book|last=Goodwin|first=Godfrey|title=A History of Ottoman Architecture|publisher=Thames & Hudson|year=1971|isbn=0500274290|location=New York}}</ref>
Entrance gates of the Dolmabahçe Palace, Istanbul (19th century)
Istanbul High School (19th century)
Examples of civil Ottoman architecture in Eskişehir
Yalı is a house or mansion constructed along the shores of the Bosphorus near Istanbul
Reception Hall of Abd ar-Rahman III at Madinat al-Zahra (10th century, caliphal period)
Aljaferia Palace in Zaragoza (11th century, Taifa period)
Almoravid Qubba in Marrakesh (early 12th century, Almoravid period)
Kutubiyya Mosque in Marrakesh (12th century, Almohad period)
Giralda tower in Seville: former Almohad minaret (12th century) converted into a Christian bell tower
Kasbah Mosque in Tunis (13th century, Hafsid period)
Bou Inania Madrasa in Fes (14th century, Marinid period)
The Court of the Lions at the Alhambra, Granada (14th century, Nasrid period)
Dome of the Hall of Ambassadors in the Alcazar of Seville (14th century): an example of Mudejar architecture
Youssef Dey Mosque in Tunis (17th century): an example of Ottoman influence blended with local styles
Central mosque of Ghardaïa: an example of local architecture in the M'zab region (Algeria)
Mihrab of the Mausoleum of Sultan Baybars in Damascus (built 1277-1281)
Complex of Sultan Qalawun in Cairo (built in 1284–85). It included a mausoleum, a madrasa, and a highly important maristan (hospital).<ref>{{Cite book|last=Raymond|first=André|title=Le Caire|publisher=Fayard|year=1993|isbn=9782213029832}}</ref>
Mosque of al-Nasir Muhammad (built in 1318 and modified in 1335) at the Citadel of Cairo
The Madrasa-Mosque of Sultan Hasan (built between 1356 and 1361), the largest and one of the most impressive Mamluk monuments{{sfn|Blair|Bloom|1995|p=82}}{{sfn|Williams|2018|p=78}}
Projecting entrance portal of the Madrasa-Mosque of Sultan Barquq (built between 1384 and 1386)
Interior of a mausoleum in the Khanqah-Mosque of Faraj ibn Barquq (built between 1400 and 1411)
Twin minarets of Bab Zuweila, built between 1415 and 1420 for the nearby Mosque of al-Mu'ayyad Shaykh
Carved stone dome of the Funerary complex of Sultan Qaytbay (completed in 1474) in the Northern Cemetery of Cairo
Sabil of Qaytbay (1482) at the Haram al-Sharif, Jerusalem
Wikala of Sultan al-Ghuri (1505), example of an urban caravanserai in Cairo
Sabil-Kuttab of Abd ar-Rahman Katkhuda (1744), which combines Mamluk and Ottoman elements{{sfn|Williams|2018|p=230}}
Abu al-Abbas al-Mursi Mosque in Alexandria, built in the 1940s in a neo-Mamluk style
The Taj Mahal, the most famous building of Mughal architecture.
Humayun's Tomb, Delhi, the first fully developed Mughal imperial tomb, 1569-70 CE
Tomb of Shah Rukn-e-Alam in Multan, Pakistan
Badshahi Mosque in Lahore, Pakistan
Bibi Ka Maqbara at Aurangabad
Baradri (a type of Mughal building) at Fatima Jinnah Park in Islamabad
Gol Gumbaz built by the Bijapur Sultanate in Deccani style
Shah Jahan Mosque in Thatta, Pakistan
Sixty Dome Mosque in Bangladesh
Gate of Panembahan Senapati Mosque in Kotagede, Yogyakarta.
The Grand Mosque of the Masjid Agung in Central Java, Indonesia, features a multi-layered roof typical of Indonesian mosque architecture.
Baiturrahman Grand Mosque, Indonesia, with Mughal and Dutch Colonial influences.
The Menara Kudus Mosque employs a Hindu-Buddhist temple-like structure as a minaret<ref name="Schoppert, P. 1997, p. 207">Schoppert, P., Damais, S., Java Style, 1997, Didier Millet, Paris, p. 207, {{ISBN|962-593-232-1}}</ref>
Masjid Kampung Laut
Masjid Zahir
Kampung Hulu Mosque
Sultan Alaeddin Royal Mosque
Paloh Mosque
The Mosque of Arwa bint Ahmad in Jibla (11th century), an example of a hypostyle courtyard mosque
Great Mosque of Zabid, with one of the oldest surviving minarets in Yemen (circa 13th century)
Central dome of the Ashrafiyya Mosque in Ta'izz (circa 1397)
Shibam, an example of a historic fortified village
Minaret at the Jama Masjid in Delhi (mid-17th century)
alt=|The Qutb Minar and Quwwat al-Islam Mosque complex in Delhi, begun in the 1190s and expanded in the 13th to 14th centuries{{Sfn|Bloom|Blair|2009|loc=Architecture}}
The Friday Mosque of Ahmedabad (1423), which prominently combines Islamic and indigenous Indian architectural forms{{Sfn|Bloom|Blair|2009|loc=Architecture; VI. c. 1250–c. 1500; A. Eastern Islamic lands; 3. India}}
alt=|Fatehpur Sikri, a palatial complex begun in the 1560s by Akbar{{Sfn|Bloom|Blair|2009|loc=Fatehpur Sikri}}
Charminar in Hyderabad (1591), an example of architecture in the Deccan Sultanates{{Sfn|Bloom|Blair|2009|loc=Hyderabad}}
Room with fountain in the Muthamman Burj (1628–30), added by Shah Jahan inside the Agra Fort built by Akbar{{Sfn|Bloom|Blair|2009|loc=Agra}}
The Red Fort in Delhi, built between 1639 and 1648 as the citadel of Shah Jahan's new capital{{Sfn|Bloom|Blair|2009|loc=Delhi}}
Wazir Khan Mosque in Lahore (1635), notable for its tile-decorated surfaces{{sfn|Porter|Degeorge|2009|p=250}}
alt=|Badshahi Mosque in Lahore ({{circa|1673}}–1674){{sfn|Bloom|Blair|2009|loc=Architecture; VII. c. 1500–c. 1900; D. India}}
alt=|Bibi Ka Maqbara at Aurangabad (1678){{sfn|Porter|Degeorge|2009|p=277}}
The Asfi Mosque of the Bara Imambara complex in Lucknow ({{circa|1780}}){{sfn|Porter|Degeorge|2009|p=285}}

Further east, it was also influenced by Chinese and Indian architecture as Islam spread to Southeast Asia.