Arctic hare

ArcticharesLepus arcticus
The Arctic hare (Lepus arcticus) is a species of hare which is highly adapted to living in the Arctic tundra, and other icy biomes.wikipedia
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Hare

jackrabbitLepushares
The Arctic hare (Lepus arcticus) is a species of hare which is highly adapted to living in the Arctic tundra, and other icy biomes.

Tundra

tundra climateArctic tundraET
The Arctic hare is well adapted to conditions found in the tundras, plateaus and treeless coasts of this region, including cold weather and frozen precipitation.
Notable animals in the Arctic tundra include reindeer (caribou), musk ox, Arctic hare, Arctic fox, snowy owl, lemmings, and even polar bears near the ocean.

Greenland

Kalaallit NunaatGreenlandicGL
The Arctic hare is distributed over the northernmost regions of Greenland, the Canadian Arctic islands and Northern Canada, including Ellesmere Island, and farther south in Labrador and Newfoundland.
The few native land mammals in Greenland include the polar bear, reindeer (introduced by Europeans), arctic fox, arctic hare, musk ox, collared lemming, ermine, and arctic wolf.

Camouflage

cryptic colorationcamouflagedcamouflaging
In Newfoundland and southern Labrador, the Arctic hare changes its coat color, moulting and growing new fur, from brown or grey in the summer to white in the winter, like some other Arctic animals including ermine and ptarmigan, enabling it to remain camouflaged as the environment changes.
On a longer timescale, animals like the Arctic hare, Arctic fox, stoat, and rock ptarmigan have snow camouflage, changing their coat colour (by moulting and growing new fur or feathers) from brown or grey in the summer to white in the winter; the Arctic fox is the only species in the dog family to do so.

Wolf

wolvesgray wolfgrey wolf
Known predators of the Arctic hare are the Arctic fox (Vulpes lagopus), Red fox (Vulpes vulpes), Wolf (Canis lupus), Mountain lion (Puma concolor), Lynx (Lynx canadensis), Ermine (Mustela erminea), Snowy owl (Bubo scandiacus), Gyrfalcon (Falco rusticolus), Rough-legged hawk (Buteo lagopus) – and occasionally humans.
One wolf chased a caribou for 8 km, another chased and tracked a deer for 20 km, and one 11-year-old wolf chased and caught an arctic hare after 7 minutes.

John Ross (Royal Navy officer)

John RossSir John RossJohn Ross (Arctic explorer)
Arctic explorer John Ross described the Arctic hare in 1819.

Lagomorpha

lagomorphlagomorphsDuplicidentata
The Arctic hare is one of the largest living lagomorphs.

Arctic Archipelago

Canadian Arctic ArchipelagoCanadian arctic islandsArctic Islands
The Arctic hare is distributed over the northernmost regions of Greenland, the Canadian Arctic islands and Northern Canada, including Ellesmere Island, and farther south in Labrador and Newfoundland.

Northern Canada

Canadian Arcticnorthern CanadianArctic Canada
The Arctic hare is distributed over the northernmost regions of Greenland, the Canadian Arctic islands and Northern Canada, including Ellesmere Island, and farther south in Labrador and Newfoundland.

Ellesmere Island

EllesmereEllesmere LandEllsemere Island
The Arctic hare is distributed over the northernmost regions of Greenland, the Canadian Arctic islands and Northern Canada, including Ellesmere Island, and farther south in Labrador and Newfoundland.

Labrador

Labrador, CanadaCoast of LabradorLAB
The Arctic hare is distributed over the northernmost regions of Greenland, the Canadian Arctic islands and Northern Canada, including Ellesmere Island, and farther south in Labrador and Newfoundland.

Newfoundland (island)

Newfoundlandisland of NewfoundlandNewfoundland Island
The Arctic hare is distributed over the northernmost regions of Greenland, the Canadian Arctic islands and Northern Canada, including Ellesmere Island, and farther south in Labrador and Newfoundland.

Plateau

plateausmountain plateauplateaux
The Arctic hare is well adapted to conditions found in the tundras, plateaus and treeless coasts of this region, including cold weather and frozen precipitation.

Stoat

ermineMustela ermineastoats
In Newfoundland and southern Labrador, the Arctic hare changes its coat color, moulting and growing new fur, from brown or grey in the summer to white in the winter, like some other Arctic animals including ermine and ptarmigan, enabling it to remain camouflaged as the environment changes. Known predators of the Arctic hare are the Arctic fox (Vulpes lagopus), Red fox (Vulpes vulpes), Wolf (Canis lupus), Mountain lion (Puma concolor), Lynx (Lynx canadensis), Ermine (Mustela erminea), Snowy owl (Bubo scandiacus), Gyrfalcon (Falco rusticolus), Rough-legged hawk (Buteo lagopus) – and occasionally humans.

Rock ptarmigan

ptarmiganLagopus mutusrock
In Newfoundland and southern Labrador, the Arctic hare changes its coat color, moulting and growing new fur, from brown or grey in the summer to white in the winter, like some other Arctic animals including ermine and ptarmigan, enabling it to remain camouflaged as the environment changes.

Canada

CanadianCANCanadians
However, the Arctic hares in the far north of Canada, where summer is very short, remain white all year round.

Herbivore

herbivorousherbivoresherbivory
The Arctic hare is a herbivore, specifically a folivore.

Folivore

folivorousfolivoryleaf-eating
The Arctic hare is a herbivore, specifically a folivore.

Woody plant

woodywoody plantsligneous
Arctic hares feed primarily on woody plants, and willow constitutes 95 percent of their diet year-round.

Willow

Salixwillowssallow
Arctic hares feed primarily on woody plants, and willow constitutes 95 percent of their diet year-round.

Saxifraga

saxifragePepper Saxifragesaxifrages
Arctic hares predominantly consume saxifrage, crowberry, and dwarf willow, but can also eat a variety of other foods, including lichens and mosses, blooms, other species' leaves, twigs and roots, mountain sorrel and macroalgae (seaweed).

Empetrum nigrum

crowberryblack crowberrycrowberries
Arctic hares predominantly consume saxifrage, crowberry, and dwarf willow, but can also eat a variety of other foods, including lichens and mosses, blooms, other species' leaves, twigs and roots, mountain sorrel and macroalgae (seaweed).

Salix herbacea

dwarf willowdwarf willowsLeast willow
Arctic hares predominantly consume saxifrage, crowberry, and dwarf willow, but can also eat a variety of other foods, including lichens and mosses, blooms, other species' leaves, twigs and roots, mountain sorrel and macroalgae (seaweed).

Lichen

lichensphotobiontexciple
Arctic hares predominantly consume saxifrage, crowberry, and dwarf willow, but can also eat a variety of other foods, including lichens and mosses, blooms, other species' leaves, twigs and roots, mountain sorrel and macroalgae (seaweed).

Moss

mossesBryophytaMusci
Arctic hares predominantly consume saxifrage, crowberry, and dwarf willow, but can also eat a variety of other foods, including lichens and mosses, blooms, other species' leaves, twigs and roots, mountain sorrel and macroalgae (seaweed).