Ardashir III

Ardeshir
Ardashir III (Middle Persian 𐭠𐭥𐭲𐭧𐭱𐭲𐭥, New Persian: اردشیر نیکوکار, Ardashir; 621 – 27 April 630) was Sasanian king (shah) of Iran from 6 September 628 to 27 April 630.wikipedia
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Mah-Adhur Gushnasp

In reality, however, he exercised little power and his empire was controlled by his vizier Mah-Adhur Gushnasp, whose duty was to protect the empire until Ardashir became old enough to rule.
Mah-Adhur Gushnasp, also known by the Arabicized form of Mahadharjushnas, was an Iranian nobleman who served as the wuzurg framadār (vizier or prime minister) of the Sasanian Empire during the reign of the child ruler Ardashir III (r.

Shahrbaraz

Sasanid general ShahrbarazShahrvarazShahrwaraz
However, sometime in 629, the Nimruzi withdrew their support for the shah, and started to conspire with the distinguished Iranian general Shahrbaraz to overthrow him.
He usurped the throne from Ardashir III, and was killed by Iranian nobles after forty days.

Narsi

During the same period, a brother of Mah-Adhur Gushnasp named Narsi, was granted with Kashkar as a part of his domains, However, even under a strong vizier, things were still looking grim in Iran; Factionalism had greatly increased among the Iranians, and several powerful factions which had emerged during the reign of Ardashir's grandfather Khosrau II, had gained firm control of important parts of Iran, while the Sasanian state was less-centralized than it had been under Ardashir's predecessors.
In 628, during the reign of Ardashir III, Narsi was granted with Kashkar as a part of his domains, while his brother Mah-Adhur Gushnasp was elected as minister of the empire, and administered the empire greatly.

Boran

BorandukhtPurandokhtPurandokht (Boran)
The Pahlav, under their leader Farrukh Hormizd of the Ispahbudhan clan, responded by supporting Ardashir's aunt Boran as the new ruler of Iran, who subsequently started minting coins in the Pahlav areas of Amol, Nishapur, Gurgan and Ray.
Kavad II died some months later, and was succeeded by his eight-year-old son Ardashir III, who after a rule of nigh two years, was killed and usurped by the Iranian military officer Shahrbaraz.

Kavad II

Kavadh IIKavad II SheroeSiroes
Ardashir was the son of king Kavad II (r.
The grandees (wuzurgan) of the empire elected his eight-year-old son Ardashir III.

Byzantine–Sasanian War of 602–628

Byzantine–Sassanid War of 602–628Byzantine-Sassanid War of 602–628Byzantine–Sasanian War
628) and Anzoy, who was a princess from the Byzantine Empire, which made Ardashir less popular among the Iranians, who had recently been in a long and devastating war against the Byzantines.
Ardashir III, Heraclius' ally Shahrbaraz, and Khosrow's daughters Purandokht and Azarmidokht all succeeded to the throne within months of each other.

Siege of Ctesiphon (629)

captured Ctesiphonbesieged CtesiphonSiege of Ctesiphon
With the support of both the Parsig and Nimruzi, Shahrbaraz captured Ctesiphon and executed Ardashir, Mah-Adhur Gushnasp himself, and many other prominent nobles.
The Siege of Ctesiphon took place on 27 April 629 between the forces of Shahrbaraz and Ardashir III.

Wuzurgan

nobleswuzurgān
After the death of Kavad II, the Wuzurgan elected Ardashir as his successor, who was only a 7-year-old boy.
After the death of Kavadh II, the wuzurgan elected the latter's son Ardashir III, who was only a mere child.

Piruz Khosrow

Fīrūzan
Shahrbaraz, however, was unable to capture the city, and then made an alliance with Piruz Khosrow, the leader of the Parsig, and the previous minister of the Empire during the reign of Ardashir's father.
However, shortly after these events, the Parsig and Pahlav faction came into conflict, which divided the resources of the country, and later resulted in a devastating plague that spread over western Iran, which killed half of the population along with Kavadh II, who was succeeded by Ardashir III.

Farrukh Hormizd

Hormizd VFarrokh Hormizd
The Pahlav, under their leader Farrukh Hormizd of the Ispahbudhan clan, responded by supporting Ardashir's aunt Boran as the new ruler of Iran, who subsequently started minting coins in the Pahlav areas of Amol, Nishapur, Gurgan and Ray.
He was succeeded by his eight year old son Ardashir III, who was killed two years later by the distinguished Iranian general Shahrbaraz, who was in turn murdered forty days later in a coup by Farrukh Hormizd, who helped Boran ascend the throne.

List of shahanshahs of the Sasanian Empire

ShahanshahKing of kings of Iran and Anirancomplete list

Middle Persian

PahlaviPersianMiddle-Persian
Ardashir III (Middle Persian 𐭠𐭥𐭲𐭧𐭱𐭲𐭥, New Persian: اردشیر نیکوکار, Ardashir; 621 – 27 April 630) was Sasanian king (shah) of Iran from 6 September 628 to 27 April 630. Ardashir is the New Persian form of the Middle Persian name Ardašīr/Ardašēr, which is ultimately from Old Iranian *Artaxšaθra-, equivalent to Greek Artaxérxēs, and Armenian Artašēs .

Persian language

PersianNew PersianFarsi
Ardashir III (Middle Persian 𐭠𐭥𐭲𐭧𐭱𐭲𐭥, New Persian: اردشیر نیکوکار, Ardashir; 621 – 27 April 630) was Sasanian king (shah) of Iran from 6 September 628 to 27 April 630. Ardashir is the New Persian form of the Middle Persian name Ardašīr/Ardašēr, which is ultimately from Old Iranian *Artaxšaθra-, equivalent to Greek Artaxérxēs, and Armenian Artašēs .

Sasanian Empire

SassanidSasanianSassanid Empire
Ardashir III (Middle Persian 𐭠𐭥𐭲𐭧𐭱𐭲𐭥, New Persian: اردشیر نیکوکار, Ardashir; 621 – 27 April 630) was Sasanian king (shah) of Iran from 6 September 628 to 27 April 630.

Shah

ShahanshahShahzadaShahzadi
Ardashir III (Middle Persian 𐭠𐭥𐭲𐭧𐭱𐭲𐭥, New Persian: اردشیر نیکوکار, Ardashir; 621 – 27 April 630) was Sasanian king (shah) of Iran from 6 September 628 to 27 April 630.

Iran

PersiaIslamic Republic of IranIranian
Ardashir III (Middle Persian 𐭠𐭥𐭲𐭧𐭱𐭲𐭥, New Persian: اردشیر نیکوکار, Ardashir; 621 – 27 April 630) was Sasanian king (shah) of Iran from 6 September 628 to 27 April 630.

Iranian languages

IranianOld IranianIranian language
Ardashir is the New Persian form of the Middle Persian name Ardašīr/Ardašēr, which is ultimately from Old Iranian *Artaxšaθra-, equivalent to Greek Artaxérxēs, and Armenian Artašēs .

Ancient Greek

GreekClassical GreekGr.
Ardashir is the New Persian form of the Middle Persian name Ardašīr/Ardašēr, which is ultimately from Old Iranian *Artaxšaθra-, equivalent to Greek Artaxérxēs, and Armenian Artašēs .

Classical Armenian

Old ArmenianArmenianClassical
Ardashir is the New Persian form of the Middle Persian name Ardašīr/Ardašēr, which is ultimately from Old Iranian *Artaxšaθra-, equivalent to Greek Artaxérxēs, and Armenian Artašēs .

Byzantine Empire

ByzantineEastern Roman EmpireByzantines
628) and Anzoy, who was a princess from the Byzantine Empire, which made Ardashir less popular among the Iranians, who had recently been in a long and devastating war against the Byzantines.

Al-Tabari

Muhammad ibn Jarir al-TabariTabarial-Ṭabarī
The Iranian historian al-Tabari says the following thing about Mah-Adhur Gushnasp's administration of the Empire; "Mah-Adhur Gushnasp carried on the administration of the kingdom in [such] an excellent fashion, [and with such] firm conduct, [that] no one would have been aware of Ardashir III's youthfulness."

Kashkar

KaškarKaskar
During the same period, a brother of Mah-Adhur Gushnasp named Narsi, was granted with Kashkar as a part of his domains, However, even under a strong vizier, things were still looking grim in Iran; Factionalism had greatly increased among the Iranians, and several powerful factions which had emerged during the reign of Ardashir's grandfather Khosrau II, had gained firm control of important parts of Iran, while the Sasanian state was less-centralized than it had been under Ardashir's predecessors.

Khosrow II

Khosrau IIChosroes IIKhosrow Parviz
During the same period, a brother of Mah-Adhur Gushnasp named Narsi, was granted with Kashkar as a part of his domains, However, even under a strong vizier, things were still looking grim in Iran; Factionalism had greatly increased among the Iranians, and several powerful factions which had emerged during the reign of Ardashir's grandfather Khosrau II, had gained firm control of important parts of Iran, while the Sasanian state was less-centralized than it had been under Ardashir's predecessors.

House of Ispahbudhan

IspahbudhanIspahbudhan familyAspahbad
The Pahlav, under their leader Farrukh Hormizd of the Ispahbudhan clan, responded by supporting Ardashir's aunt Boran as the new ruler of Iran, who subsequently started minting coins in the Pahlav areas of Amol, Nishapur, Gurgan and Ray.

Amol

Amul
The Pahlav, under their leader Farrukh Hormizd of the Ispahbudhan clan, responded by supporting Ardashir's aunt Boran as the new ruler of Iran, who subsequently started minting coins in the Pahlav areas of Amol, Nishapur, Gurgan and Ray.