Arecibo Observatory

AreciboArecibo radio telescopeNational Astronomy and Ionosphere CenterArecibo TelescopeArecibo Planetary RadarArecibo 305m telescopeArecibo dish antennaArecibo echo spectraArecibo Ionospheric ObservatoryArecibo ionospheric observatory and radio telescope
The Arecibo Observatory is a radio telescope in the municipality of Arecibo, Puerto Rico.wikipedia
456 Related Articles

Arecibo, Puerto Rico

AreciboArecibo, PRArecibo, PR Metropolitan Statistical Area
The Arecibo Observatory is a radio telescope in the municipality of Arecibo, Puerto Rico.
The Arecibo Observatory, which until July 2016 was the world's largest radio telescope, is located here.

SETI@home

S23-WikiSetiqueue
The observatory has appeared in film, gaming and television productions, gaining more recognition in 1999 when it began to collect data for the SETI@home project. Arecibo is the source of data for the SETI@home and Astropulse distributed computing projects put forward by the Space Sciences Laboratory at the University of California, Berkeley and was used for the SETI Institute's Project Phoenix observations.
SETI@home searches for possible evidence of radio transmissions from extraterrestrial intelligence using observational data from the Arecibo radio telescope and the Green Bank Telescope.

Cornell University

CornellCornell University PressUniversity of Cornell
From its construction in the 1960s until 2011, the observatory was managed by Cornell University. William E. Gordon of Cornell University oversaw its design, who intended to use it to study the Earth's ionosphere.
The Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico, site of the world's largest single-dish radio telescope, was operated by Cornell under a contract with the National Science Foundation from its construction until 2011.

Observatory

astronomical observatoryobservatoriesastronomical observatories
As of 2018, the observatory is operated by University of Central Florida, Yang Enterprises and UMET, under cooperative agreement with the US National Science Foundation (NSF).
Some of the world's major radio observatories include the Socorro, in New Mexico, United States, Jodrell Bank in the UK, Arecibo in Puerto Rico, Parkes in New South Wales, Australia, and Chajnantor in Chile.

Radar astronomy

radarRadar observationsradar telescope
It is used in three major areas of research: radio astronomy, atmospheric science, and radar astronomy.
There are two radar astronomy facilities that are in regular use, the Arecibo Planetary Radar and the Goldstone Solar System Radar.

National Science Foundation

NSFNational Science Foundation (NSF)U.S. National Science Foundation
As of 2018, the observatory is operated by University of Central Florida, Yang Enterprises and UMET, under cooperative agreement with the US National Science Foundation (NSF).
The idea expanded to encompass the National Optical Astronomy Observatory, the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, the National Solar Observatory, the Gemini Observatory and the Arecibo Observatory, all of which are funded in whole or in part by NSF.

William E. Gordon

William Edwin GordonWilliam Gordon
William E. Gordon of Cornell University oversaw its design, who intended to use it to study the Earth's ionosphere.
He is referred to as the "father of the Arecibo Observatory".

Radio telescope

radio telescopesradiotelescoperadio-telescope
The Arecibo Observatory is a radio telescope in the municipality of Arecibo, Puerto Rico. For more than 50 years, from its completion in 1963 until July 2016 when the Five hundred meter Aperture Spherical Telescope (FAST) in China was completed, the Arecibo Observatory's 1000 ft radio telescope was the world's largest single-aperture telescope.

Hurricane Maria

MariaHurricane Maríahomonymous Atlantic hurricane
On September 21, 2017, high winds associated with Hurricane Maria caused the 430 MHz line feed to break and fall onto the primary dish, damaging about 30 out of 38,000 aluminum panels.
Maria's Category 4 winds broke a 96 ft line feed antenna of the Arecibo Observatory, causing it to fall 500 ft and puncturing the dish below, greatly reducing its ability to function until repairs could be made.

Ionosphere

ionosphericD layerionospheric physics
William E. Gordon of Cornell University oversaw its design, who intended to use it to study the Earth's ionosphere. Although the concept appeared to offer a solution to the tracking problem, there was almost no information on either the physics of re-entry or a strong understanding of the normal composition of the upper layers of the ionosphere.
The major data sources are the worldwide network of ionosondes, the powerful incoherent scatter radars (Jicamarca, Arecibo, Millstone Hill, Malvern, St Santin), the ISIS and Alouette topside sounders, and in situ instruments on several satellites and rockets.

Arecibo message

1974 radio messageArecibo methodArecibo-1974
In 1974, the Arecibo Message, an attempt to communicate with potential extraterrestrial life, was transmitted from the radio telescope toward the globular cluster Messier 13, about 25,000 light-years away.
The message was broadcast into space a single time via frequency modulated radio waves at a ceremony to mark the remodeling of the Arecibo radio telescope in Puerto Rico on 16 November 1974.

List of IEEE milestones

IEEE MilestoneIEEE MilestonesIEEE Milestone in Electrical Engineering
The center was named an IEEE Milestone in 2001.

Neutron star

neutron starsStellar spin-downdying star
In 1968, the discovery of the periodicity of the Crab Pulsar (33 milliseconds) by Lovelace and others provided the first solid evidence that neutron stars exist.
The entire mass of the Earth at neutron star density would fit into a sphere of 305m in diameter (the size of the Arecibo Observatory).

Russell Alan Hulse

Russell HulseRussell A. HulseHulse
In 1974, Hulse and Taylor discovered the first binary pulsar PSR B1913+16, an accomplishment for which they later received the Nobel Prize in Physics.
While working on his Ph.D. dissertation, he was a scholar in 1974 at the Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico of Cornell University.

Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical Telescope

Five hundred meter Aperture Spherical TelescopeFASTFive-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope
For more than 50 years, from its completion in 1963 until July 2016 when the Five hundred meter Aperture Spherical Telescope (FAST) in China was completed, the Arecibo Observatory's 1000 ft radio telescope was the world's largest single-aperture telescope.
The basic design of FAST is similar to the Arecibo Observatory radio telescope.

Hulse–Taylor binary

PSR B1913+16PSR 1913+16Hulse–Taylor binary pulsar
In 1974, Hulse and Taylor discovered the first binary pulsar PSR B1913+16, an accomplishment for which they later received the Nobel Prize in Physics.
Using the Arecibo 305m dish, Hulse and Taylor detected pulsed radio emissions and thus identified the source as a pulsar, a rapidly rotating, highly magnetized neutron star.

Active SETI

METIA Message From EarthHello From Earth
In comparison, METI (Messaging to Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence) refers to the active search by transmitting messages.
As an example, the message sent by Frank Drake from the Arecibo Observatory in 1974 did not have any feature to support mechanisms to cope with the inevitable noise degradation of the interstellar medium.

Joseph Hooton Taylor Jr.

Joseph Hooton Taylor, Jr.Joseph TaylorJoseph H. Taylor
In 1974, Hulse and Taylor discovered the first binary pulsar PSR B1913+16, an accomplishment for which they later received the Nobel Prize in Physics.
In 1974, Hulse and Taylor discovered the first pulsar in a binary system, named PSR B1913+16 after its position in the sky, during a survey for pulsars at the Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico.

Astropulse

Arecibo is the source of data for the SETI@home and Astropulse distributed computing projects put forward by the Space Sciences Laboratory at the University of California, Berkeley and was used for the SETI Institute's Project Phoenix observations.
SETI@home utilizes recorded data from the Arecibo radio telescope and searches for narrow-bandwidth radio signals from space, signifying the presence of extraterrestrial technology.

Einstein@Home

The Einstein@Home distributed computing project has found more than 20 pulsars in Arecibo data.
Einstein@Home examines radio telescope data from the Arecibo Observatory and has in the past analyzed data from Parkes Observatory, searching for radio pulsars.

Aleksander Wolszczan

Alex Wolszczan
The following year, Polish astronomer Aleksander Wolszczan made the discovery of pulsar PSR B1257+12, which later led him to discover its three orbiting planets.
Working with Dale Frail, Wolszczan carried out astronomical observations from the Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico that led them to the discovery of the pulsar PSR B1257+12 in 1990.

PSR B1937+21

PSR B1937+214
In 1982, the first millisecond pulsar, PSR B1937+21, was discovered by Donald C. Backer, Shrinivas Kulkarni, Carl Heiles, Michael Davis, and Miller Goss.
As interplanetary scintillation is associated with compact radio sources, the interplanetary scintillation observations suggested that 4C21.53 might be a supernova remnant, but a pulsar survey carried out at Arecibo Observatory in 1974 by Russell Hulse and Joseph Taylor in the region did not discover a pulsar associated with 4C21.53.

Southern African Large Telescope

SALTSouth African Large Telescope
The idea of a spherical reflecting mirror with a steerable secondary has since been used in optical telescopes, in particular, the Hobby–Eberly Telescope and the Southern African Large Telescope.
This is similar in operation to the Arecibo Radio Telescope.

Gordon Pettengill

Gordon H. Pettengill
On April 7, 1964, soon after it began operating, Gordon Pettengill's team used it to determine that the rotation period of Mercury was not 88 days, as formerly thought, but only 59 days.
From 1963 to 1965 Pettengill served as Associate Director and from 1968 to 1970 as Director of the Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico.

Moon

lunarthe MoonLuna
The telescope also has military intelligence uses, some of which include locating Soviet radar installations by detecting their signals bouncing off the Moon.
However, later radar observations by Arecibo, suggest these findings may rather be rocks ejected from young impact craters.