Argentina

ArgentineARGArgentinianArgentine RepublicArgentineanArgentinesRepublic of ArgentinaARArgentine-bredArgentinians
Argentina, officially the Argentine Republic (República Argentina), is a country located mostly in the southern half of South America.wikipedia
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Chile

Republic of ChileChileanCHI
Sharing the bulk of the Southern Cone with Chile to the west, the country is also bordered by Bolivia and Paraguay to the north, Brazil to the northeast, Uruguay and the South Atlantic Ocean to the east, and the Drake Passage to the south. The second group are advanced hunters and food gatherers which include the Puelche, Querandí and Serranos in the center-east; and the Tehuelche in the south—all of them conquered by the Mapuche spreading from Chile—and the Kom and Wichi in the north.
It borders Peru to the north, Bolivia to the northeast, Argentina to the east, and the Drake Passage in the far south.

Uruguay

UruguayanOriental Republic of UruguayRepublic of Uruguay
Sharing the bulk of the Southern Cone with Chile to the west, the country is also bordered by Bolivia and Paraguay to the north, Brazil to the northeast, Uruguay and the South Atlantic Ocean to the east, and the Drake Passage to the south.
It borders Argentina to its west and Brazil to its north and east, with the Río de la Plata (River of Silver) to the south and the Atlantic Ocean to the southeast.

Paraguay

ParaguayanRepublic of ParaguayEstablished
Sharing the bulk of the Southern Cone with Chile to the west, the country is also bordered by Bolivia and Paraguay to the north, Brazil to the northeast, Uruguay and the South Atlantic Ocean to the east, and the Drake Passage to the south.
It is bordered by Argentina to the south and southwest, Brazil to the east and northeast, and Bolivia to the northwest.

Southern Cone

Cono SurSouthern South AmericaSouthern
Sharing the bulk of the Southern Cone with Chile to the west, the country is also bordered by Bolivia and Paraguay to the north, Brazil to the northeast, Uruguay and the South Atlantic Ocean to the east, and the Drake Passage to the south.
Traditionally, it covers Argentina, Brazil, Chile and Uruguay, bounded on the west by the Pacific Ocean and on the south by the junction between the Pacific and Atlantic oceans, which is the continental area closest to Antarctica (separated by 960 km).

South America

South AmericanSouthSouth-America
Argentina, officially the Argentine Republic (República Argentina), is a country located mostly in the southern half of South America.
It includes twelve sovereign states (Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, Uruguay, and Venezuela), a part of France (French Guiana), and a non-sovereign area (the Falkland Islands, a British Overseas Territory though this is disputed by Argentina).

Buenos Aires

Buenos Aires, ArgentinaCapital federalCity of Buenos Aires
The sovereign state is subdivided into twenty-three provinces (provincias, singular provincia) and one autonomous city (ciudad autónoma), Buenos Aires, which is the federal capital of the nation (Capital Federal) as decided by Congress. The declaration and fight for independence (1810–1818) was followed by an extended civil war that lasted until 1861, culminating in the country's reorganization as a federation of provinces with Buenos Aires as its capital city.
Buenos Aires ( or ; ) is the capital and largest city of Argentina.

Bolivia

BOLBolivianPlurinational State of Bolivia
Sharing the bulk of the Southern Cone with Chile to the west, the country is also bordered by Bolivia and Paraguay to the north, Brazil to the northeast, Uruguay and the South Atlantic Ocean to the east, and the Drake Passage to the south.
It is bordered to the north and east by Brazil, to the southeast by Paraguay, to the south by Argentina, to the southwest by Chile, and to the northwest by Peru.

Argentine Antarctica

Antártida ArgentinaArgentineAntarctica
Argentina claims sovereignty over part of Antarctica, the Falkland Islands (Islas Malvinas), and South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands.
Argentine Antarctica (Antártida Argentina, Sector Antártico Argentino or Argentártida) is a sector of Antarctica claimed by Argentina as part of its national territory consisting of the Antarctic Peninsula and a triangular section extending to the South Pole, delimited by the 25° West and 74° West meridians and the 60° South parallel.

Falkland Islands sovereignty dispute

Sovereignty of the Falkland IslandssovereigntyFalkland Islands
Argentina claims sovereignty over part of Antarctica, the Falkland Islands (Islas Malvinas), and South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands.
Sovereignty over the Falkland Islands (Islas Malvinas) is disputed by Argentina and the United Kingdom.

Argentine Declaration of Independence

declared the Independence of ArgentinaDeclaration of IndependenceIndependence of Argentina
The declaration and fight for independence (1810–1818) was followed by an extended civil war that lasted until 1861, culminating in the country's reorganization as a federation of provinces with Buenos Aires as its capital city.
What today is commonly referred as the Independence of Argentina was declared on July 9, 1816 by the Congress of Tucumán.

Provinces of Argentina

ProvinceprovincesArgentine province
The declaration and fight for independence (1810–1818) was followed by an extended civil war that lasted until 1861, culminating in the country's reorganization as a federation of provinces with Buenos Aires as its capital city.
Argentina is subdivided into twenty-three provinces (provincias, singular provincia) and one autonomous city (ciudad autónoma), Buenos Aires, which is the federal capital of the nation (Capital Federal) as decided by Congress.

Argentine Civil Wars

Argentine Civil Warcivil warcivil wars
The declaration and fight for independence (1810–1818) was followed by an extended civil war that lasted until 1861, culminating in the country's reorganization as a federation of provinces with Buenos Aires as its capital city.
The Argentine Civil Wars were a series of civil wars that took place in Argentina from 1814 to 1880.

Raúl Alfonsín

Raul AlfonsinAlfonsínRaul Alfonsín
The military government persecuted and murdered numerous political critics, activists, and leftists in the Dirty War, a period of state terrorism that lasted until the election of Raúl Alfonsín as President in 1983.
Raúl Ricardo Alfonsín Foulkes (12 March 1927 – 31 March 2009) was an Argentine lawyer and statesman who served as the President of Argentina from 10 December 1983 to 8 July 1989.

Isabel Martínez de Perón

Isabel PerónIsabelIsabel Peron
Following the death of President Juan Perón in 1974, his widow, Isabel Martínez de Perón, ascended to the presidency.
María Estela Martínez Cartas de Perón (born 4 February 1931), better known as Isabel Martínez de Perón or Isabel Perón, served as the 42nd President of Argentina from 1974 to 1976.

Viceroyalty of the Río de la Plata

Río de la PlataViceroyalty of Río de la PlataViceroyalty of Rio de la Plata
Argentina rose as the successor state of the Viceroyalty of the Río de la Plata, a Spanish overseas viceroyalty founded in 1776.
The Viceroyalty was established in 1776 from several former Viceroyalty of Perú dependencies that mainly extended over the Río de la Plata Basin, roughly the present-day territories of Argentina, Chile, Bolivia, Paraguay and Uruguay, extending inland from the Atlantic Coast.

Dirty War

Argentine Dirty WarMaria Eugenia Sampallohuman rights abuses
The military government persecuted and murdered numerous political critics, activists, and leftists in the Dirty War, a period of state terrorism that lasted until the election of Raúl Alfonsín as President in 1983.
The Dirty War (Época del Proceso or Época de los desaparecidos) is the name used by the military junta or civic-military dictatorship of Argentina (dictadura cívico-militar de Argentina) for the period of United States-backed state terrorism in Argentina from 1976 to 1983 as a part of Operation Condor, during which military and security forces and right-wing death squads in the form of the Argentine Anticommunist Alliance (AAA, or Triple A) hunted down any political dissidents and anyone believed to be associated with socialism, left-wing Peronism or the Montoneros movement.

Spanish Argentines

SpanishSpanish ArgentineSpaniards
The country thereafter enjoyed relative peace and stability, with several waves of European immigration, mainly Italians and Spaniards, radically reshaping its cultural and demographic outlook; 62.5% of the population has full or partial Italian ancestry, and the Argentine culture has significant connections to the Italian culture.
Spanish settlement in Argentina, that is the arrival of Spanish emigrants in Argentina, took place first in the period before Argentina's independence from Spain, and again in large numbers during the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

Inca Empire

IncaIncasIncan
The Inca Empire expanded to the northwest of the country in Pre-Columbian times.
At its largest, the empire joined Peru, southwest Ecuador, western and south central Bolivia, northwest Argentina, a large portion of what is today Chile, and a small part of southwest Colombia into a state comparable to the historical empires of Eurasia.

South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands sovereignty dispute

South Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSovereignty of South Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsDisputed with Argentina
Argentina claims sovereignty over part of Antarctica, the Falkland Islands (Islas Malvinas), and South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands.
The sovereignty of South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands is disputed between the United Kingdom and Argentina.

Argentine War of Independence

War of Independencewars of independenceIndependence War
The declaration and fight for independence (1810–1818) was followed by an extended civil war that lasted until 1861, culminating in the country's reorganization as a federation of provinces with Buenos Aires as its capital city.
The territory of modern Argentina was part of the Spanish Viceroyalty of the Río de la Plata, with its capital city in Buenos Aires, seat of government of the Spanish viceroy.

Argentine Constitution of 1853

Constitution of Argentina of 18531853 ConstitutionConstitution
The name "Argentine Confederation" was also commonly used and was formalized in the Argentine Constitution of 1853.
The Argentine Constitution of 1853 is the current constitution of Argentina approved by provincial governments except Buenos Aires Province, who remained separate from the Argentine Confederation until 1859.

Mercosur

MercosulSouthern Cone Common MarketSouthern Common Market
It is also a founding member of the United Nations, World Bank, World Trade Organization, Mercosur, Union of South American Nations, Community of Latin American and Caribbean States and the Organization of Ibero-American States.
Its full members are Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay and Uruguay.

Hispanophone

Spanish-speaking worldSpanish-speakingSpanish-speaking countries
With a mainland area of 2780400 km2, Argentina is the eighth-largest country in the world, the fourth largest in the Americas, the second largest in South America after Brazil, and the largest Spanish-speaking nation.
The majority of people in Argentina, Uruguay, and Chile are largely of European descent; not only of Spanish Europeans, but Italian, Portuguese, German, Polish, Irish, British, etc. In countries like Mexico, there was a process of miscegenation, which resulted in many people having both indigenous and European origins.

Mapuche

AraucanianMapuche peopleMapuches
The second group are advanced hunters and food gatherers which include the Puelche, Querandí and Serranos in the center-east; and the Tehuelche in the south—all of them conquered by the Mapuche spreading from Chile—and the Kom and Wichi in the north.
The Mapuche are a group of indigenous inhabitants of south-central Chile and southwestern Argentina, including parts of present-day Patagonia.

Italian Argentines

Italian ArgentineItalianItalians
The country thereafter enjoyed relative peace and stability, with several waves of European immigration, mainly Italians and Spaniards, radically reshaping its cultural and demographic outlook; 62.5% of the population has full or partial Italian ancestry, and the Argentine culture has significant connections to the Italian culture.
According to a study conducted by National Scientific and Technical Research Council of Argentina, and published in Bilingualism: Language and Cognition (ISSN 1366-7289) The researchers note that this is a relatively recent phenomenon, starting in the early 20th century with the main wave of Southern Italian immigration.