Arguments for and against drug prohibition

criticismdrug legalisationeffectiveness of such policies is debatedongoing debate about drug prohibitionreasons
Supporters of prohibition claim that drug laws have a successful track record suppressing illicit drug use since they were introduced 100 years ago.wikipedia
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Balloon effect

cockroach effect
The "balloon effect" also operates further up the drug commodity chain in countries where drugs are trafficked rather than cultivated.
The balloon effect is an often-cited criticism of United States drug policy.

Psychoactive drug

psychoactivepsychotropicdrug
Hemp, which is a special cultivar of Cannabis Sativa, does not have significant amounts of psychoactive (THC) substances in it, less than 1%.
Because there is controversy about regulation of recreational drugs, there is an ongoing debate about drug prohibition.

Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs

ACMDAdvisory Committee on Drug Dependence
The Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs (ACMD) report on ecstasy, based on a 12-month study of 4,000 academic papers, concluded that it is nowhere near as dangerous as other class A drugs such as heroin and crack cocaine, and should be downgraded to class B. The advice was not followed.

Transform Drug Policy Foundation

Transform Drug Policy Foundation, U.K.
The Science and Technology Select Committee appointed by the House of Commons to inquire into the Government's handling of scientific advice, risk and evidence in policy making agreed with Transform Drug Policy Foundation's view that "Criminal law is supposed to prevent crime, not 'send out' public health messages".

OECD

Organisation for Economic Co-operation and DevelopmentOrganisation for European Economic Co-operationOrganisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)
The licit drug alcohol has current (last 12 months) user rates as high as 80–90% in populations over 14 years of age, and tobacco has historically had current use rates up to 60% of adult populations, yet the percentages currently using illicit drugs in OECD countries are generally below 1% of the population excepting cannabis where most are between 3% and 10%, with six countries between 11% and 17%.

United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime

UNODCUnited Nations Drug Control ProgrammeUN Office on Drugs and Crime
In March, 2007, Antonio Maria Costa, former executive director of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, drew attention to the drug policy of Sweden, arguing:

Drug policy of Sweden

drug policySwedenSweden with its no-tolerance drug policy
In March, 2007, Antonio Maria Costa, former executive director of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, drew attention to the drug policy of Sweden, arguing:

Sifo

Kantar SifoOrvestoSIFO Research International
In 1998, a poll run by SIFO of 1,000 Swedes found that 96% wanted stronger action by government to stop drug abuse, and 95% wanted drug use to remain illegal.

August Vollmer

the first police chief
One of the prominent early critics of prohibition in the United States was August Vollmer, founder of the School of Criminology at University of California, Irvine and former president of the International Association of Chiefs of Police.

University of California, Irvine

UC IrvineUniversity of California at IrvineUniversity of California Irvine
One of the prominent early critics of prohibition in the United States was August Vollmer, founder of the School of Criminology at University of California, Irvine and former president of the International Association of Chiefs of Police.

International Association of Chiefs of Police

International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP)Community Policing AwardNational Association of Chiefs of Police
One of the prominent early critics of prohibition in the United States was August Vollmer, founder of the School of Criminology at University of California, Irvine and former president of the International Association of Chiefs of Police.

The BMJ

British Medical JournalBMJThe British Medical Journal
Stephen Rolles, writing in the British Medical Journal, argues:

Police Foundation

Philadelphia Police Foundation
These conclusions have been reached by a succession of committees and reports including, in the United Kingdom alone, the Police Foundation, the Home Affairs Select Committee, the Prime Minister's Strategy Unit, the Royal Society of Arts, and the UK Drug Policy Consortium.

Home Affairs Select Committee

Home Affairs CommitteeCommons Home Affairs CommitteeHouse of Commons, Home Affairs Committee
These conclusions have been reached by a succession of committees and reports including, in the United Kingdom alone, the Police Foundation, the Home Affairs Select Committee, the Prime Minister's Strategy Unit, the Royal Society of Arts, and the UK Drug Policy Consortium.

Prime Minister's Strategy Unit

Prime Minister's Strategy Unit (PMSU)Strategy unit
These conclusions have been reached by a succession of committees and reports including, in the United Kingdom alone, the Police Foundation, the Home Affairs Select Committee, the Prime Minister's Strategy Unit, the Royal Society of Arts, and the UK Drug Policy Consortium.

Royal Society of Arts

Society of ArtsFRSARoyal Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce
These conclusions have been reached by a succession of committees and reports including, in the United Kingdom alone, the Police Foundation, the Home Affairs Select Committee, the Prime Minister's Strategy Unit, the Royal Society of Arts, and the UK Drug Policy Consortium.

Ian Gilmore

Professor Sir Ian GilmoreIan Thomas GilmoreSir Ian Gilmore
The editor of the British Medical Journal, Dr. Fiona Godlee, gave her personal support to Rolles' call for decriminalisation, and the arguments drew particular support from Sir Ian Gilmore, former president of the Royal College of Physicians, who said we should be treating drugs "as a health issue rather than criminalising people" and "this could drastically reduce crime and improve health".

Bar council

BarAustralian Bar AssociationBar Council's Disciplinary Committee
Nicholas Green, chairman of the Bar Council, made comments in a report in the profession's magazine, in which he said that drug-related crime costs the UK economy about £13bn a year and that there was growing evidence that decriminalisation could free up police resources, reduce crime and recidivism and improve public health.

Drug-related crime

drug bustdrug offensesdrug crimes
Nicholas Green, chairman of the Bar Council, made comments in a report in the profession's magazine, in which he said that drug-related crime costs the UK economy about £13bn a year and that there was growing evidence that decriminalisation could free up police resources, reduce crime and recidivism and improve public health.

New York County Lawyers' Association

New York County Lawyers AssociationNew York County Lawyer's Association
A report sponsored by the New York County Lawyers' Association, one of the largest local bar associations in the United States, argues on the subject of US drug policy: