Aristippus

Aristippus of CyreneAristippAristippus the Elder of Cyrene
Aristippus of Cyrene (c. 435 – c. 356 BCE) was the founder of the Cyrenaic school of Philosophy.wikipedia
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Cyrene, Libya

CyreneArchaeological Site of CyreneCyrenaean
Aristippus of Cyrene (c. 435 – c. 356 BCE) was the founder of the Cyrenaic school of Philosophy. Aristippus, the son of Aritades, was born in Cyrene, Ancient Libya, c. 435 BCE.
It was also the seat of the Cyrenaics, a famous school of philosophy in the fourth century BC, founded by Aristippus, a disciple of Socrates.

Socrates

SocraticSokratesSocrate
He was a pupil of Socrates, but adopted a very different philosophical outlook, teaching that the goal of life was to seek pleasure by circumstances to oneself and by maintaining proper control over both adversity and prosperity. He came to Greece to be present at the Olympic games, where he asked Ischomachus about Socrates, and by his description was filled with so ardent a desire to see Socrates, that he went to Athens for the purpose, and remained with him almost up to the time of his execution in 399. It is related of the Socratic philosopher Aristippus that, being shipwrecked and cast ashore on the coast of the Rhodians, he observed geometrical figures drawn thereon, and cried out to his companions: "Let us be of good cheer, for I see the traces of man."
Other sources include the contemporaneous Antisthenes, Aristippus, and Aeschines of Sphettos.

Hedonism

hedonistichedonisthedonic
His outlook came to be called "ethical hedonism."
Ethical hedonism is said to have been started by Aristippus of Cyrene, a student of Socrates.

Arete of Cyrene

AreteArete (of Cyrene)
Among his pupils was his daughter Arete.
She was the daughter of Aristippus of Cyrene.

Aristippus the Younger

There are indications that he was conflated with his grandson, Aristippus the Younger.
Aristippus the Younger, of Cyrene, was the grandson of Aristippus of Cyrene, and is widely believed to have formalized the principles of Cyrenaic philosophy.

Lais of Corinth

Lais
Diodorus dates him to 366, which agrees very well with the facts known about him, and with the statement, that Lais, the courtesan with whom he was intimate, was born in 421.
Among her clients were the philosopher Aristippus (two of his alleged writings were about Lais) and the Olympic champion Eubotas of Cyrene.

Cyrenaics

CyrenaicCyrenaicismCyrenaic school
Aristippus of Cyrene (c. 435 – c. 356 BCE) was the founder of the Cyrenaic school of Philosophy.
The Cyrenaics or Kyrenaics (Kyrēnaïkoí) were a sensual hedonist Greek school of philosophy founded in the 4th century BCE, supposedly by Aristippus of Cyrene, although many of the principles of the school are believed to have been formalized by his grandson of the same name, Aristippus the Younger.

Theodorus the Atheist

TheodorusTheodorus of CyreneTheodorus Cyrenaicus
Theodorus was a disciple of Aristippus the Younger, grandson of the elder and more celebrated Aristippus.

Sosicrates

Sosicrates of Rhodes
Diogenes Laërtius, on the authority of Sotion and Panaetius, gives a long list of books whose authorship is ascribed to Aristippus, though he also states that according to Sosicrates of Rhodes, Aristippus never wrote anything.
Sosicrates was born on the island Rhodes and is noted, chiefly, for his frequent mention by Diogenes Laërtius in his Lives and Opinions of Eminent Philosophers — referencing Sosicrates as the sole authority behind such facts as Aristippus having written nothing.

Ancient philosophy

classical philosophyAncientclassical
Aristippus (435 – 356 BCE)

Hegesias of Cyrene

Hegesias
He is said by Diogenes Laërtius to have been the pupil of Paraebates, who was a pupil of Epitimedes, who was a pupil of Antipater of Cyrene, who was a pupil of Aristippus (435-c.360 BC).

Anniceris

To each separate action, there is a particular end, namely the pleasure which actually results from it. He differed from Aristippus because he allowed that friendship, patriotism, and similar virtues, were good in themselves; saying that the wise person will derive pleasure from such qualities, even though they cause occasional trouble, and that a friend should be chosen not only for our own need, but for kindness and natural affection.

Ancient Libya

LibyaLibyanLibyans
Aristippus, the son of Aritades, was born in Cyrene, Ancient Libya, c. 435 BCE.

Greece

Greek🇬🇷Greeks
He came to Greece to be present at the Olympic games, where he asked Ischomachus about Socrates, and by his description was filled with so ardent a desire to see Socrates, that he went to Athens for the purpose, and remained with him almost up to the time of his execution in 399.

Ancient Olympic Games

Olympic GamesOlympicOlympics
He came to Greece to be present at the Olympic games, where he asked Ischomachus about Socrates, and by his description was filled with so ardent a desire to see Socrates, that he went to Athens for the purpose, and remained with him almost up to the time of his execution in 399.

Diodorus Siculus

DiodorusDiod.Diodorus of Sicily
Diodorus dates him to 366, which agrees very well with the facts known about him, and with the statement, that Lais, the courtesan with whom he was intimate, was born in 421.

Dionysius I of Syracuse

DionysiusDionysius IDionysius the Elder
He passed part of his life at the court of Dionysius I of Syracuse or Dionysius the Younger, and is also said to have been taken prisoner by Artaphernes, the satrap who drove the Spartans from Rhodes in 396.

Dionysius II of Syracuse

Dionysius IIDionysius the YoungerDionysius
He passed part of his life at the court of Dionysius I of Syracuse or Dionysius the Younger, and is also said to have been taken prisoner by Artaphernes, the satrap who drove the Spartans from Rhodes in 396.

Artaphernes

General Artaphernes
He passed part of his life at the court of Dionysius I of Syracuse or Dionysius the Younger, and is also said to have been taken prisoner by Artaphernes, the satrap who drove the Spartans from Rhodes in 396.

Sparta

SpartanSpartansLacedaemonians
He passed part of his life at the court of Dionysius I of Syracuse or Dionysius the Younger, and is also said to have been taken prisoner by Artaphernes, the satrap who drove the Spartans from Rhodes in 396.

De architectura

Ten Books on ArchitectureOn Architecturebooks of architecture
In Book VI of De architectura, Vitruvius describes Aristippus:

Vitruvius

VitruvianMarcus Vitruvius PollioMarcus P. Vitruvius
In Book VI of De architectura, Vitruvius describes Aristippus:

Rhodes

RhodianRhodiansRodos
He passed part of his life at the court of Dionysius I of Syracuse or Dionysius the Younger, and is also said to have been taken prisoner by Artaphernes, the satrap who drove the Spartans from Rhodes in 396. It is related of the Socratic philosopher Aristippus that, being shipwrecked and cast ashore on the coast of the Rhodians, he observed geometrical figures drawn thereon, and cried out to his companions: "Let us be of good cheer, for I see the traces of man."

Geometry

geometricgeometricalgeometries
It is related of the Socratic philosopher Aristippus that, being shipwrecked and cast ashore on the coast of the Rhodians, he observed geometrical figures drawn thereon, and cried out to his companions: "Let us be of good cheer, for I see the traces of man."

Gymnasium (ancient Greece)

gymnasiumgymnasiagymnasiums
With that he made for the city of Rhodes, and went straight to the gymnasium.