Aristotelian ethics

Aristotle's EthicsethicsAristotelianAristotelian virtue ethicsmoral philosophyAristotelian ethicAristotelian philosophyEthics'' of Aristotle
Aristotle first used the term ethics to name a field of study developed by his predecessors Socrates and Plato.wikipedia
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Nicomachean Ethics

EthicsEthica NicomacheaAristotle's ''Ethics
As Aristotle argues in Book II of the Nicomachean Ethics, the man who possesses character excellence does the right thing, at the right time, and in the right way.
The work, which plays a pre-eminent role in defining Aristotelian ethics, consists of ten books, originally separate scrolls, and is understood to be based on notes from his lectures at the Lyceum.

Eudaimonia

the good lifeEudaimonismeudaemonia
The highest aims are living well and eudaimonia a Greek word often translated as well-being, happiness or "human flourishing".
It is a central concept in Aristotelian ethics and political philosophy, along with the terms "aretē", most often translated as "virtue" or "excellence", and "phronesis", often translated as "practical or ethical wisdom".

Phronesis

phronēsispractical wisdomφρόνησις
The type of wisdom which is required for this is called "prudence" or "practical wisdom" (Greek phronesis), as opposed to the wisdom of a theoretical philosopher (Greek sophia).
In Aristotelian ethics, for example in the Nicomachean Ethics, it is distinguished from other words for wisdom and intellectual virtues – such as episteme and techne.

Eudemian Ethics

Eudemian
Its primary focus is on ethics, making it one of the primary sources available for study of Aristotelian ethics.

Potentiality and actuality

entelechyenergeiapotentiality
Aristotle emphasized the importance of developing excellence (virtue) of character (Greek ēthikē aretē), as the way to achieve what is finally more important, excellent conduct (Greek energeia).
In philosophy, potentiality and actuality are a pair of closely connected principles which Aristotle used to analyze motion, causality, ethics, and physiology in his Physics, Metaphysics, Nicomachean Ethics and De Anima, which is about the human psyche.

Magnanimity

magnanimousMagnificencemegalopsuchia
Although the word magnanimity has a traditional connection to Aristotelian philosophy, it also has its own tradition in English which now causes some confusion.

Virtue ethics

Aretaic turnvirtue theoryvirtue
In fact, virtue ethics takes its inspiration from Aristotle's approach to ethics—in particular, sharing his emphasis on character excellence, and ethical psychology.

Aristotle

AristotelianAristotelesAristote
Aristotle first used the term ethics to name a field of study developed by his predecessors Socrates and Plato.

Ethics

ethicalmoral philosophyethic
Aristotle first used the term ethics to name a field of study developed by his predecessors Socrates and Plato.

Socrates

SocraticSokratesSocrate
Aristotle first used the term ethics to name a field of study developed by his predecessors Socrates and Plato.

Plato

Plato's dialoguesDialogues of PlatoPlatonic dialogues
Aristotle first used the term ethics to name a field of study developed by his predecessors Socrates and Plato.

Politics

politicalpoliticianpolitically
Aristotle regarded ethics and politics as two related but separate fields of study, since ethics examines the good of the individual, while politics examines the good of the City-State.

Virtue

virtuesvirtuouspurity
Aristotle emphasized the importance of developing excellence (virtue) of character (Greek ēthikē aretē), as the way to achieve what is finally more important, excellent conduct (Greek energeia).

Arete

aretēἀρετήArete (excellence)
Aristotle emphasized the importance of developing excellence (virtue) of character (Greek ēthikē aretē), as the way to achieve what is finally more important, excellent conduct (Greek energeia).

Happiness

happyenjoymentJolly
The highest aims are living well and eudaimonia a Greek word often translated as well-being, happiness or "human flourishing".

Sophia

Sophia (disambiguation)
The type of wisdom which is required for this is called "prudence" or "practical wisdom" (Greek phronesis), as opposed to the wisdom of a theoretical philosopher (Greek sophia).

Philosophy

philosophicalphilosopherhistory of philosophy
But despite the importance of practical decision making, in the final analysis the original Aristotelian and Socratic answer to the question of how best to live, at least for the best types of human, was to live the life of philosophy.'

Nicomachus (son of Aristotle)

Nicomachus
Traditionally it was believed that the Nicomachean Ethics and the Eudemian Ethics were either edited by or dedicated to Aristotle's son and pupil Nicomachus and his disciple Eudemus, respectively, although the works themselves do not explain the source of their names.

Lyceum

liceumLyzeumclassical lyceum
Although Aristotle's father was also called Nicomachus, Aristotle's son was the next leader of Aristotle's school, the Lyceum, and in ancient times he was already associated with this work.

Politics (Aristotle)

PoliticsThe PoliticsPolitica
A fourth treatise, Aristotle's Politics, is often regarded as the sequel to the Ethics, in part because Aristotle closes the Nicomachean Ethics by saying that his ethical inquiry has laid the groundwork for an inquiry into political questions (NE X.1181b6-23).

Protrepticus (Aristotle)

ProtrepticusProtreptikosProtrepticus'' (Aristotle)
Fragments also survive from Aristotle's Protrepticus, another work which dealt with ethics.

Sophist

sophistssophistrySophism
The original Socratic questioning on ethics started at least partly as a response to sophism, which was a popular style of education and speech at the time.

Rhetoric

rhetoricianrhetorrhetorical
Sophism emphasized rhetoric, and argument, and therefore often involved criticism of traditional Greek religion and flirtation with moral relativism.

Ancient Greek religion

Greek PolytheismGreek religionGreek
Sophism emphasized rhetoric, and argument, and therefore often involved criticism of traditional Greek religion and flirtation with moral relativism.