Aristotle

AristotelianAristotelesAristoteAristotelianismAristotelian philosophyAristoteleanAristotelAristoteliansAristotle’sAristotelis
Aristotle ( Aristotélēs, ; 384–322 BC) was a Greek philosopher and polymath during the Classical period in Ancient Greece.wikipedia
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Aristotelianism

AristotelianAristotelian philosophyAristotelians
He was the founder of the Lyceum and the Peripatetic school of philosophy and Aristotelian tradition.
Aristotelianism is a tradition of philosophy that takes its defining inspiration from the work of Aristotle.

Peripatetic school

PeripateticPeripateticsPeripateticism
He was the founder of the Lyceum and the Peripatetic school of philosophy and Aristotelian tradition.
Its teachings derived from its founder, Aristotle (384–322 BC), and peripatetic is an adjective ascribed to his followers.

Plato

Plato's dialoguesDialogues of PlatoPlatonic dialogues
Along with his teacher Plato, he has been called the "Father of Western Philosophy".
He is widely considered the pivotal figure in the history of Ancient Greek and Western philosophy, along with his teacher, Socrates, and his most famous student, Aristotle.

Metaphysics

metaphysicalmetaphysicianmetaphysic
His writings cover many subjects – including physics, biology, zoology, metaphysics, logic, ethics, aesthetics, poetry, theatre, music, rhetoric, psychology, linguistics, economics, politics and government.
It has been suggested that the term might have been coined by a first century CE editor who assembled various small selections of Aristotle’s works into the treatise we now know by the name Metaphysics (ta meta ta phusika, 'after the Physics ', another of Aristotle's works).

Poetics (Aristotle)

PoeticsAristotle's PoeticsThe Poetics
His writings cover many subjects – including physics, biology, zoology, metaphysics, logic, ethics, aesthetics, poetry, theatre, music, rhetoric, psychology, linguistics, economics, politics and government.

Western philosophy

Western thoughtWesternlate modern philosophy
Along with his teacher Plato, he has been called the "Father of Western Philosophy".
This included the problems of philosophy as they are understood today; but it also included many other disciplines, such as pure mathematics and natural sciences such as physics, astronomy, and biology (Aristotle, for example, wrote on all of these topics).

Rhetoric

rhetoricianrhetorrhetorical
His writings cover many subjects – including physics, biology, zoology, metaphysics, logic, ethics, aesthetics, poetry, theatre, music, rhetoric, psychology, linguistics, economics, politics and government.
Aristotle defines rhetoric as "the faculty of observing in any given case the available means of persuasion" and since mastery of the art was necessary for victory in a case at law; or for passage of proposals in the assembly; or for fame as a speaker in civic ceremonies; he calls it "a combination of the science of logic and of the ethical branch of politics".

Lyceum (Classical)

LyceumLycaeumAristotle's Lyceum
He was the founder of the Lyceum and the Peripatetic school of philosophy and Aristotelian tradition.
It was best known for the Peripatetic school of philosophy founded there by Aristotle in 334 /.

Athens

Athens, GreeceAthenianAthenians
At seventeen or eighteen years of age, he joined Plato's Academy in Athens and remained there until the age of thirty-seven (c. 347 BC).
A center for the arts, learning and philosophy, home of Plato's Academy and Aristotle's Lyceum, it is widely referred to as the cradle of Western civilization and the birthplace of democracy, largely because of its cultural and political impact on the European continent, and in particular the Romans.

Polymath

Renaissance manpolyhistorHomo Universalis
Aristotle ( Aristotélēs, ; 384–322 BC) was a Greek philosopher and polymath during the Classical period in Ancient Greece.
Other Notable Polymath are : Jose Rizal, Avicenna, Hildegard of Bingen, Michael Servetus, Aristotle, Thomas Young (scientist), Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, Ismail al-Jazari and Shem Kuo.]]

Physics (Aristotle)

PhysicsAristotle's PhysicsPhysica
His writings cover many subjects – including physics, biology, zoology, metaphysics, logic, ethics, aesthetics, poetry, theatre, music, rhetoric, psychology, linguistics, economics, politics and government.
The Physics (Greek: Φυσικὴ ἀκρόασις Phusike akroasis; Latin: Physica, or Naturales Auscultationes, possibly meaning "lectures on nature") is a named text, written in ancient Greek, collated from a collection of surviving manuscripts known as the Corpus Aristotelicum, attributed to the 4th-century BC philosopher Aristotle.

Logic

logicianlogicallogics
His writings cover many subjects – including physics, biology, zoology, metaphysics, logic, ethics, aesthetics, poetry, theatre, music, rhetoric, psychology, linguistics, economics, politics and government.
In the Western World, logic was first developed by Aristotle, who called the subject 'analytics'.

Alexander the Great

AlexanderAlexander III of MacedonAlexander of Macedon
Shortly after Plato died, Aristotle left Athens and, at the request of Philip II of Macedon, tutored Alexander the Great beginning in 343 BC.
During his youth, Alexander was tutored by Aristotle until age 16.

Aristotelian physics

AristotelianphysicsAristotelian theory of gravity
Aristotle's views on physical science profoundly shaped medieval scholarship.
Aristotelian physics is the form of natural science described in the works of the Greek philosopher Aristotle (384–).

Aristotle's biology

texts on biologyhis biologybiology
Some of Aristotle's zoological observations found in his biology, such as on the hectocotyl (reproductive) arm of the octopus, were disbelieved until the 19th century.
Aristotle's biology is the theory of biology, grounded in systematic observation and collection of data, mainly zoological, embodied in Aristotle's books on the science.

Psychology

psychologicalpsychologistpsychologists
His writings cover many subjects – including physics, biology, zoology, metaphysics, logic, ethics, aesthetics, poetry, theatre, music, rhetoric, psychology, linguistics, economics, politics and government.
Historians note that Greek philosophers, including Thales, Plato, and Aristotle (especially in his De Anima treatise), addressed the workings of the mind.

Biology

biologicalBiological Sciencesbiologist
His writings cover many subjects – including physics, biology, zoology, metaphysics, logic, ethics, aesthetics, poetry, theatre, music, rhetoric, psychology, linguistics, economics, politics and government.
While the formal study of medicine dates back to Pharaonic Egypt, it was Aristotle (384–322 BC) who contributed most extensively to the development of biology.

Ancient Greece

Greekancient Greekancient Greeks
Aristotle ( Aristotélēs, ; 384–322 BC) was a Greek philosopher and polymath during the Classical period in Ancient Greece.
Herodotus was succeeded by authors such as Thucydides, Xenophon, Demosthenes, Plato and Aristotle.

Economics

economiceconomisteconomic theory
His writings cover many subjects – including physics, biology, zoology, metaphysics, logic, ethics, aesthetics, poetry, theatre, music, rhetoric, psychology, linguistics, economics, politics and government.
Other notable writers from Antiquity through to the Renaissance include Aristotle, Xenophon, Chanakya (also known as Kautilya), Qin Shi Huang, Thomas Aquinas, and Ibn Khaldun.

Philippa Foot

FootPhilippa R. FootPhilippa Ruth Bosanquet
His ethics, though always influential, gained renewed interest with the modern advent of virtue ethics, such as in the thinking of Alasdair MacIntyre and Philippa Foot.
Philippa Ruth Foot (née Bosanquet; 3 October 1920 – 3 October 2010), an English philosopher, was one of the founders of contemporary virtue ethics, inspired by the ethics of Aristotle.

Peter Abelard

AbelardPierre AbélardAbélard
His works contain the earliest known formal study of logic, studied by medieval scholars such as Peter Abelard and John Buridan.
His father, a knight called Berenger, encouraged Pierre to study the liberal arts, wherein he excelled at the art of dialectic (a branch of philosophy), which, at that time, consisted chiefly of the logic of Aristotle transmitted through Latin channels.

Stagira (ancient city)

StageiraStagiraStagirus
Aristotle was born in the city of Stagira in Northern Greece.
It is chiefly known for being the birthplace of Aristotle, who was a Greek philosopher and polymath, a student of Plato and teacher of Alexander the Great.

Thomas Aquinas

St. Thomas AquinasAquinasSaint Thomas Aquinas
Aristotle was revered among medieval Muslim scholars as "The First Teacher" and among medieval Christians like Thomas Aquinas as simply "The Philosopher".
Unlike many currents in the Church of the time, Thomas embraced several ideas put forward by Aristotle—whom he called "the Philosopher"—and attempted to synthesize Aristotelian philosophy with the principles of Christianity.

Nicomachus (father of Aristotle)

Nicomachus
His father, Nicomachus, died when Aristotle was a child, and he was brought up by a guardian.
Nicomachus (fl. c. 375 BC) was the father of Aristotle.

Platonic Academy

AcademyPlato's AcademyNew Academy
At seventeen or eighteen years of age, he joined Plato's Academy in Athens and remained there until the age of thirty-seven (c. 347 BC).
Aristotle studied there for twenty years (367–347 BC) before founding his own school, the Lyceum.