National League Baltimore Orioles, 1896
Uniform design from late 1990s through mid-2000s
The 1876 White Stockings won the NL championship.
Cy Young, 1911 baseball card
Chase Field
The 1906 Cubs won a record 116 of 154 games. They then won back-to-back World Series titles in 1907–08.
Jackie Robinson comic book, 1951
Randy Johnson pitching for the Arizona Diamondbacks.
1913 Chicago Cubs
1959 World Series action at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum
OF Luis Gonzalez (1999–2006)
Hall of Famer Hack Wilson
Graph showing, by year, the average number of runs per MLB game
All-Star Paul Goldschmidt (2011–2018) had a on-base percentage of .398, during his tenure in Phoenix
Club logo (1927–1936)
Mark McGwire was one of several central figures in baseball's steroids scandal
Current uniform design (2016–present)
Cubs logo (1941–1945)
Cleveland Indians throwback uniform
A sports-related curse that was supposedly placed on the Chicago Cubs by Billy Goat Tavern owner William Sianis during Game 4 of the 1945 World Series.
A Grapefruit League game at the former Los Angeles Dodgers camp in Vero Beach, Florida
Ernie Banks ("Mr. Cub")
President John F. Kennedy throwing out the first pitch at the 1962 All-Star Game at DC Stadium
Ryne Sandberg set numerous league and club records in his career and was elected to the Hall of Fame in 2005.
Rafael Palmeiro (batter), one of the MLB players suspended for steroid use
Andre Dawson, 5× All-Star and 1987 NL MVP during tenure in Chicago
MLB blackout map in the United States
Sammy Sosa was the captain of the Chicago Cubs during his tenure with the team.
Canadian MLB blackout map
Kerry Wood, along with Mark Prior, led the Cubs' rotation in 2003.
MLB blackout map in the United States
Dempster emerged in 2004 and became the Cubs' regular closer.
Alfonso Soriano signed with the club in 2007.
Carlos Zambrano warming up before a game
Starlin Castro during his 2010 rookie season
One of two Cubs building blocks, Anthony Rizzo, swinging in the box
The Cubs celebrate after winning the 2016 World Series.
2016 Champions visit the White House in June 2017.
Clark (left) with the Oriole Bird
Ron Santo
Billy Williams
Ferguson Jenkins
Kiki Cuyler
Mordecai "Three Finger" Brown
Harry Caray

The Diamondbacks compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member club of the National League (NL) West division.

- Arizona Diamondbacks

The Cubs compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as part of the National League (NL) Central division.

- Chicago Cubs

In March 1995, two new franchises, the Arizona Diamondbacks and Tampa Bay Devil Rays (now known as the Tampa Bay Rays), were awarded by MLB, which began play in 1998.

- Major League Baseball

The modern Chicago Cubs and Atlanta Braves franchises trace their histories back to the National Association of Professional Base Ball Players in the 1870s.

- Major League Baseball

Brennaman was the TV announcer for the Chicago Cubs and Cincinnati Reds (along with his father Marty Brennaman) before being hired by Diamondbacks founder Jerry Colangelo in 1996, two years before the team would begin play.

- Arizona Diamondbacks

They met Arizona in the NLDS, but controversy followed as Piniella, in a move that has since come under scrutiny, pulled Carlos Zambrano after the sixth inning of a pitcher's duel with D-Backs ace Brandon Webb, to "....save Zambrano for (a potential) Game 4."

- Chicago Cubs

3 related topics with Alpha

Overall

National League

2 links

Shea Stadium prior to the start of a New York Mets game in 2008. Shea had the best attendance in the National League that year, drawing over 53,000 fans per game on average.
Morgan Bulkeley, the first president of the National League

The National League of Professional Baseball Clubs, known simply as the National League (NL), is the older of two leagues constituting Major League Baseball (MLB) in the United States and Canada, and the world's oldest extant professional team sports league.

The two remaining original NL franchises, Boston and Chicago, remain still in operation today as the Atlanta Braves and the Chicago Cubs.

In 1998, the Arizona Diamondbacks became the league's fifteenth franchise, and the Milwaukee Brewers moved from the AL to the NL, giving the NL 16 teams for the next 15 seasons.

St. Louis Cardinals

2 links

American professional baseball team based in St. Louis.

American professional baseball team based in St. Louis.

Charles Comiskey, shown here circa 1910, guided the Browns to four American Association titles.
Rogers Hornsby won two Triple Crowns as a Cardinal.
Stan Musial retired owning numerous National League and team batting records.
Bob Gibson, the most decorated pitcher in team history, won two Cy Young Awards.
Pitcher Chris Carpenter, essential in two World Series titles, won 10 playoff games with a 3.00 postseason ERA.
Albert Pujols is one of the most accomplished players in Cardinals' history.
Sportsman's Park during the 1946 World Series
Busch Memorial Stadium, home stadium from 1966 to 2005
St. Louis logo (1900–1919)
St. Louis mascot Fredbird, 2013
Red Schoendienst (1965–76, 1980, 1990)
Tony La Russa (1996–2011)
Joe Medwick's Triple Crown in 1937 is the last in the history of the National League
Lou Brock
Dizzy Dean
Curt Flood
Enos Slaughter
Ozzie Smith
Bruce Sutter
Harry Caray

The Cardinals compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member club of the National League (NL) Central division.

In two of these championships, the Browns met the Chicago White Stockings, now the Chicago Cubs, launching the enduring Cardinals–Cubs rivalry.

The Cardinals acquired Paul Goldschmidt in a trade from the Arizona Diamondbacks on December 5, 2018.

Cincinnati Reds

2 links

American professional baseball team based in Cincinnati.

American professional baseball team based in Cincinnati.

Cincinnati Reds baseball team in 1909
Hall of famer Edd Roush led Cincinnati to the 1919 World Series.
Ted Kluszewski (1953)
Crosley Field (pictured in 1969), the Reds' home stadium from 1912 to 1970
Riverfront Stadium (pictured in 1974), the home stadium of the Reds from 1970 to 2002
Pete Rose at bat in a game at Dodger Stadium during the 1970s
George Foster slugged 52 home runs in 1977, earning the NL MVP award.
Eric Davis in 1990
Opening day at Riverfront Stadium, 1995
Great American Ball Park, the Reds' home stadium since 2003
Ken Griffey Jr. played in his hometown of Cincinnati from 2000 to 2008.
Joey Votto, first baseman (2007–present)
Great American Ball Park opened in 2003 along the Ohio River.
Logo (1915–1919)
Scott Rolen wearing the current Reds away uniform, featuring classic lettering.
Barry Larkin playing in Riverfront Stadium in 1990
Frank Robinson
Eppa Rixey
Ernie Lombardi
The Ohio Cup trophy
Marty Brennaman, the Hall of Fame "voice of the Reds"

The Reds compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member club of the National League (NL) Central division, and were a charter member of the American Association in 1881 before joining the NL in 1890.

In, the Reds were in the newly created National League Central Division with the Chicago Cubs, St. Louis Cardinals, and fellow rivals Pittsburgh Pirates and Houston Astros.

In the offseason, the team traded outfielder Drew Stubbs, as part of a three-team deal with the Arizona Diamondbacks and Cleveland Indians, to the Indians, and in turn received right fielder Shin-Soo Choo.