Armenians

ArmenianArmenian peopleArmenian descentArmenian nationethnic ArmenianArmeniaArmenian originArmenian communityArmenian indigenous people Armenian
Armenians (հայեր, hayer ) are an ethnic group native to the Armenian Highlands of Western Asia.wikipedia
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Republic of Artsakh

ArtsakhNagorno-Karabakh RepublicNagorno-Karabakh
Armenians constitute the main population of Armenia and the de facto independent Artsakh. It has two mutually intelligible and written forms: Eastern Armenian, today spoken mainly in Armenia, Artsakh, Iran, and the former Soviet republics; and Western Armenian, used in the historical Western Armenia and, after the Armenian Genocide, primarily in the Armenian diasporan communities.
The region is currently populated mostly by Armenians and the primary spoken language is Armenian.

Armenian Americans

Armenian-AmericanArmenian AmericanArmenian
The largest Armenian populations today exist in Russia, the United States, France, Georgia, Iran, Germany, Ukraine, Lebanon, Brazil and Syria.
Armenian Americans (ամերիկահայեր, amerikahayer) are citizens or residents of the United States who have total or partial Armenian ancestry.

Armenians in Russia

Russian-ArmenianRussian ArmeniansArmenian
The largest Armenian populations today exist in Russia, the United States, France, Georgia, Iran, Germany, Ukraine, Lebanon, Brazil and Syria.
Various figures estimate that the ethnic Armenian population in Russia is actually more than 2 million.

Armenian diaspora

diasporaArmenian descentArmenians
There is a wide-ranging diaspora of around 5 million people of full or partial Armenian ancestry living outside modern Armenia.
The Armenian diaspora refers to the communities of Armenians outside Armenia and other locations where Armenians are considered an indigenous population.

Armenians in Georgia

ArmeniansGeorgiaArmenian
The largest Armenian populations today exist in Russia, the United States, France, Georgia, Iran, Germany, Ukraine, Lebanon, Brazil and Syria.
Armenians in Georgia are Armenian people living within the country of Georgia.

Armenians in Ukraine

ArmeniansArmenian-UkrainianArmenian
The largest Armenian populations today exist in Russia, the United States, France, Georgia, Iran, Germany, Ukraine, Lebanon, Brazil and Syria.
Armenians in Ukraine are ethnic Armenians who live in Ukraine.

Armenians in Lebanon

ArmenianLebanese ArmenianArmenians
The largest Armenian populations today exist in Russia, the United States, France, Georgia, Iran, Germany, Ukraine, Lebanon, Brazil and Syria.
The Armenians in Lebanon (Լիբանանահայեր lipananahayer, اللبنانيون الأرمن) (Libano-Arméniens) are Lebanese citizens of Armenian descent.

Armenians in Germany

GermanyArmenian-GermanGerman-Armenian
The largest Armenian populations today exist in Russia, the United States, France, Georgia, Iran, Germany, Ukraine, Lebanon, Brazil and Syria.
Armenians in Germany are ethnic Armenians living within the modern republic of Germany.

Armenian Genocide

ArmeniangenocideArmenians
With the exceptions of Iran and the former Soviet states, the present-day Armenian diaspora was formed mainly as a result of the Armenian Genocide. It has two mutually intelligible and written forms: Eastern Armenian, today spoken mainly in Armenia, Artsakh, Iran, and the former Soviet republics; and Western Armenian, used in the historical Western Armenia and, after the Armenian Genocide, primarily in the Armenian diasporan communities.
The Armenian Genocide (also known as the Armenian Holocaust) was the systematic mass extermination and expulsion of 1.5 million ethnic Armenians within the Ottoman Empire (most of whom were citizens) by the Ottoman government from approximately 1914 to 1923.

Armenians in Syria

ArmeniansArmenianSyria
The largest Armenian populations today exist in Russia, the United States, France, Georgia, Iran, Germany, Ukraine, Lebanon, Brazil and Syria.
The Armenians in Syria are Syrian citizens of either full or partial Armenian descent.

Armenian Apostolic Church

Armenian ApostolicArmenian ChurchArmenian
Most Armenians adhere to the Armenian Apostolic Church, a non-Chalcedonian church, which is also the world's oldest national church.
The Armenian Apostolic Church is the national church of the Armenian people.

Armenia

ArmenianRepublic of ArmeniaARM
Armenians constitute the main population of Armenia and the de facto independent Artsakh. It has two mutually intelligible and written forms: Eastern Armenian, today spoken mainly in Armenia, Artsakh, Iran, and the former Soviet republics; and Western Armenian, used in the historical Western Armenia and, after the Armenian Genocide, primarily in the Armenian diasporan communities.
The name has traditionally been derived from Hayk, the legendary patriarch of the Armenians and a great-great-grandson of Noah, who, according to the 5th-century AD author Moses of Chorene (Movsis Khorenatsi), defeated the Babylonian king Bel in 2492 BC and established his nation in the Ararat region.

Armenian Brazilians

ArmeniansBrazilArmenia
The largest Armenian populations today exist in Russia, the United States, France, Georgia, Iran, Germany, Ukraine, Lebanon, Brazil and Syria.
Armenian Brazilians (armeno-brasileiro, armênio-brasileiro) are Brazilian persons who are fully, partially, or predominantly of Armenian descent, or Armenian immigrants in Brazil.

Mesrop Mashtots

Saint MesrobMesrob MashtotsSaint Mesrop
The unique Armenian alphabet was invented in 405 AD by Mesrop Mashtots.
Mesrop Mashtots (Մեսրոպ Մաշտոց Mesrop Maštoc; Eastern Armenian: ; Western Armenian: ; Mesrobes Mastosius; 362 – February 17, 440 AD), also known as Mesrob the Vartabed', was an early medieval Armenian linguist, composer, theologian, statesman and hymnologist.

Western Armenia

Turkish ArmeniaTurkish (Western) ArmeniaHistorical Armenia
It has two mutually intelligible and written forms: Eastern Armenian, today spoken mainly in Armenia, Artsakh, Iran, and the former Soviet republics; and Western Armenian, used in the historical Western Armenia and, after the Armenian Genocide, primarily in the Armenian diasporan communities.
Western Armenia (Western Armenian: Արեւմտեան Հայաստան, Arevmdian Hayasdan), located in Western Asia, is a term used to refer to eastern parts of Turkey (formerly the Ottoman Empire) that were part of the historical homeland of the Armenians.

Hayk

HaikForefather HaykHaig
The name has traditionally been derived from Hayk, the legendary patriarch of the Armenians and a great-great-grandson of Noah, who, according to Movses Khorenatsi (Moses of Khorene), defeated the Babylonian king Bel in 2492 BC and established his nation in the Ararat region.
Hayk the Great, or The Great Hayk, also known as Hayk Nahapet (Հայկ Նահապետ, Hayk the "head of family" or patriarch ), is the legendary patriarch and founder of the Armenian nation.

Ethnic group

ethnicityethnicethnic groups
Armenians (հայեր, hayer ) are an ethnic group native to the Armenian Highlands of Western Asia.
In many cases, more than one aspect determines membership: for instance, Armenian ethnicity can be defined by citizenship of Armenia, native use of the Armenian language, or membership of the Armenian Apostolic Church.

Aram (given name)

AramAram-Naharin
Khorenatsi wrote that the word Armenian originated from the name Armenak or Aram (the descendant of Hayk).
Aram is an Armenian patriarch in the History of Armenia, and a popular masculine name in Armenian.

Urartu

UrartianUrartiansKingdom of Urartu
In his trilingual Behistun Inscription dated to 517 BC, Darius I the Great of Persia refers to Urashtu (in Babylonian) as Armina (in Old Persian; Armina and Harminuya (in Elamite). Soon after Hayasa-Azzi came Arme-Shupria (1300s–1190 BCE), the Nairi Confederation (1200–900 BCE), and the Kingdom of Urartu (860–590 BCE), who successively established their sovereignty over the Armenian Highland.
Being heirs to the Urartian realm, the earliest identifiable ancestors of the Armenians are the peoples of Urartu.

Turkey

TurkishRepublic of TurkeyTUR
At its zenith (95–65 BCE), under the imperial reign of Tigran the Great, a member of the Artaxiad (Artashesian) dynasty, the Kingdom of Armenia extended from the Caucasus all the way to what is now central Turkey, Lebanon, and northern Iran.
At various points in its history, the region has been inhabited by diverse civilisations including the Assyrians, Greeks, Thracians, Phrygians, Urartians, and Armenians.

Old Persian

PersianOld Persian languageancient Persian
In his trilingual Behistun Inscription dated to 517 BC, Darius I the Great of Persia refers to Urashtu (in Babylonian) as Armina (in Old Persian; Armina and Harminuya (in Elamite).
He relates that the Armenian people spoke a language that to his ear sounded like the language of the Persians.

Armenian Highlands

Armenian HighlandArmeniaArmenian Plateau
Armenians (հայեր, hayer ) are an ethnic group native to the Armenian Highlands of Western Asia. Soon after Hayasa-Azzi came Arme-Shupria (1300s–1190 BCE), the Nairi Confederation (1200–900 BCE), and the Kingdom of Urartu (860–590 BCE), who successively established their sovereignty over the Armenian Highland.
During Antiquity, it was known as "Armenia Major," a central region to the history of Armenians, and one of the four geo-political regions associated with Armenians, the other three being Armenia Minor, Sophene, and Commagene.

Muslim conquest of Persia

Islamic conquest of PersiaArab conquest of IranArab invasion of Iran
Armenia lost its sovereignty again in 428 CE to the rivaling Byzantine and Sassanid Persian empires, until the Muslim conquest of Persia overran also the regions in which Armenians lived.
When Western academics first investigated the Muslim conquest of Persia, they relied solely on the accounts of the Armenian Christian bishop Sebeos, and accounts in Arabic written some time after the events they describe.

Armenian Genocide recognition

Recognition of the Armenian Genociderecognitionrecognized
(See Recognition of the Armenian Genocide)
Armenian Genocide recognition is the formal acceptance that the systematic massacres and forced deportation of Armenians committed by the Ottoman Empire from 1915 to 1923, during and after the First World War, constituted genocide.

Nairi

Nairi ConfederationNairi (people)Na’iri
Soon after Hayasa-Azzi came Arme-Shupria (1300s–1190 BCE), the Nairi Confederation (1200–900 BCE), and the Kingdom of Urartu (860–590 BCE), who successively established their sovereignty over the Armenian Highland.
The word is also used to describe the Armenian tribes who lived there.