Ratification of the Treaty of Münster, 1648
The Treaty of Versailles, signed at the conclusion of World War I
The announcing of the armistice on November 11, 1918 was the occasion for large celebrations in the Allied nations.
The "Peace Memorial" about the Treaty of Nöteborg at the Orekhovy Island
Armistice of Cassibile between Italians and Anglo-Americans (1943)
Tablet of one of the earliest recorded treaties in history, Treaty of Kadesh, at the Istanbul Archaeology Museum
Delegates sign the Korean Armistice Agreement
Peace-treaty of Zadar (1358), which ended the war between the Croato-Hungarian Kingdom and the Republic of Venice, forcing the latter to withdraw from Croatian coast

It is different from an armistice, which is an agreement to stop hostilities; a surrender, in which an army agrees to give up arms; or a ceasefire or truce, in which the parties may agree to temporarily or permanently stop fighting.

- Peace treaty

An armistice is a modus vivendi and is not the same as a peace treaty, which may take months or even years to agree on.

- Armistice
Ratification of the Treaty of Münster, 1648

2 related topics

Alpha

A truce – not a compromise, since a chance for high-toned gentlemen to retire gracefully from their very civil declarations of war.
By Thomas Nast in Harper's Weekly, February 17, 1877, p. 132.

Ceasefire

Temporary stoppage of a war in which each side agrees with the other to suspend aggressive actions.

Temporary stoppage of a war in which each side agrees with the other to suspend aggressive actions.

A truce – not a compromise, since a chance for high-toned gentlemen to retire gracefully from their very civil declarations of war.
By Thomas Nast in Harper's Weekly, February 17, 1877, p. 132.
British and German officers after arranging the German handover of the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp and the surrounding area, negotiated during a temporary truce, April 1945

A ceasefire is usually more limited than a broader armistice, which is a formal agreement to end fighting.

Ceasefires may be abused by parties as cover to re-arm or reposition forces, and they typically fail, when they are referred to as 'failed ceasefires'; however, successful ceasefires may be followed by armistices and then by peace treaties.

Delegates of both belligerent sides signing the Korean Armistice Agreement in Panmunjom, marking the beginning of the still-existing ceasefire between the two Koreas

Korean Armistice Agreement

Delegates of both belligerent sides signing the Korean Armistice Agreement in Panmunjom, marking the beginning of the still-existing ceasefire between the two Koreas
The site of negotiations in 1951
The English text of Korean Armistice Agreement. Harrison's signature in the lower left corner.
Colonel-level discussions between the US and North Korean militaries on 11 October 1951
The building where the armistice was signed, now housing the North Korea Peace Museum
The Demilitarized Zone compared to the earlier 38th parallel de facto border
Depiction of a banner during a 1989 student festival in Pyongyang, prior to calls from North Korea to leave the agreement.

The Korean Armistice Agreement (한국정전협정 / 조선정전협정; ) is an armistice that brought about a complete cessation of hostilities of the Korean War.

No formal peace treaty was signed and normalized relations were not restored.