Function of an APFSDS sabot red: propellant orange: long rod penetrator yellow: propellant gases green: sabot blue: gun barrel
Swedish "37/24 mm slpprj m/49" APDS projectile for the Bofors 37 mm anti-tank gun from 1949. 37/24 indicates full-calibre with sabot and sub-calibre without sabot — 37 /. Left object shows the projectile with sabot, central object shows projectile without sabot and the right object is the projectile's tungsten-core.
American 120 mm M829A2 APFSDS shell.
A modern APFSDS-T projectile shortly after muzzle exit, just as the sabot petals are separating from the penetrator.
Lead bullet being supported by a wooden cup sabot in a Delvigne gun.
Diagram showing the operation of the discarding sabot on APDS-projectiles. This example uses a "spindle-sabot".
Series of individual 1/1,000,000 second exposures showing shotgun firing shot and expanding cup sabot separation.
Cup sabot function
thumb|Sabot shell with cup sabot for an 1824 Paixhans gun.
Expanding cup sabot function
.30-06 cartridge with expanding cup sabot projectile.
Base sabot function
APDS-projectile with base sabot and "support ring" sabot.
Spindle sabot function
French OFL 120 F1 APFSDS long rod penetrator with "saddle-back" spindle sabot.
Ring sabot function.
Soviet 125 mm BM-15 long rod penetrator projectile with ring sabot.

Each projectile consists of a sub-calibre round fitted with a sabot.

- Armour-piercing discarding sabot

To make up this difference in diameter, a properly designed sabot provides less parasitic mass than if the flight projectile were made full-bore, in particular providing dramatic improvement in muzzle velocity for APDS (Armor-piercing discarding sabot) and APFSDS ammunition.

- Sabot (firearms)
Function of an APFSDS sabot red: propellant orange: long rod penetrator yellow: propellant gases green: sabot blue: gun barrel

2 related topics

Alpha

French anti-tank round with its sabot

Kinetic energy penetrator

Type of ammunition designed to penetrate vehicle armour using a flechette-like, high-sectional density projectile.

Type of ammunition designed to penetrate vehicle armour using a flechette-like, high-sectional density projectile.

French anti-tank round with its sabot
A partly cut-away 30 × 173 mm APFSDS-T round

Firing a small-diameter projectile wrapped in a lightweight outer shell, called a sabot, raises the muzzle velocity.

Between 1941 and 1943, the British combined the two techniques in the armour-piercing discarding sabot (APDS) round.

APFSDS at point of separation of sabot

Armour-piercing fin-stabilized discarding sabot

Type of kinetic energy penetrator ammunition used to attack modern vehicle armor.

Type of kinetic energy penetrator ammunition used to attack modern vehicle armor.

APFSDS at point of separation of sabot
Modern 120 mm tank gun shells

As an armament for main battle tanks, it succeeds Armor-Piercing Discarding Sabot (APDS) ammunition, which is still used in small or medium caliber weapon systems.

Complicating matters, when foreign deployment of military forces or export sales markets are considered, a sabot designed specifically to launch a DU penetrator cannot simply be used to launch a substitute WHA penetrator, even of exactly the same manufactured geometry.