APFSDS at point of separation of sabot
Function of an APFSDS sabot red: propellant orange: long rod penetrator yellow: propellant gases green: sabot blue: gun barrel
Modern 120 mm tank gun shells
American 120 mm M829A2 APFSDS shell.
Lead bullet being supported by a wooden cup sabot in a Delvigne gun.
Series of individual 1/1,000,000 second exposures showing shotgun firing shot and expanding cup sabot separation.
Cup sabot function
thumb|Sabot shell with cup sabot for an 1824 Paixhans gun.
Expanding cup sabot function
.30-06 cartridge with expanding cup sabot projectile.
Base sabot function
APDS-projectile with base sabot and "support ring" sabot.
Spindle sabot function
French OFL 120 F1 APFSDS long rod penetrator with "saddle-back" spindle sabot.
Ring sabot function.
Soviet 125 mm BM-15 long rod penetrator projectile with ring sabot.

Refer to the two armor-piercing fin-stabilized discarding sabot (APFSDS) pictures on the right to see the substantial material nature of a sabot to fill the bore diameter around the sub-caliber arrow-type flight projectile, compared to the very small gap sealed by a driving band or obturator to mitigate what is known classically as windage.

- Sabot (firearms)

Complicating matters, when foreign deployment of military forces or export sales markets are considered, a sabot designed specifically to launch a DU penetrator cannot simply be used to launch a substitute WHA penetrator, even of exactly the same manufactured geometry.

- Armour-piercing fin-stabilized discarding sabot
APFSDS at point of separation of sabot

3 related topics

Alpha

French anti-tank round with its sabot

Kinetic energy penetrator

Type of ammunition designed to penetrate vehicle armour using a flechette-like, high-sectional density projectile.

Type of ammunition designed to penetrate vehicle armour using a flechette-like, high-sectional density projectile.

French anti-tank round with its sabot
A partly cut-away 30 × 173 mm APFSDS-T round

Modern KEP munitions are typically of the armour-piercing fin-stabilized discarding sabot (APFSDS) type.

Firing a small-diameter projectile wrapped in a lightweight outer shell, called a sabot, raises the muzzle velocity.

Swedish "37/24 mm slpprj m/49" APDS projectile for the Bofors 37 mm anti-tank gun from 1949. 37/24 indicates full-calibre with sabot and sub-calibre without sabot — 37 /. Left object shows the projectile with sabot, central object shows projectile without sabot and the right object is the projectile's tungsten-core.

Armour-piercing discarding sabot

Type of spin-stabilized kinetic energy projectile for anti-armour warfare.

Type of spin-stabilized kinetic energy projectile for anti-armour warfare.

Swedish "37/24 mm slpprj m/49" APDS projectile for the Bofors 37 mm anti-tank gun from 1949. 37/24 indicates full-calibre with sabot and sub-calibre without sabot — 37 /. Left object shows the projectile with sabot, central object shows projectile without sabot and the right object is the projectile's tungsten-core.
A modern APFSDS-T projectile shortly after muzzle exit, just as the sabot petals are separating from the penetrator.
Diagram showing the operation of the discarding sabot on APDS-projectiles. This example uses a "spindle-sabot".

Each projectile consists of a sub-calibre round fitted with a sabot.

APDS-rounds were commonly used in large calibre tank guns up until the early 1980s, but have since been superseded by armour-piercing fin-stabilized discarding sabot (APFSDS) projectiles, which use fin-stabilization and can be fired from smoothbore guns.

M829A2 cross-section

M829

[[File:M829.jpg|thumb|150px|

[[File:M829.jpg|thumb|150px|

M829A2 cross-section

The M829 is an American armor-piercing, fin-stabilized, discarding sabot (APFSDS) tank round.