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Army Air Forces Eastern Flying Training Command

EasternSouth Eastern Training CenterSoutheast
The Southeast Air Corps Training Center headquartered at Maxwell Field, Alabama, managed those in the eastern third of the nation, basically east of the Mississippi River. This was upgraded to a command level on 31 July 1943 and re-designated as the Eastern Flying Training Command
It was assigned to the Army Air Forces Training Command, stationed at Maxwell Field, Alabama.

Chanute Air Force Base

Chanute FieldChanute Aviation Field112th Aero Squadron
The mechanic school at Kelly Field, Texas (later Chanute Field, Illinois) emphasized technical training, and for the following two decades, the amount of military training provided to new enlisted personnel undergoing technical instruction varied with their unit commanders, who had sole responsibility for the program.
To rectify this problem, the Air Corps established the Technical Training Command on 26 March 1941, headquartered at Chanute Field.

Operational - Replacement Training Units

Operational Training UnitOperationalOperational Training Unit and Replacement Training Unit
=: see also: Operational - Replacement Training Units
Unlike the schools of the Army Air Forces Training Command (AAFTC), OTU-RTU units were operational units of the four domestic numbered air forces along with I Troop Carrier Command and Air Transport Command, with the mission of final phase training new pilots or crews.

I Troop Carrier Command

Air Transport CommandAir Transport Command (later I Troop Carrier Command)
I Troop Carrier Command performed the special task of training transport units and replacement pilots for air movement of troops and equipment.
I TCC coordinated its activity with the Army Air Forces Training Command, from which it drew its crews, with the four continental air forces which carried the main responsibility for operational and replacement (OTU/RTU) training, and with Army Ground Forces agencies for which its training was conducted.

Second Air Force

2nd Air Force2d Air ForceSecond
B-29 Superfortress Transition Training Until the fall of 1944, Second Air Force provided all B-29 Superfortress transition training for the Army Air Forces. Then, on 12 September 1944, HQ AAF directed Training Command to establish B-29 schools for the transition of crews consisting of pilots, copilots, and flight engineers. By late September, plans called for five schools to provide transition training in very heavy bombers, including a school for the TB-32 Dominator at Fort Worth, Texas. Training of pilots and flight engineers as instructors got underway at Maxwell Field, Alabama, on 20 September 1944, when the school took over facilities previously used for B-24 Liberator training. Limited availability of B-29s restricted training, but by November regular training of crews had begun at Maxwell on B-29s stripped of their armament and gear. Further expansion of training was limited by continued delays in the delivery of B-29s, so Second Air Force continued to provide the bulk of B-29 transition training.
It received graduates from Army Air Forces Training Command flight schools; navigator training; flexible gunnery schools and various technical schools, organized them into newly activated combat groups and squadrons, and conducted operational unit training (OTU) and replacement training (RTU) to prepare groups and replacements for deployment overseas to combat theaters.

Technical Division, Air Training Command

Eastern Technical Training CommandFirstTechnical School
AAFTC was created as a result of the merger of the Army Air Forces Flying Training Command and the Army Air Forces Technical Training Command on 31 July 1943.
Army Air Forces Training Command, 31 July 1943

Third Air Force

3rd Air Force3d Air ForceThird
Third Air Force trained light and medium bomber (A-20, A-26, B-25, B-26) units and also photo-reconnaissance units and pilots.
It received graduates of Army Air Forces Training Command flight schools; navigator training; flexible gunnery schools and various technical schools, organized them into combat groups and squadrons, and provided operational unit training (OTU) and replacement training (RTU) to prepare groups and replacements for deployment overseas to combat theaters.

Lowry Air Force Base

Lowry FieldLowry AAFLowry AFB
In putting together the curriculum for training pilots and copilots on the B-29 Superfortress, Training Command could make use of its experience in transition training for heavy bombers. No such experience was available in the case of flight engineers, because the B-29 was the first AAF aircraft that required a flight engineer. This individual operated the engine control panel of the aircraft. Located behind the pilot, the panel contained all operating instruments but those the pilot used to control the altitude and direction of the B-29. At the direction of the pilot, the flight engineer used these instruments to adjust the throttles, fuel mixture, supercharger, and propeller pitch. He also computed the aircraft's cruising range, fuel consumption, engine performance, weight and balance, and airworthiness. Flight engineers underwent comprehensive training at Amarillo and Lowry Fields before assignment to B-29 transition training.
Lowry transferred under Technical Training Command in mid-October 1945 (Air Training Command on 1 July 1946) and by the end of 1945, Lowry's separation center was processing an average of 300 discharges a day.

United States Army Air Forces

USAAFArmy Air ForcesU.S. Army Air Forces
Re-designated on or about 15 March 1942, after the Army Air Forces became an autonomous arm of the United States Army.
Army Air Forces Training Command

First Air Force

1st Air ForceFirstAFNORTH
First Air Force and Fourth Air Force trained fighter units. First Air Force generally trained P-47 Thunderbolt groups and replacement pilots, while Fourth Air Force trained P-38 Lighting two-engine groups and replacements. P-51 groups and pilots were trained generally equally by both air forces.
It received graduates of Army Air Forces Training Command flight schools; navigator training; flexible gunnery schools and various technical schools, organized them into newly activated combat groups and squadrons, and provided operational unit training (OTU) and replacement training (RTU) to prepare groups and replacements for deployment overseas to combat theaters.

Fourth Air Force

4th Air ForceFourth4 Air Force
First Air Force and Fourth Air Force trained fighter units. First Air Force generally trained P-47 Thunderbolt groups and replacement pilots, while Fourth Air Force trained P-38 Lighting two-engine groups and replacements. P-51 groups and pilots were trained generally equally by both air forces.
It received graduates of Army Air Forces Training Command flight schools; navigator training; flexible gunnery schools and various technical schools, organized them into newly activated combat groups and squadrons, and provided operational unit training (OTU) and replacement training (RTU) to prepare groups and replacements for deployment overseas to combat theaters.

Western Technical Training Command

Eastern (later Western) Technical Training CommandFourth Technical Training DistrictWestern
Fourth District in Denver was renamed the Western Technical Training Command (WTTC)
It was assigned to the Army Air Forces Training Command, and stationed at Denver, Colorado throughout its existence.

Central Technical Training Command

Central (later Eastern) Technical Training Command
Second District in St Louis was renamed the Central Technical Training Command (CTTC)
It was assigned to the Army Air Forces Training Command, stationed at Saint Louis, Missouri.

Air Training Command

Army Air Forces Training CommandArmy Air Forces Flying Training CommandATC
On 1 July 1946, AAF Training Command was redesignated as Air Training Command.
ATC was organized on 1 July 1946 as a re-designation of Army Air Forces Training Command (AAFTC) as part of the re-organization of the United States Army Air Forces (USAAF) after World War II.

29th Flying Training Wing (U.S. Army Air Forces)

29th Flying Training Wing (World War II)29th Flying Training Wing
29th Flying Training Wing (World War II) Primary Flight Training
The wing controlled World War II Phase One primary flying training units of the Army Air Forces Training Command.

Flying Division, Air Training Command

Gulf Coast (later Central)Gulf Coast AAF Training CenterGulf Coast ACTC
The Gulf Coast Air Corps Training Center at Randolph Field handled those in the central sector, from west of the Mississippi River to the Rocky Mountains. This was upgraded to a command level on 31 July 1943 and re-designated as the Central Flying Training Command

Buckingham Army Airfield

Buckingham Army Airfield, Florida, 25 August 1943 – 16 June 1946
It was active during World War II as an Army Air Forces Training Command airfield.

31st Flying Training Wing (World War II)

31st Flying Training Wing31st Flying Training Wing (Primary)
31st Flying Training Wing (Primary)
The squadron was a World War II Command and Control unit, its mission to flying training units of the Army Air Forces Training Command.

27th Flying Training Wing (U.S. Army Air Forces)

27th Flying Training Wing (World War II)
27th Flying Training Wing (World War II) Basic Flight Training
While its direct superior, regional flying training command did change twice, ultimately it was part of Army Air Forces Training Command.

Naval Air Station Joint Reserve Base Fort Worth

NAS JRB Fort WorthCarswell Air Force BaseCarswell Field
Fort Worth Army Airfield, Texas, 31 May – 30 December 1945
The first unit assigned to the base was the Army Air Forces Training Command Combat Crew School on 1 July 1942.

36th Flying Training Wing (U.S. Army Air Forces)

36th Flying Training Wing (World War II)36th Flying Training Wing
36th Flying Training Wing Primary Flight Training
The wing directed flying training units of the Army Air Forces Training Command.

Langley Air Force Base

Langley FieldLangley AFBLangley
In 1922, the school was expanded when the photography school at Langley Field, Virginia, and the communications school at Fort Sill, Oklahoma, both joined the mechanics course at Chanute, congregating all technical training in the Air Service at that location.
Army Air Forces Training Command, 15 Sep 1944

74th Flying Training Wing (World War II)

74th Flying Training Wing74th Flying Training Wing (preflight)
74th Flying Training Wing (World War II) Classification/Preflight/Specialized/Navigation
Army Air Forces Training Command

Randolph Air Force Base

Randolph FieldRandolphRandolph AFB
The Gulf Coast Air Corps Training Center at Randolph Field handled those in the central sector, from west of the Mississippi River to the Rocky Mountains. This was upgraded to a command level on 31 July 1943 and re-designated as the Central Flying Training Command The United States Congress funded the new field's construction but not the purchase of the land, so the city of San Antonio borrowed the $546,000 needed to purchase the site selected for what became Randolph Field.
Class 42-X gave 235 pilots their wings in an experimental course that sent pilot candidates directly to instructor training without first attending primary school, but though the course was considered a success, AAF Flying Training Command rejected its adoption.

San Angelo Army Air Field

San Angelo Army Airfield, Texas, 8 January 1943
The base was activated on 1 June 1942 and jurisdiction was transferred to the Army Air Forces Training Command.