Army Reserve (United Kingdom)

Territorial ArmyArmy ReserveTerritorialTerritorial and Army Volunteer ReserveTAReserve of OfficersTAVRReserveTerritorial ForceTerritorials
The Army Reserve is the active-duty volunteer reserve force and integrated element of the British Army.wikipedia
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British Army

ArmyBritishBritish troops
The Army Reserve is the active-duty volunteer reserve force and integrated element of the British Army.
, the British Army comprises just over 81,500 trained regular (full-time) personnel and just over 27,000 trained reserve (part-time) personnel.

Yeomanry

Yeoman CavalryYeomanry CavalryYeoman
The Army Reserve was created as the Territorial Force in 1908 by the Secretary of State for War, Richard Haldane, when the Territorial and Reserve Forces Act 1907 combined the previously civilian-administered Volunteer Force, with the mounted Yeomanry (at the same time the Militia was renamed the Special Reserve).
Yeomanry is a designation used by a number of units or sub-units of the British Army Reserve, descended from volunteer cavalry regiments.

Territorial Force

territorialTFTerritorial Force Association
The Army Reserve was previously known as the Territorial Force from 1908 to 1921, the Territorial Army (TA) from 1921 to 1967, the Territorial and Army Volunteer Reserve (TAVR) from 1967 to 1979, and again the Territorial Army (TA) from 1979 to 2014.
It was demobilised after the war and reconstituted in 1921 as the Territorial Army.

Volunteer Force

VolunteerVolunteer movementVolunteers
The Army Reserve was created as the Territorial Force in 1908 by the Secretary of State for War, Richard Haldane, when the Territorial and Reserve Forces Act 1907 combined the previously civilian-administered Volunteer Force, with the mounted Yeomanry (at the same time the Militia was renamed the Special Reserve).
Most of the regiments of the present Territorial Army Infantry, Artillery, Engineers and Signals units are directly descended from Volunteer Force units.

London Regiment (1993)

London RegimentThe London Regiment
Only one infantry unit, the London Regiment, has maintained a separate identity.
The London Regiment is an infantry regiment in the Army Reserve of the British Army.

Volunteer Reserves (United Kingdom)

Volunteer Reservesvolunteer reserveVolunteer List
The Army Reserve is the active-duty volunteer reserve force and integrated element of the British Army.
For example, almost every major military operation has seen the deployment of Army Reservists alongside the Regular British Army.

32 (Scottish) Signal Regiment

32 Signal Regiment32 (Scottish) Signal Regiment (Volunteers)32nd (Scottish) Signal Regiment
Several reserve units were also deployed with regular formations and the first territorial unit to see action on the Western Front was the Glasgow Territorial Signallers Group, Royal Engineers at the First Battle of Ypres on 11 October 1914.
The 32nd Signal Regiment is a British Army Reserve Regiment of the Royal Corps of Signals.

Officer (armed forces)

officercommissionedofficers
Each regiment or battalion had a Regular Army officer attached as full-time adjutant.
In the British Army, commissioning for DE officers occurs after a 44-week course at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst for regular officers or the Army Reserve Commissioning Course, which consists of four two-week modules (A-D) for Army Reserve officers.

Richard Haldane, 1st Viscount Haldane

Richard HaldaneLord HaldaneViscount Haldane
The Army Reserve was created as the Territorial Force in 1908 by the Secretary of State for War, Richard Haldane, when the Territorial and Reserve Forces Act 1907 combined the previously civilian-administered Volunteer Force, with the mounted Yeomanry (at the same time the Militia was renamed the Special Reserve).
He was accredited as an efficient bureaucratic leader, notably founding the Territorial Army in a Second Memorandum.

56th (London) Infantry Division

1st London Division56th (London) Division56th (1/1st London) Division
The 56th (London) Infantry Division was a Territorial Army infantry division of the British Army, which served under several different titles and designations.

British Expeditionary Force (World War II)

British Expeditionary ForceBEFSecond British Expeditionary Force
The TA's war deployment plan envisioned the divisions being deployed, as equipment became available, in waves to reinforce the British Expeditionary Force (BEF) that had already been dispatched to Europe.
The bulk of the extra money went to the Royal Navy and the Royal Air Force but plans were made to re-equip a small number of Army and Territorial Army divisions for service overseas.

42nd (East Lancashire) Infantry Division

42nd (East Lancashire) DivisionEast Lancashire Division42nd Division
Disbanded after the war, it was reformed in the Territorial Army (TA), in the Second World War it served as the 42nd (East Lancashire) Infantry Division with the British Expeditionary Force (BEF) and fought in Belgium and France before being evacuated at Dunkirk.

47th (London) Infantry Division

2nd London Division2nd London Infantry Division47th Infantry (Reserve) Division
In March 1939, after the re-emergence of Germany as a significant military power and its occupation of Czechoslovakia, the British Army increased the number of divisions in the Territorial Army (TA) by duplicating existing units.

43rd (Wessex) Infantry Division

43rd (Wessex) DivisionWessex Division43rd (Wessex)
The division was disbanded and again reformed in the Territorial Army (TA) after the war.

61st Infantry Division (United Kingdom)

61st Infantry Division61st Division61st
The 61st Infantry Division was an infantry division of the British Army, raised in 1939 as part of the expansion of the Territorial Army in response to the German occupation of Czechoslovakia.

45th Infantry Division (United Kingdom)

45th Infantry Division2nd Wessex Division45th (Holding) Division
In March 1939, after the re-emergence of Germany as a significant military power and its occupation of Czechoslovakia, the British Army increased the number of divisions in the Territorial Army (TA) by duplicating existing units.

66th Infantry Division (United Kingdom)

66th Infantry Division66th Division
In March 1939, after the re-emergence of Germany as a European power and its occupation of Czechoslovakia, the British Army increased the number of divisions within the Territorial Army by duplicating existing units.

50th (Northumbrian) Infantry Division

50th Division50th (Northumbrian) Division50th Infantry Division
Pre-war, the division was part of the Territorial Army (TA) and the two Ts in the divisional insignia represent the three main rivers of its recruitment area, namely the rivers Tyne, Tees and Humber.

48th (South Midland) Division

48th (South Midland) Infantry Division48th DivisionSouth Midland Division
Reformed in 1920 in the Territorial Army (TA) as the 48th (South Midland) Infantry Division, it saw active service in the Second World War with the British Expeditionary Force (BEF) in Belgium and France before being evacuated from Dunkirk to the United Kingdom.

44th (Home Counties) Division

44th (Home Counties) Infantry DivisionHome Counties Division44th Division
Reformed in the Territorial Army (TA) in 1920 as the 44th (Home Counties) Division, the division saw active service in the Second World War in Belgium, France and North Africa (notably in the Battle of El Alamein) before again being disbanded in 1943.

23rd (Northumbrian) Division

23rd Division23rd (Northumbrian)23rd (Northumbrian) Infantry Division
In March 1939, after the re-emergence of Germany as a European power and its occupation of Czechoslovakia, the British Army increased the number of divisions within the Territorial Army by duplicating existing units.

52nd (Lowland) Infantry Division

52nd (Lowland) Division52nd (Lowland)Lowland Division
The Territorial Force was later reformed as the Territorial Army and the division was again raised, during the inter-war years, as the 52nd (Lowland) Infantry Division - a 1st Line Territorial Army Infantry Division - and went on to serve during the Second World War.

12th (Eastern) Infantry Division

12th (Eastern) Division12th (Eastern)12th Division
In March 1939, after the re-emergence of Germany as a European power and its occupation of Czechoslovakia, the British Army increased the number of divisions within the Territorial Army by duplicating existing units.

9th (Highland) Infantry Division

British 9th (Highland) Infantry Division9th (Highland) Division9th Highland Division
In March 1939, after the re-emergence of Germany as a significant military power and its occupation of Czechoslovakia, the British Army increased the number of divisions in the Territorial Army (TA) by duplicating existing units.

53rd (Welsh) Infantry Division

53rd (Welsh) DivisionWelsh Division53rd (Welsh)
Remaining active in the Territorial Army (TA) during the interwar period as a peacetime formation, the division again saw action in Second World War, fighting in North-western Europe from June 1944 until May 1945.