The Siege of Vicksburg
Map of Meridian Battlefield study area by the American Battlefield Protection Program
Brigadier General Grant and staff, Cairo, October 1861
Maj. Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman, commander of Union forces in the Meridian campaign
Battle of Fort Henry and the movements to Fort Donelson.
Lt. Gen. Leonidas Polk, commander of Confederate forces during the Meridian campaign
Shiloh: Crucible of the Army of the Tennessee
General Henry Wager Halleck
Grant's Operations against Vicksburg
Grant discussing the terms of the capitulation of Vicksburg with defeated Confederate General Pemberton
Major General Sherman, second commander of the Army of the Tennessee
Major General McPherson, third commander of the Army of the Tennessee
Sherman's March to the Sea
Sherman's Carolinas Campaign
General Sherman at war's end with Generals Howard, Logan, Hazen, Davis, Slocum, and Mower; Howard and Logan were the last two commanders of the Army of the Tennessee

The Meridian campaign or Meridian expedition took place from February 3 – March 6, 1864, from Vicksburg, Mississippi to Meridian, Mississippi, by the Union Army of the Tennessee, led by Maj. Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman.

- Meridian campaign

Under other generals, starting with William Tecumseh Sherman, the army marched and fought from the Chattanooga Campaign, through the Relief of Knoxville, the Meridian Campaign, the Atlanta Campaign, the March to the Sea, the Carolinas Campaign, and to the end of the war and disbandment.

- Army of the Tennessee
The Siege of Vicksburg

4 related topics

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Sherman's March to the Sea, Alexander Hay Ritchie

Sherman's March to the Sea

Military campaign of the American Civil War conducted through Georgia from November 15 until December 21, 1864, by William Tecumseh Sherman, major general of the Union Army.

Military campaign of the American Civil War conducted through Georgia from November 15 until December 21, 1864, by William Tecumseh Sherman, major general of the Union Army.

Sherman's March to the Sea, Alexander Hay Ritchie
Savannah campaign (Sherman's March to the Sea): detailed map
Savannah campaign (Sherman's March to the Sea)
Sherman's advance: Tennessee, Georgia, and Carolinas (1863–65)
Sherman's men destroying a railroad in Atlanta
Sherman's March to the Sea was celebrated in music in 1865 with words by S.H.M. Byers and music by J.O. Rockwell.

The campaign was designed by Grant and Sherman to be similar to Grant's innovative and successful Vicksburg campaign and Sherman's Meridian campaign, in that Sherman's armies would reduce their need for traditional supply lines by "living off the land" after consuming their 20 days of rations.

The right wing was the Army of the Tennessee, commanded by Maj. Gen. Oliver O. Howard, consisting of two corps:

Stephen A. Hurlbut

Attorney and politician, who commanded the U.S. Army of the Gulf in the American Civil War.

Attorney and politician, who commanded the U.S. Army of the Gulf in the American Civil War.

General Hurlbut

Hurlbut was present at the Battle of Shiloh and served under General Sherman during the Meridian Expedition.

He commanded the 4th Division, Army of the Tennessee at the Battle of Shiloh, and in the advance towards Corinth and the subsequent siege.

XVI Corps badge

XVI Corps (Union Army)

Corps of the Union Army during the American Civil War.

Corps of the Union Army during the American Civil War.

XVI Corps badge

With the Army of the Tennessee besieging Vicksburg, Maj. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant gathered reinforcements from the surrounding areas.

Maj. Gen. Hurlbut assumed direct command over these divisions known as the Right Wing and participated in the Meridian Expedition in February 1864.

Photograph by Mathew Brady of Sherman at Washington, D.C., in May 1865. The black ribbon of mourning on his left arm is for President Abraham Lincoln.

William Tecumseh Sherman

American soldier, businessman, educator, and author.

American soldier, businessman, educator, and author.

Photograph by Mathew Brady of Sherman at Washington, D.C., in May 1865. The black ribbon of mourning on his left arm is for President Abraham Lincoln.
Sherman's childhood home in Lancaster
Young Sherman in military uniform
California Registered Historic Landmark plaque at the location in Jackson Square, San Francisco, of the branch of the Bank of Lucas, Turner & Co. that Sherman directed from 1853 to 1857
Two cannons on display in front of the Military Science building at Louisiana State University, which were used at the Battle of Fort Sumter and procured by Sherman for the university after the U.S. Civil War.
Portrait by Mathew Brady, c. undefined 1864
Oil portrait of Sherman by George P. A. Healy, 1866
Engraving depicting Admiral Porter's flotilla of gunships and transports arriving below Vicksburg on April 16, 1863. General Sherman is rowing out to the flagship, the USS Benton, in a yawl.
Map of the Battles for Chattanooga, 1863
Map of Sherman's campaigns in Georgia and the Carolinas, 1864–1865
Sherman on horseback at Federal Fort No. 7, after the Atlanta Campaign, September 1864
Green–Meldrim House, which served as Sherman's headquarters after his capture of Savannah in December 1864
The Burning of Columbia, South Carolina (1865) by William Waud for Harper's Weekly
From left to right, Sherman, Grant, Lincoln, and Porter meet on board the River Queen on March 27, 1865, near City Point, Virginia. The 1868 oil painting The Peacemakers by G. P. A. Healy is in the White House collection.
Sherman with Howard, Logan, Hazen, Davis, Slocum, and Mower, photographed by Mathew Brady, May 1865
Portrait by Mathew Brady or Levin C. Handy, between 1865 and 1880
Photograph by G. N. Barnard of Sherman's troops destroying a railroad in Atlanta, 1864
An 1868 engraving by Alexander Hay Ritchie depicting the March to the Sea
Map of Sherman's advance from Atlanta to Goldsboro
Cover of sheet music for a song celebrating the March to the Sea (1865)
Sherman (third from left) and other Indian Peace Commissioners in council with native chiefs and headmen, at the signing of the Treaty of Fort Laramie in 1868
Portrait of Sherman in the frontispiece of the second edition of his Memoirs (1886). The engraving is based on a photograph taken ca. 1885 by Napoleon Sarony.
Shoulder strap insignia, introduced by Sherman in 1872 for his use as General of the Army
Sherman in his later years, in civilian evening clothes
Sherman's death mask
William Tecumseh Sherman monument by Augustus Saint-Gaudens, 1902, located at Grand Army Plaza in Manhattan, New York, incorporates a statue of Nike titled Victory

Grant, the previous commander of the District of Cairo, had just won a major victory at Fort Henry and been given command of the ill-defined District of West Tennessee.

In February 1864, he led an expedition to Meridian, Mississippi, intended to disrupt Confederate infrastructure and communications.