Art Deco

art-decoArt DécoArt Deco architectureModerneArt Deco styleDecoArt Deco architectural styleNeo Art DecoArt Deco buildingsArt Deco-style
Art Deco, sometimes referred to as Deco, is a style of visual arts, architecture and design that first appeared in France just before World War I. Art Deco influenced the design of buildings, furniture, jewelry, fashion, cars, movie theatres, trains, ocean liners, and everyday objects such as radios and vacuum cleaners.wikipedia
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Chrysler Building

Chrysler405 Lexington AvenueChrysler Building, Ground Floor Interior
The Chrysler Building and other skyscrapers of New York built during the 1920s and 1930s are monuments of the Art Deco style.
The Chrysler Building is an Art Deco–style skyscraper located in the Turtle Bay neighborhood on the East Side of Manhattan, New York City, near Midtown Manhattan, at the intersection of 42nd Street and Lexington Avenue.

Art Deco architecture of New York City

Art DecoArt Deco architectureother skyscrapers of New York built during the 1920s and 1930s
The Chrysler Building and other skyscrapers of New York built during the 1920s and 1930s are monuments of the Art Deco style.
Art Deco architecture flourished in New York City during the 1920s and 1930s before largely disappearing after World War II.

Streamline Moderne

Art ModerneModerneStreamline
A sleeker form of the style, called Streamline Moderne, appeared in the 1930s; it featured curving forms and smooth, polished surfaces.
Streamline Moderne is an international style of Art Deco architecture and design that emerged in the 1930s.

École nationale supérieure des arts décoratifs

École des Arts DécoratifsEcole des Arts DécoratifsENSAD
In response to this, the École royale gratuite de dessin (Royal Free School of Design), founded in 1766 under King Louis XVI to train artists and artisans in crafts relating to the fine arts, was renamed the École nationale des arts décoratifs (National School of Decorative Arts).
The École Nationale Supérieure des Arts Décoratifs played a major role in the development of the Art Deco design movement in the 1920s and in the creation of new design concepts.

Bevis Hillier

Hillier, Bevis
Art Deco gained currency as a broadly applied stylistic label in 1968 when historian Bevis Hillier published the first major academic book on the style: Art Deco of the 20s and 30s.
He has written on Art Deco, and also a biography of Sir John Betjeman.

International Exhibition of Modern Decorative and Industrial Arts

Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels ModernesInternational Exposition of Modern Industrial and Decorative ArtsExposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs
It took its name, short for Arts Décoratifs, from the Exposition internationale des arts décoratifs et industriels modernes (International Exhibition of Modern Decorative and Industrial Arts) held in Paris in 1925.
The Style Moderne presented at the Exposition later became known as "Art Deco", after the name of the Exposition.

Le Corbusier

CorbusierCharles-Edouard JeanneretCorbusian
During the 1925 Exposition, architect Le Corbusier wrote a series of articles about the exhibition for his magazine L'Esprit Nouveau, under the title "1925 EXPO. ARTS. DÉCO.", which were combined into a book, L'art décoratif d'aujourd'hui (Decorative Art Today).
He traveled to Paris, and during fourteen months between 1908 until 1910 he worked as a draftsman in the office of the architect Auguste Perret, the pioneer of the use of reinforced concrete in residential construction and the architect of the Art Deco landmark Théâtre des Champs-Élysées.

Louis Süe

Louis SueSüe
The styles ranged from the updated versions of Louis XIV, Louis XVI, and especially Louis Philippe furniture made by Louis Süe and the Primavera workshop, to more modern forms from the workshop of the Au Louvre department store. This became the model for the Compagnie des arts français, created in 1919, which brought together André Mare, and Louis Süe, the first leading French Art Deco designers and decorators.
He and André Mare co-founded the Compagnie des arts français, which produced Art Deco furniture and interior decorations for wealthy customers.

Émile-Jacques Ruhlmann

Jacques-Emile RuhlmannJacques-Émile RuhlmannEmile-Jacques Ruhlmann
Other designers, including Émile-Jacques Ruhlmann and Paul Foliot refused to use mass production, and insisted that each piece be made individually by hand.
Émile-Jacques Ruhlmann (28 August 1879 – 15 November 1933), (sometimes called Jacques-Émile Ruhlmann), was a French furniture designer and interior decorator, who was one of the most important figures in the Art Deco movement.

André Mare

MareAndré Mar
This became the model for the Compagnie des arts français, created in 1919, which brought together André Mare, and Louis Süe, the first leading French Art Deco designers and decorators.
He was a designer of colorful textiles, and was one of the founders of the Art Deco movement.

Henri Sauvage

Henry Sauvage
Henri Sauvage, another important future Art Deco architect, built another in 1904 at 7, rue Trétaigne (1904).
He was one of the most important architects in the French Art nouveau movement, Art Deco, and the beginning of architectural modernism.

Auguste Perret

August PerretPerretAuguste
In 1893 August Perret built the first concrete garage in Paris, then an apartment building, house, then, in 1913, the Théâtre des Champs-Élysées.
His major works include the Théatre des Champs-Élysées, the first Art Deco building in Paris; the Church of Notre-Dame du Raincy (1922–23); the Mobilier Nationale in Paris (1937); and the French Economic, Social and Environmental Council building in Paris (1937–39).

Antoine Bourdelle

BourdelleEmile-Antoine BourdelleEmile Antoine Bourdelle
The decor of the theater was also revolutionary; the facade was decorated with high reliefs by Antoine Bourdelle, a dome by Maurice Denis, paintings by Édouard Vuillard, and an Art Deco curtain by Ker-Xavier Roussel.
He was a student of Auguste Rodin, a teacher of Giacometti and Henri Matisse, and an important figure in the Art Deco movement and the transition from the Beaux-Arts style to modern sculpture.

Société des artistes décorateurs

Salon des Artistes DécorateursSociété des Artistes-DécorateursArtistes Decorateurs
Many colorful works, including chairs and a table by Maurice Dufrene and a bright Gobelin carpet by Paul Follot were presented at the 1912 Salon des artistes décorateurs.
Some historians trace Art Deco's roots to the Universal Exposition of 1900.

International Style (architecture)

International StyleInternationalInternational-style
Art Deco is one of the first truly international styles, but its dominance ended with the beginning of World War II and the rise of the strictly functional and unadorned styles of modern architecture and the International Style of architecture that followed.
The exhibition excluded other contemporary styles that were exploring the boundaries of architecture at the time, including: Art Deco, German Expressionism, for instance the works of Hermann Finsterlin, and the Organicist movement, popularized in the work of Antoni Gaudí.

Minneapolis Institute of Art

Minneapolis Institute of ArtsThe Minneapolis Institute of ArtsMinneapolis Society of Fine Arts
In 1971, Hillier organized an exhibition at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts, which he details in his book about it, The World of Art Deco.
The art historian Bevis Hillier organized the exhibition Art Deco at the museum, presented from July to September 1971, which caused a resurgence of interest in this style of art.

André Vera

In the 1912 writings of André Vera.
André Vera (1881–1971) was a French garden designer, town planner and pioneer of the Art Deco style.

Paul Follot

Paul FolloPaul Follow,
Many colorful works, including chairs and a table by Maurice Dufrene and a bright Gobelin carpet by Paul Follot were presented at the 1912 Salon des artistes décorateurs.
He was one of the leaders of the Art Deco movement, and had huge influence in France and elsewhere.

Art Nouveau

JugendstilArt-NouveauArt Nouveau style
Le Nouveau style, published in the journal L'Art décoratif, he expressed the rejection of Art Nouveau forms (asymmetric, polychrome and picturesque) and called for simplicité volontaire, symétrie manifeste, l'ordre et l'harmonie, themes that would eventually become common within Art Deco; though the Deco style was often extremely colorful and anything but simple.
It was replaced as the dominant European architectural and decorative style first by Art Deco and then by Modernism.

Joseph Csaky

CsakyJosef CsàkyJoseph Csaky (József Csáky)
In 1927, Cubists Joseph Csaky, Jacques Lipchitz, Louis Marcoussis, Henri Laurens, the sculptor Gustave Miklos, and others collaborated in the decoration of a Studio House, rue Saint-James, Neuilly-sur-Seine, designed by the architect Paul Ruaud and owned by the French fashion designer Jacques Doucet, also a collector of Post-Impressionist art by Henri Matisse and Cubist paintings (including Les Demoiselles d'Avignon, which he bought directly from Picasso's studio).
He was an active member of the Section d'Or group between 1911 and 1914, and closely associated with Crystal Cubism, Purism, De Stijl, Abstract art, and Art Deco throughout the 1920s and 1930s.

Gustave Miklos

In 1927, Cubists Joseph Csaky, Jacques Lipchitz, Louis Marcoussis, Henri Laurens, the sculptor Gustave Miklos, and others collaborated in the decoration of a Studio House, rue Saint-James, Neuilly-sur-Seine, designed by the architect Paul Ruaud and owned by the French fashion designer Jacques Doucet, also a collector of Post-Impressionist art by Henri Matisse and Cubist paintings (including Les Demoiselles d'Avignon, which he bought directly from Picasso's studio).
An influential sculptor involved with Cubism and early developments in Art Deco, Miklos exhibited at the Salon d'Automne and the Salon des Indépendants during the 1910s and 1920s, and in 1925 showed at the International Exposition of Modern Industrial and Decorative Arts; the exhibition from which the term "Art Deco" was derived.

Wiener Werkstätte

Wiener WerkstatteWiener WerkstaetteWiener Keramik
Hoffmann was also a founder of the Wiener Werkstätte (1903–1932), an association of craftsmen and interior designers working in the new style.
It is regarded as a pioneer of modern design, and its influence can be seen in later styles such as Bauhaus and Art Deco.

Relief

bas-reliefbas reliefbas-reliefs
The decor of the theater was also revolutionary; the facade was decorated with high reliefs by Antoine Bourdelle, a dome by Maurice Denis, paintings by Édouard Vuillard, and an Art Deco curtain by Ker-Xavier Roussel.
Large architectural compositions all in low relief saw a revival in the 20th century, being popular on buildings in Art Deco and related styles, which borrowed from the ancient low reliefs now available in museums.

Turin

TorinoTurin, ItalyTorino, Italy
The first international exhibition devoted entirely to the decorative arts, the Esposizione international d'Arte decorative moderna, was held in Turin in 1902.
The district features many buildings in Art Nouveau, Art Deco and Neo-Gothic style.

Théâtre des Champs-Élysées

Théâtre des Champs-ElyséesComédie des Champs-ÉlyséesThéâtre des Champs Elysées
In 1893 August Perret built the first concrete garage in Paris, then an apartment building, house, then, in 1913, the Théâtre des Champs-Élysées.
Commissionned by impresario Gabriel Astruc, the theatre was built from 1911 to 1913 upon the designs of brothers Auguste Perret and Gustave Perret following a scheme by Henry van de Velde, and became the first example of Art Deco architecture in the city.