Artery

arteriesarterialarterial systemarterial wallartery wallsarterial bloodarterial supplyarterial systemsarterial vasculaturearterial vessel
An artery (plural arteries) is a blood vessel that takes blood away from the heart to all parts of the body (tissues, lungs, etc).wikipedia
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Blood vessel

vascularblood vesselsintravascular
An artery (plural arteries) is a blood vessel that takes blood away from the heart to all parts of the body (tissues, lungs, etc).
There are three major types of blood vessels: the arteries, which carry the blood away from the heart; the capillaries, which enable the actual exchange of water and chemicals between the blood and the tissues; and the veins, which carry blood from the capillaries back toward the heart.

Blood

human bloodhematologicalblood-forming
An artery (plural arteries) is a blood vessel that takes blood away from the heart to all parts of the body (tissues, lungs, etc). Systemic arteries are the arteries (including the peripheral arteries), of the systemic circulation, which is the part of the cardiovascular system that carries oxygenated blood away from the heart, to the body, and returns deoxygenated blood back to the heart.
In animals with lungs, arterial blood carries oxygen from inhaled air to the tissues of the body, and venous blood carries carbon dioxide, a waste product of metabolism produced by cells, from the tissues to the lungs to be exhaled.

Pulmonary artery

pulmonary arteriespulmonary trunkpulmonary
Most arteries carry oxygenated blood; the two exceptions are the pulmonary and the umbilical arteries, which carry deoxygenated blood to the organs that oxygenate it. The effective arterial blood volume is that extracellular fluid which fills the arterial system. The arterial system of the human body is divided into systemic arteries, carrying blood from the heart to the whole body, and pulmonary arteries, carrying deoxygenated blood from the heart to the lungs.
A pulmonary artery is an artery in the pulmonary circulation that carries deoxygenated blood from the right side of the heart to the lungs.

Circulatory system

cardiovascularcirculationcardiovascular system
The arteries are part of the circulatory system, which is responsible for the delivery of oxygen and nutrients to all cells, as well as the removal of carbon dioxide and waste products, the maintenance of optimum blood pH, and the circulation of proteins and cells of the immune system. The arterial system of the human body is divided into systemic arteries, carrying blood from the heart to the whole body, and pulmonary arteries, carrying deoxygenated blood from the heart to the lungs. Systemic arteries are the arteries (including the peripheral arteries), of the systemic circulation, which is the part of the cardiovascular system that carries oxygenated blood away from the heart, to the body, and returns deoxygenated blood back to the heart.
While humans, as well as other vertebrates, have a closed cardiovascular system (meaning that the blood never leaves the network of arteries, veins and capillaries), some invertebrate groups have an open cardiovascular system.

Elastic fiber

elastic tissueelastic fiberselastic
The outermost layer of an artery (or vein) is known as the tunica externa, also known as tunica adventitia, and is composed of collagen fibers and elastic tissue - with the largest arteries containing vasa vasorum (small blood vessels that supply large blood vessels). Inside this layer is the tunica media, or media, which is made up of smooth muscle cells, elastic tissue (also called connective tissue proper) and collagen fibres.
Elastic fibers (or yellow fibers) are bundles of proteins (elastin) found in extracellular matrix of connective tissue and produced by fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells in arteries.

Tunica intima

intimaintimalinner layer
The innermost layer, which is in direct contact with the flow of blood, is the tunica intima, commonly called the intima.
The tunica intima (New Latin "inner coat"), or intima for short, is the innermost tunica (layer) of an artery or vein.

Heart

cardiachuman heartapex of the heart
The arterial system of the human body is divided into systemic arteries, carrying blood from the heart to the whole body, and pulmonary arteries, carrying deoxygenated blood from the heart to the lungs.
This is achieved by the coronary circulation, which includes arteries, veins, and lymphatic vessels.

Tunica media

mediamedia wallmedial
Inside this layer is the tunica media, or media, which is made up of smooth muscle cells, elastic tissue (also called connective tissue proper) and collagen fibres.
The tunica media (New Latin "middle coat"), or media for short, is the middle tunica (layer) of an artery or vein.

Human body

bodyhuman anatomyhuman physiology
The arterial system of the human body is divided into systemic arteries, carrying blood from the heart to the whole body, and pulmonary arteries, carrying deoxygenated blood from the heart to the lungs. Systemic arteries are the arteries (including the peripheral arteries), of the systemic circulation, which is the part of the cardiovascular system that carries oxygenated blood away from the heart, to the body, and returns deoxygenated blood back to the heart.
The circulatory system comprises the heart and blood vessels (arteries, veins and capillaries).

Vein

veinsvenousvenous system
Arteries carry oxygenated blood away from the heart to the tissues, except for pulmonary arteries, which carry blood to the lungs for oxygenation (usually veins carry deoxygenated blood to the heart but the pulmonary veins carry oxygenated blood as well).
In contrast to veins, arteries carry blood away from the heart.

Blood pressure

systolic blood pressurediastolic blood pressurearterial blood pressure
Arteries have a blood pressure higher than other parts of the circulatory system.
Used without further specification, "blood pressure" usually refers to the pressure in large arteries of the systemic circulation.

Pulse

pulse ratepulsationheartbeat
The variation in pressure produces a pulse, which can be felt in different areas of the body, such as the radial pulse.
In medicine, a pulse represents the tactile arterial palpation of the heartbeat by trained fingertips.

Myocardial infarction

heart attackheart attacksacute myocardial infarction
In developed countries, the two leading causes of death, myocardial infarction (heart attack), and stroke, may each directly result from an arterial system that has been slowly and progressively compromised by years of deterioration (usually clogged by cholesterol).
The most common cause of a myocardial infarction is the rupture of an atherosclerotic plaque on an artery supplying heart muscle.

Oxygen

OO 2 molecular oxygen
The arteries are part of the circulatory system, which is responsible for the delivery of oxygen and nutrients to all cells, as well as the removal of carbon dioxide and waste products, the maintenance of optimum blood pH, and the circulation of proteins and cells of the immune system. Systemic arteries are the arteries (including the peripheral arteries), of the systemic circulation, which is the part of the cardiovascular system that carries oxygenated blood away from the heart, to the body, and returns deoxygenated blood back to the heart.
The free oxygen partial pressure in the body of a living vertebrate organism is highest in the respiratory system, and decreases along any arterial system, peripheral tissues, and venous system, respectively.

Radial artery

radialradial arteriesradial pulse
The variation in pressure produces a pulse, which can be felt in different areas of the body, such as the radial pulse.
In human anatomy, the radial artery is the main artery of the lateral aspect of the forearm.

Vasa vasorum

blood vessels supplying the artery itselfsmall blood vesselsvasa-vasorum
The outermost layer of an artery (or vein) is known as the tunica externa, also known as tunica adventitia, and is composed of collagen fibers and elastic tissue - with the largest arteries containing vasa vasorum (small blood vessels that supply large blood vessels).
In the human descending aorta, vasa vasorum cease to supply the arterial tunica media with oxygenated blood at the level of the renal arteries. Thus, below this point, the aorta is dependent on diffusion for its metabolic needs, and is necessarily markedly thinner. This leads to an increased likelihood of aortic aneurysm at this location, especially in the presence of atherosclerotic plaques. Other species, such as dogs, do have vasa vasorum below their renal vasculature, and aneurysms at this site are substantially less likely. Cerebral blood vessels are devoid of vasa vasorum; however, these vessels have rete vasorum, which have similar function to vasa vasorum.

Aorta

aorticaortic archaortic root
After travelling from the aorta, blood travels through peripheral arteries into smaller arteries called arterioles, and eventually to capillaries.
The aorta is the main artery in the human body, originating from the left ventricle of the heart and extending down to the abdomen, where it splits into two smaller arteries (the common iliac arteries).

Lung

lungspulmonaryright lung
The arterial system of the human body is divided into systemic arteries, carrying blood from the heart to the whole body, and pulmonary arteries, carrying deoxygenated blood from the heart to the lungs. Arteries carry oxygenated blood away from the heart to the tissues, except for pulmonary arteries, which carry blood to the lungs for oxygenation (usually veins carry deoxygenated blood to the heart but the pulmonary veins carry oxygenated blood as well).
Each bronchopulmonary segment has its own (segmental) bronchus and arterial supply.

Arteriole

arteriolesarteriolararterial
After travelling from the aorta, blood travels through peripheral arteries into smaller arteries called arterioles, and eventually to capillaries. Arterioles have the greatest collective influence on both local blood flow and on overall blood pressure.
An arteriole is a small-diameter blood vessel in the microcirculation that extends and branches out from an artery and leads to capillaries.

Peripheral vascular system

peripheral veinperipheral arteriesPeripheral Vessels
Systemic arteries are the arteries (including the peripheral arteries), of the systemic circulation, which is the part of the cardiovascular system that carries oxygenated blood away from the heart, to the body, and returns deoxygenated blood back to the heart.
The peripheral vascular system consists of the veins and arteries not in the chest or abdomen (i.e. in the arms, hands, legs and feet).

Lumen (anatomy)

lumenluminallumina
The hollow internal cavity in which the blood flows is called the lumen.
The interior of a vessel, such as the central space in an artery or vein through which blood flows.

Smooth muscle

smooth muscle cellssmooth musclessmooth muscle cell
Inside this layer is the tunica media, or media, which is made up of smooth muscle cells, elastic tissue (also called connective tissue proper) and collagen fibres.
Smooth muscle cells are found in the walls of hollow organs, including the stomach, intestines, urinary bladder and uterus, and in the walls of passageways, such as the arteries and veins of the circulatory system, and the tracts of the respiratory, urinary, and reproductive systems.

Common carotid artery

carotidcarotid arteriescarotid artery
These are followed by the branches off the aortic arch, namely the brachiocephalic artery, the left common carotid, and the left subclavian arteries.
In anatomy, the left and right common carotid arteries (carotids) are arteries that supply the head and neck with oxygenated blood; they divide in the neck to form the external and internal carotid arteries.

Brachiocephalic artery

brachiocephalic trunkinnominate arterybrachiocephalic
These are followed by the branches off the aortic arch, namely the brachiocephalic artery, the left common carotid, and the left subclavian arteries.
The brachiocephalic artery (or brachiocephalic trunk or innominate artery) is an artery of the mediastinum that supplies blood to the right arm and the head and neck.

Subclavian artery

subclavian arteriesleft subclavian arterysubclavian
These are followed by the branches off the aortic arch, namely the brachiocephalic artery, the left common carotid, and the left subclavian arteries.
In human anatomy, the subclavian arteries are paired major arteries of the upper thorax, below the clavicle.