Arthur Penn

Mr. PennPenn
Arthur Hiller Penn (September 27, 1922 – September 28, 2010) was an American director and producer of film, television and theater.wikipedia
335 Related Articles

Bonnie and Clyde (film)

Bonnie and ClydeBonnie & ClydeBonnie and Clyde'' (film)
Penn directed critically acclaimed films throughout the 1960s such as the drama The Chase (1966), the biographical crime film Bonnie and Clyde (1967) and the comedy Alice's Restaurant (1969).
Bonnie and Clyde is a 1967 American biographical crime film directed by Arthur Penn and starring Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway as the title characters Clyde Barrow and Bonnie Parker.

Alice's Restaurant (film)

Alice's RestaurantAlice's Restaurant Soundtrackfilm adaptation of ''Alice's Restaurant
Penn directed critically acclaimed films throughout the 1960s such as the drama The Chase (1966), the biographical crime film Bonnie and Clyde (1967) and the comedy Alice's Restaurant (1969).
Alice's Restaurant is a 1969 American comedy film directed by Arthur Penn.

Little Big Man (film)

Little Big ManLittle Big Man'' (film)a popular film
He also got attention for his revisionist Western Little Big Man (1970).
Little Big Man is a 1970 American western film directed by Arthur Penn and based on the novel Little Big Man by Thomas Berger.

The Chase (1966 film)

The Chase19661966 film of the same name
Penn directed critically acclaimed films throughout the 1960s such as the drama The Chase (1966), the biographical crime film Bonnie and Clyde (1967) and the comedy Alice's Restaurant (1969). Penn's next film was The Chase (1966) a thriller following events in a small corrupt Southern town on the day an escaped convict, played by Robert Redford, returns.
The Chase is a 1966 American Technicolor drama film in Panavision directed by Arthur Penn and starring Marlon Brando, Jane Fonda, and Robert Redford, about a series of events set into motion by a prison break.

The Left Handed Gun

After making a name for himself as a director of quality television dramas, Penn made his feature debut with a western, The Left Handed Gun (1958) for Warner Brothers.
The Left Handed Gun is a 1958 American western film and the film directorial debut of Arthur Penn, starring Paul Newman as Billy the Kid and John Dehner as Pat Garrett.

Irving Penn

He was the younger brother of Irving Penn, the successful fashion photographer.
Penn's younger brother, Arthur Penn, was born in 1922 and would go on to become a film director and producer.

The Train (1965 film)

The TrainThe Train'' (1964 film) The Train
Penn began working on The Train in France in June and August 1963 when star Burt Lancaster had Penn fired after three days of Penn's filming and called on John Frankenheimer to take over the film.
Arthur Penn was The Train original director, but was replaced by Frankenheimer three days after filming had begun.

Anne Bancroft

It garnered two Academy Awards for its leads Anne Bancroft and Patty Duke.
In 1958, Bancroft made her Broadway debut as lovelorn, Bronx-accented Gittel Mosca opposite Henry Fonda (as the married man Gittel loves) in William Gibson's two-character play Two for the Seesaw, directed by Arthur Penn.

Mickey One

In 1965 Penn directed Mickey One.
Mickey One is a 1965 American crime drama film starring Warren Beatty and directed by Arthur Penn from a script by Alan Surgal.

Warren Beatty

BeattyMr. Beatty
Heavily influenced by the French New Wave, it was the dreamlike story of a standup comedian (played by Warren Beatty) on the run from sinister, ambiguous forces.
Director and collaborator Arthur Penn described Beatty as "the perfect producer", adding, "He makes everyone demand the best of themselves. Warren stays with a picture through editing, mixing and scoring. He plain works harder than anyone else I have ever seen."

Wait Until Dark

Also that year, he directed the stage version of the thriller Wait Until Dark starring Lee Remick and Robert Duvall.
Produced by Fred Coe and directed by Arthur Penn, the Broadway premiere of Wait Until Dark opened on February 2, 1966, at the Ethel Barrymore Theatre.

William Gibson (playwright)

William GibsonVilliam GibsonW. Gibson
Penn had won a Tony Award for directing the stage production, written by William Gibson, also starring Bancroft and Duke, and he had directed Bancroft's Broadway debut in playwright Gibson's first Broadway production, Two for the Seesaw.
It was directed by Arthur Penn.

John Frankenheimer

Frankenheimer John FrankenheimerJohn Frankenheimer Productions
Penn began working on The Train in France in June and August 1963 when star Burt Lancaster had Penn fired after three days of Penn's filming and called on John Frankenheimer to take over the film.
The Train (1964) had already begun shooting in France when star Lancaster had Arthur Penn the original director fired and called in Frankenheimer to save the film.

Burt Lancaster

Hecht-Lancaster
Penn began working on The Train in France in June and August 1963 when star Burt Lancaster had Penn fired after three days of Penn's filming and called on John Frankenheimer to take over the film.
He had a small role in The List of Adrian Messenger (1963) for producer/star Kirk Douglas, and then did two for Frankenheimer: Seven Days in May (1964), a political thriller with Douglas, and The Train (1964), a World War Two action film (Lancaster had Frankenheimer replace Arthur Penn several days into filming).

Night Moves (1975 film)

Night Moves1975Night Moves'' (1975 film)
His next film was a paranoid thriller set in Los Angeles, Night Moves (1975) about a private detective (played by Gene Hackman) on the trail of a runaway.
Night Moves is a 1975 American neo-noir film directed by Arthur Penn.

Robert Redford

RedfordJeremiah Johnsonthe actor
Penn's next film was The Chase (1966) a thriller following events in a small corrupt Southern town on the day an escaped convict, played by Robert Redford, returns.
The same year saw his first teaming (on equal footing) with Jane Fonda, in Arthur Penn's The Chase.

Four Friends (1981 film)

Four FriendsFour Friends'' (1981 film)
In the 1980s, Penn's career began to lose its momentum with critics and audiences: Four Friends (1981) was a traumatic look back at the 1960s, returning to the old themes of Vietnam, civil rights, sexual politics, and drugs.
Four Friends is a 1981 American comedy-drama film directed by Arthur Penn.

The Missouri Breaks

Next came a comic western, The Missouri Breaks (1976), a ramshackle, eccentric story of a horse thief (Jack Nicholson) facing off with an eccentric bounty hunter (played by Marlon Brando).
The film was directed by Arthur Penn, with supporting performances by Randy Quaid, Harry Dean Stanton, Frederic Forrest, John McLiam and Kathleen Lloyd.

Badlands (film)

BadlandsBadlands'' (film)
Indeed, there was a strong resurgence in the "love on the run" subgenre in the wake of Bonnie and Clyde, peaking with Badlands (1973; in which Penn received acknowledgement in the credits).
Malick, a protégé of Arthur Penn's (whom he thanked in the film's end credits), began work on Badlands after his second year attending the American Film Institute.

Arlo Guthrie

ArloJackie Guthrie
He contacted Arlo Guthrie and not only received permission to adapt his song "Alice's Restaurant Massacree" into a film, but also secured Guthrie's participation as well as several other Stockbridge town residents while also filming in many of the same locations where the events took place.
A 1969 film, directed and co-written by Arthur Penn, was based on the true story told in the song, but with the addition of a large number of fictional scenes.

Dead of Winter

Next came Target (1985), a mainstream thriller reuniting the director with Gene Hackman, and Dead of Winter (1987), a horror/thriller in the style of Alfred Hitchcock, which he took over directing during production.
Dead of Winter is a 1987 American horror thriller film, directed by Arthur Penn and starring Mary Steenburgen, who plays three roles.

Target (1985 film)

TargetTarget'' (1985 film)
Next came Target (1985), a mainstream thriller reuniting the director with Gene Hackman, and Dead of Winter (1987), a horror/thriller in the style of Alfred Hitchcock, which he took over directing during production.
Target is a 1985 American mystery thriller film directed by Arthur Penn and starring Matt Dillon and Gene Hackman.

Visions of Eight

In 1973 Penn provided a segment for a promotional film for the Olympics, Visions of Eight along with several other major directors such as John Schlesinger and Miloš Forman.
Arthur Penn directed The Highest

The Miracle Worker (1962 film)

The Miracle Worker1962The Miracle Worker'' (1962 film)
The Miracle Worker (1962)
The Miracle Worker is a 1962 American biographical film about Anne Sullivan, blind tutor to Helen Keller, directed by Arthur Penn.

Flesh and Blood (1968 film)

Flesh and BloodFlesh and Blood'' (1968 film)
Flesh and Blood – Television film (1968)
Flesh and Blood is a 1968 television film directed by Arthur Penn from an original teleplay by William Hanley.