Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington

Duke of WellingtonWellingtonArthur WellesleyThe Duke of WellingtonSir Arthur Wellesley1st Duke of WellingtonLord WellingtonWellesleyArthur Wellesley, Marquess of WellingtonMarquess of Wellington
Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, (1 May 1769 – 14 September 1852) was an Anglo-Irish soldier and Tory statesman who was one of the leading military and political figures of 19th-century Britain, serving twice as Prime Minister.wikipedia
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Battle of Waterloo

Waterloobattlethe Battle of Waterloo
His victory against Napoleon at the Battle of Waterloo in 1815 puts him in the first rank of Britain's military heroes.
A French army under the command of Napoleon Bonaparte was defeated by two of the armies of the Seventh Coalition: a British-led allied army under the command of the Duke of Wellington, and a Prussian army under the command of Field Marshal Blücher.

Military career of Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington

battle record
Wellington's battle record is exemplary; he ultimately participated in some 60 battles during the course of his military career.
Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, (1 May 1769 – 14 September 1852), was one of the leading British military and political figures of the 19th century.

Battle of Assaye

AssayeAssaye 1803
He was appointed governor of Seringapatam and Mysore in 1799 and, as a newly appointed major-general, won a decisive victory over the Maratha Confederacy at the Battle of Assaye in 1803.
It occurred on 23 September 1803 near Assaye in western India where an outnumbered Indian and British force under the command of Major General Arthur Wellesley (who later became the Duke of Wellington) defeated a combined Maratha army of Daulat Scindia and the Raja of Berar.

Peninsular War

PeninsulaWar of IndependenceSpain
Wellesley rose to prominence as a general during the Peninsular campaign of the Napoleonic Wars, and was promoted to the rank of field marshal after leading the allied forces to victory against the French Empire at the Battle of Vitoria in 1813.
The British Army, under then Lt. Gen. Sir Arthur Wellesley, later the 1st Duke of Wellington, guarded Portugal and campaigned against the French in Spain alongside the reformed Portuguese army.

United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland

United KingdomBritishUK
Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, (1 May 1769 – 14 September 1852) was an Anglo-Irish soldier and Tory statesman who was one of the leading military and political figures of 19th-century Britain, serving twice as Prime Minister.
The Duke of Wellington gradually pushed the French out of Spain, and in early 1814, as Napoleon was being driven back in the east by the Prussians, Austrians and Russians, Wellington invaded southern France.

Battle of Vitoria

VittoriaVitoriabattle of Vittoria
Wellesley rose to prominence as a general during the Peninsular campaign of the Napoleonic Wars, and was promoted to the rank of field marshal after leading the allied forces to victory against the French Empire at the Battle of Vitoria in 1813.
At the Battle of Vitoria (21 June 1813) a British, Portuguese and Spanish army under General the Marquess of Wellington broke the French army under Joseph Bonaparte and Marshal Jean-Baptiste Jourdan near Vitoria in Spain, eventually leading to victory in the Peninsular War.

Tories (British political party)

ToryToriesTory Party
Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, (1 May 1769 – 14 September 1852) was an Anglo-Irish soldier and Tory statesman who was one of the leading military and political figures of 19th-century Britain, serving twice as Prime Minister.
The Earl of Liverpool was succeeded by fellow Tory Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, whose term included the Catholic Emancipation, which occurred mostly due to the election of Daniel O'Connell as a Catholic MP from Ireland.

British Army

ArmyBritishBritish troops
He was commissioned as an ensign in the British Army in 1787, serving in Ireland as aide-de-camp to two successive Lords Lieutenant of Ireland.
A coalition of Anglo-Dutch and Prussian armies under the Duke of Wellington and Field Marshal von Blücher finally defeated Napoleon at Waterloo in 1815.

Gebhard Leberecht von Blücher

BlücherGebhard von BlücherPrince Blücher
During the Hundred Days in 1815, he commanded the allied army which, together with a Prussian army under Blücher, defeated Napoleon at Waterloo.
After Napoleon’s return in 1815, Blücher took command of the Prussian Army of the Lower Rhine and coordinated his force with that of the British and Allied forces under the Duke of Wellington.

Richard Wellesley, 1st Marquess Wellesley

Lord WellesleyRichard WellesleyThe Marquess Wellesley
In 1781, Arthur's father died and his eldest brother Richard inherited his father's earldom.
His younger brother, Arthur, was Field Marshal The 1st Duke of Wellington.

Field marshal (United Kingdom)

Field MarshalBritish Field MarshalField Marshals
Wellesley rose to prominence as a general during the Peninsular campaign of the Napoleonic Wars, and was promoted to the rank of field marshal after leading the allied forces to victory against the French Empire at the Battle of Vitoria in 1813.
Fifteen future field marshals were present at the Battle of Vitoria, where the Duke of Wellington earned the rank, and ten others served under Wellington at the Battle of Waterloo.

Duke of Wellington's Regiment

33rd Regiment of Foot33rd Foot33rd
He became a major by purchase in the 33rd Regiment in 1793.
The first Duke of Wellington died in 1852 and in the following year Queen Victoria, in recognition of the regiment's long ties to him, ordered that the regiment's title be changed to the 33rd (or The Duke of Wellington's) Regiment. In 1881, following the Childers Reforms, the 33rd was linked with the 76th Regiment of Foot, who shared their depot in Halifax.

Eton College

EtonEtonianOld Etonian
He then enrolled at Eton College, where he studied from 1781 to 1784.
The Duke of Wellington is often incorrectly quoted as saying that "The Battle of Waterloo was won on the playing-fields of Eton".

Roman Catholic Relief Act 1829

Catholic Relief ActRoman Catholic Relief ActCatholic Emancipation
He oversaw the passage of the Catholic Relief Act 1829, but opposed the Reform Act 1832.
The British leaders, starting with the Prime Minister the Duke of Wellington and his top aide Robert Peel, although personally opposed, gave in to avoid civil strife.

12th Royal Lancers

12th Lancers12th Light Dragoons12th (Prince of Wales's Royal) Lancers
On 23 January 1788, he transferred into the 41st Regiment of Foot, then again on 25 June 1789, still a lieutenant, he transferred to the 12th (Prince of Wales's) Regiment of (Light) Dragoons and, according to military historian Richard Holmes, he also dipped a reluctant toe into politics.
In 1751, the regiment was officially styled the 12th Dragoons. In 1768, King George III bestowed the badge of the three ostrich feathers and the motto "Ich Dien" on the regiment and re-titled it as The 12th (Prince of Wales's) Regiment of (Light) Dragoons. A young Arthur Wellesley joined the regiment as a subaltern in 1789.

41st (Welch) Regiment of Foot

41st Regiment of Foot41st Foot41st (Welsh) Regiment of Foot
On 23 January 1788, he transferred into the 41st Regiment of Foot, then again on 25 June 1789, still a lieutenant, he transferred to the 12th (Prince of Wales's) Regiment of (Light) Dragoons and, according to military historian Richard Holmes, he also dipped a reluctant toe into politics.
On 23 January 1788, Arthur Wellesley, the future Duke of Wellington, joined the regiment as a young lieutenant.

18th Royal Hussars

18th Hussars18th Light Dragoons18th (Queen Mary's Own) Hussars
On 31 October, he transferred to the 18th Light Dragoons and it was during this period that he grew increasingly attracted to Kitty Pakenham, the daughter of Edward Pakenham, 2nd Baron Longford.
Arthur Wesley was briefly a junior officer in the regiment between October 1792 and April 1793.

Trim, County Meath

TrimAth TruimTrim
He spent most of his childhood at his family's two homes, the first a large house in Dublin and the second Dangan Castle, 3 mi north of Summerhill on the Trim Road (now the R158) in County Meath.
Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington is reputed to have been born in Dangan Castle between Trim and Summerhill, and a large column to him was erected in the town in 1817.

Rotten and pocket boroughs

rotten boroughpocket boroughrotten boroughs
Shortly before the general election of 1789, he went to the rotten borough of Trim to speak against the granting of the title "Freeman" of Dublin to the parliamentary leader of the Irish Patriot Party, Henry Grattan.
Before being awarded a peerage, Arthur Wellesley, later Duke of Wellington, served in the Irish House of Commons as a Member for the rotten borough of Trim.

Battle of Boxtel

Boxtelwas attacked
On 15 September 1794, at the Battle of Boxtel, east of Breda, Wellington, in temporary command of his brigade, had his first experience of battle.
It is often remembered as being the debut action of Lt Col Arthur Wesley, who later became Arthur Wellesley, the 1st Duke of Wellington.

Anglo-Irish people

Anglo-IrishNew EnglishAnglo-
Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, (1 May 1769 – 14 September 1852) was an Anglo-Irish soldier and Tory statesman who was one of the leading military and political figures of 19th-century Britain, serving twice as Prime Minister.
The Anglo-Irish were also represented among the senior officers of the British Army by men such as Field Marshal Earl Roberts, first honorary Colonel of the Irish Guards regiment, who spent most of his career in British India; Field Marshal Viscount Gough, who served under Wellington, himself a Wellesley born in Dublin to the Earl of Mornington, head of a prominent Anglo-Irish family in Dublin; and in the 20th century Field Marshal Lord Alanbrooke, Field Marshal Lord Alexander of Tunis, General Sir John Winthrop Hackett, Field Marshal Sir Henry Wilson and Field Marshal Sir Garnet Wolseley.

Napoleonic Wars

Napoleonicwar with FranceNapoleonic War
Wellesley rose to prominence as a general during the Peninsular campaign of the Napoleonic Wars, and was promoted to the rank of field marshal after leading the allied forces to victory against the French Empire at the Battle of Vitoria in 1813.
Anglo-Portuguese forces under Arthur Wellesley supported the Spanish, which campaigned successfully against the French armies, eventually driving them from Spain and allowing Britain to invade southern France.

Thomas Pakenham, 2nd Earl of Longford

Earl of LongfordThomasher brother Thomas
In 1793, he sought her hand, but was turned down by her brother Thomas, Earl of Longford, who considered Wellesley to be a young man, in debt, with very poor prospects.
His sister, the Honourable Catherine Pakenham, was the wife of the Duke of Wellington.

Dangan Castle

Dangan
He spent most of his childhood at his family's two homes, the first a large house in Dublin and the second Dangan Castle, 3 mi north of Summerhill on the Trim Road (now the R158) in County Meath.
It was the childhood home of Field Marshal The 1st Duke of Wellington.

Fourth Anglo-Mysore War

Fourth Anglo–Mysore WarFourth Mysore Warthe fall of Mysore
He was a colonel by 1796, and saw action in the Netherlands and in India, where he fought in the Fourth Anglo-Mysore War at the Battle of Seringapatam.
Three armies – one from Bombay and two British (one of which contained a division that was commanded by Colonel Arthur Wellesley, the future 1st Duke of Wellington), marched into Mysore in 1799 and besieged the capital, Srirangapatnam, after some engagements with Tipu.