Article One of the United States Constitution

Article IArticle OneU.S. Const. art. IArticle I, Section 8Suspension ClauseArticle I of the United States ConstitutionCompact ClauseElections ClauseArticle I, Section 2, Clause 3Article I, Section 5
Article One of the United States Constitution establishes the legislative branch of the federal government, the United States Congress.wikipedia
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United States House of Representatives

U.S. RepresentativeU.S. House of RepresentativesUnited States Representative
Under Article One, Congress is a bicameral legislature consisting of the House of Representatives and the Senate.
The composition of the House is established by Article One of the United States Constitution.

Necessary and Proper Clause

necessary and proper“necessary and proper” clauseArticle I, Section 8
Article One grants Congress various enumerated powers and the ability to pass laws "necessary and proper" to carry out those powers.
The Necessary and Proper Clause, also known as the elastic clause, is a clause in Article I, Section 8 of the United States Constitution that is as follows:

Enumerated powers (United States)

enumerated powersenumerated powerSection 8
Article One grants Congress various enumerated powers and the ability to pass laws "necessary and proper" to carry out those powers.
The enumerated powers (also called expressed powers, explicit powers or delegated powers) of the United States Congress are listed in Article I, Section 8 of the United States Constitution.

United States Senate

U.S. SenatorUnited States SenatorU.S. Senate
Under Article One, Congress is a bicameral legislature consisting of the House of Representatives and the Senate.
The composition and powers of the Senate are established by Article One of the United States Constitution.

Seventeenth Amendment to the United States Constitution

Seventeenth Amendment17th Amendmentdirect election of Senators
Section 3 originally required that the state legislatures elect the members of the Senate, but the Seventeenth Amendment, ratified in 1913, provides for the direct election of senators.
The amendment supersedes Article I, §3, Clauses 1 and 2 of the Constitution, under which senators were elected by state legislatures.

Taxing and Spending Clause

Spending ClauseGeneral Welfare Clausetaxing and spending power
It includes several enumerated powers, including the power to lay and collect taxes and tariffs for the "general welfare" of the United States, the power to borrow money, the power to regulate interstate and international commerce, the power to set naturalization laws, the power to coin and regulate money, the power to establish federal courts inferior to the Supreme Court, the power to raise and support military forces, and the power to declare war.
The Taxing and Spending Clause (which contains provisions known as the General Welfare Clause) and the Uniformity Clause, Article I, Section 8, Clause 1 of the United States Constitution, grants the federal government of the United States its power of taxation.

List of United States presidential vetoes

vetoedpresidential vetoveto
Section 7 lays out the procedures for passing a bill, requiring both houses of Congress to pass a bill for it to become law, subject to the veto power of the President of the United States.
The phrase presidential veto does not appear in the United States Constitution, but Article I requires every bill, order, resolution or other act of legislation approved by the Congress of the United States to be presented to the president of the United States for their approval.

United States Congress

CongressU.S. CongressCongressional
Article One of the United States Constitution establishes the legislative branch of the federal government, the United States Congress.
Article One of the United States Constitution states, "All legislative Powers herein granted shall be vested in a Congress of the United States, which shall consist of a Senate and House of Representatives."

Declaration of war by the United States

declaration of wardeclared wardeclare war
It includes several enumerated powers, including the power to lay and collect taxes and tariffs for the "general welfare" of the United States, the power to borrow money, the power to regulate interstate and international commerce, the power to set naturalization laws, the power to coin and regulate money, the power to establish federal courts inferior to the Supreme Court, the power to raise and support military forces, and the power to declare war.
For the United States, Article One, Section Eight of the Constitution says "Congress shall have power to ... declare War."

United States nationality law

AmericanU.S. citizenUnited States
It includes several enumerated powers, including the power to lay and collect taxes and tariffs for the "general welfare" of the United States, the power to borrow money, the power to regulate interstate and international commerce, the power to set naturalization laws, the power to coin and regulate money, the power to establish federal courts inferior to the Supreme Court, the power to raise and support military forces, and the power to declare war.
The United States nationality law refers to the uniform rule of naturalization of the United States set out in the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1952, enacted under the power of Article 1, section 8, clause 4 of the United States Constitution (also referred to as the Nationality Clause), which grants the Congress the power to "establish a uniform Rule of Naturalization..."

President of the United States

PresidentU.S. PresidentUnited States President
Section 7 lays out the procedures for passing a bill, requiring both houses of Congress to pass a bill for it to become law, subject to the veto power of the President of the United States.
In addition, as part of the system of checks and balances, Article I, Section7 of the Constitution gives the president the power to sign or veto federal legislation.

Import-Export Clause

Michelin Tire Corp. v. WagesImport-Exporttaxing imports or exports
Section 10 places limits on the states, prohibiting them from entering into alliances with foreign powers, impairing contracts, taxing imports or exports above the minimum level necessary for inspection, keeping armies, or engaging in war without the consent of Congress.
Article I, § 10, clause 2 of the United States Constitution, known as the Import-Export Clause, prevents the states, without the consent of Congress, from imposing tariffs on imports and exports above what is necessary for their inspection laws and secures for the federal government the revenues from all tariffs on imports and exports.

Article Two of the United States Constitution

Article IIArticle TwoArticle II, Section 1, Clause 6
Similar clauses are found in Articles II and III.
Section 1's Vesting Clause declares that the executive power of the federal government is vested in the president and, along with the Vesting Clauses of Article One and Article Three, establishes the separation of powers among

Article Three of the United States Constitution

Article IIIU.S. Const. art. IIIArticle III of the United States Constitution
Similar clauses are found in Articles II and III.
Along with the Vesting Clauses of Article One and Article Two, Article Three's Vesting Clause establishes the separation of powers between the three branches of government.

Nondelegation doctrine

U.S. Constitution's nondelegation principleconstitutionaldelegate
It also, by implied extension, prohibits Congress from delegating its legislative authority to either of the other branches of government, a rule known as the nondelegation doctrine.
In the Federal Government of the United States, the nondelegation doctrine is the principle that the Congress of the United States, being vested with "all legislative powers" by Article One, Section 1 of the United States Constitution, cannot delegate that power to anyone else.

United States Census

U.S. CensuscensusUS Census
To facilitate this, the Constitution mandates that a census be conducted every ten years to determine the population of each state and of the nation as a whole and establishes a rule for who shall be counted or excluded from the count.
The United States Census (plural censuses or censi) is a decennial census mandated by Article I, Section 2 of the United States Constitution, which states: "Representatives and direct Taxes shall be apportioned among the several States... according to their respective Numbers... . The actual Enumeration shall be made within three years after the first meeting of the Congress of the United States, and within every subsequent Term of ten Years".

Supreme Court of the United States

United States Supreme CourtU.S. Supreme CourtSupreme Court
It includes several enumerated powers, including the power to lay and collect taxes and tariffs for the "general welfare" of the United States, the power to borrow money, the power to regulate interstate and international commerce, the power to set naturalization laws, the power to coin and regulate money, the power to establish federal courts inferior to the Supreme Court, the power to raise and support military forces, and the power to declare war.
Article III of the Constitution sets neither the size of the Supreme Court nor any specific positions on it (though existence of the office of chief justice is tacitly acknowledged in Article I, Section 3, Clause 6).

Citizenship of the United States

United States citizenAmericanU.S. citizen
The Constitution provides three requirements for Representatives: A Representative must be at least 25 years old, must be an inhabitant of the state in which he or she is elected, and must have been a citizen of the United States for the previous seven years.
In Article One of the Constitution, the power to establish a "uniform rule of naturalization" is granted explicitly to Congress.

Ballot access

on the ballotballot statusnot allowed on the ballot
However, the United States Supreme Court has ruled that certain ballot access requirements, such as filing fees and submitting a certain number of valid petition signatures do not constitute additional qualifications and thus few Constitutional restrictions exist as to how harsh ballot access laws can be.
As the nation's election process is decentralized by Article I, Section 4, of the United States Constitution, ballot access laws are established and enforced by the states.

U.S. state

StatestatesU. S. state
Article One also establishes the procedures for passing a bill and places various limits on the powers of Congress and the states.
Powers of the U.S Congress are enumerated in Article I, Section 8, for example, the power to declare war.

Classes of United States senators

Senate class numbersclass 2class 1
After the first group of Senators was elected to the First Congress (1789–1791), the Senators were divided into three "classes" as nearly equal in size as possible, as required by this section.
The three classes were established by Article I, Section 3, Clause 2 of the U.S. Constitution.

Sixteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution

Sixteenth Amendment16th AmendmentSixteenth
To permit the levying of such an income tax, Congress proposed and the states ratified the Sixteenth Amendment, which removed the restriction by specifically providing that Congress could levy a tax on income "from whatever source derived" without it being apportioned among the States or otherwise based on a State's share of the national population.
Article I, Section 2, Clause 3:

1st United States Congress

First CongressFirst United States Congress1st Congress
After the first group of Senators was elected to the First Congress (1789–1791), the Senators were divided into three "classes" as nearly equal in size as possible, as required by this section.
The apportionment of seats in the House of Representatives was based on the provisions of [[Article One of the United States Constitution#Clause 3: Apportionment of Representatives and taxes|Article I, Section 2, Clause 3]] of the Constitution.

List of tie-breaking votes cast by the vice president of the United States

tie-breaking votetie-breaking votesany tie-breaking votes
, a tie-breaking vote has been cast 268 times.
The vice president of the United States is the ex officio president of the Senate, as provided in Article I, Section 3, Clause 4, of the United States Constitution, but may only vote in order to break a tie.

President pro tempore of the United States Senate

President pro temporePresident pro tempore of the SenatePresident ''pro tempore'' of the Senate
Clause five provides for a President pro tempore of the Senate, a Senator elected to the post by the Senate, to preside over the body when the Vice President is either absent or exercising the Office of the President.
Article One, Section Three of the United States Constitution provides that the vice president of the United States is the president of the Senate (despite not being a senator), and mandates that the Senate must choose a president pro tempore to act in the vice president's absence.