Article Two of the United States Constitution

Article IIArticle TwoArticle II, Section 1, Clause 6Take Care ClauseU.S. Const. art. IIArticle II of the United States ConstitutionArticle II, Section 1Article II, Section 1, Clause 2Article II of the ConstitutionArticle II, Section 2
Article Two of the United States Constitution establishes the executive branch of the federal government, which carries out and enforces federal laws.wikipedia
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Constitution of the United States

United States ConstitutionU.S. ConstitutionConstitution
Article Two of the United States Constitution establishes the executive branch of the federal government, which carries out and enforces federal laws.
Its first three articles embody the doctrine of the separation of powers, whereby the federal government is divided into three branches: the legislative, consisting of the bicameral Congress (Article One); the executive, consisting of the president (Article Two); and the judicial, consisting of the Supreme Court and other federal courts (Article Three).

President of the United States

PresidentU.S. PresidentUnited States President
Article Two vests the power of the executive branch in the office of the president of the United States, lays out the procedures for electing and removing the president, and establishes the president's powers and responsibilities.
Article II of the Constitution establishes the executive branch of the federal government.

Article Three of the United States Constitution

Article IIIU.S. Const. art. IIIArticle III of the United States Constitution
Section 1's Vesting Clause declares that the executive power of the federal government is vested in the president and, along with the Vesting Clauses of Article One and Article Three, establishes the separation of powers among
Along with the Vesting Clauses of Article One and Article Two, Article Three's Vesting Clause establishes the separation of powers between the three branches of government.

Article One of the United States Constitution

Article IArticle OneU.S. Const. art. I
Section 1's Vesting Clause declares that the executive power of the federal government is vested in the president and, along with the Vesting Clauses of Article One and Article Three, establishes the separation of powers among The president is the military's commander-in-chief; however Article One gives Congress and not the president the exclusive right to declare war.
Similar clauses are found in Articles II and III.

Oath of office of the President of the United States

oath of officepresidential oath of officepresidential oath
Section 1 also sets forth the eligibility requirements for the office of the president, provides procedures in case of a presidential vacancy, and requires the president to take an oath of office.
The wording of the oath is specified in Article II, Section One, Clause 8, of the United States Constitution.

Treaty Clause

treatiestreatycan be overturned by a future elected President
The Treaty Clause grants the president the power to enter into treaties with the approval of two-thirds of the Senate.
The Treaty Clause is part of Article II, Section 2, Clause 2 of the United States Constitution that empowers the President of the United States to propose and chiefly negotiate agreements between the United States and other countries, which, upon receiving the advice and consent of a two-thirds supermajority vote of the United States Senate, become binding with the force of federal law.

Appointments Clause

Article II, Section 2, Clause 2Presidential appointeenominated
The Appointments Clause grants the president the power to appoint judges and public officials subject to the advice and consent of the Senate, which in practice has meant that presidential appointees must be confirmed by a majority vote in the Senate.
The Appointments Clause is part of Article II, Section 2, Clause 2 of the United States Constitution, which empowers the President of the United States to nominate and, with the advice and consent (confirmation) of the United States Senate, appoint public officials.

Federal pardons in the United States

pardonpardonedpresidential pardon
Section 2 of Article Two lays out the powers of the presidency, establishing that the president serves as the commander-in-chief of the military and has the power to grant pardons and require the "principal officer" of any executive department to tender advice.
The authority to take such action is granted to the president by [[Article Two of the United States Constitution#Clause 1: Command of military; Opinions of cabinet secretaries; Pardons|Article II, Section 2, Clause 1]] of the U.S. Constitution.

Contingent election

electno candidate receives the minimum 270 electoral votes needed to win the electiontie-breaker by the United States House of Representatives
Section 1 lays out the procedures of the Electoral College and requires the House of Representatives to hold a contingent election to select the president if no individual wins a majority of the electoral vote.
The contingent election procedure, along with the other parts of the presidential election process, was first established in Article Two, Section 1, Clause 3 of the United States Constitution, and then modified by the 12th Amendment in 1804.

Impeachment in the United States

impeachmentimpeachedimpeach
Section 4 of Article Two establishes that the president and other officers can be removed from office through the impeachment process, which is further described in Article One.
Article II, Section 2 provides:

Recess appointment

recess appointedrecess-appointedrecess appointments
The final clause of Section 2 grants the president the power to make recess appointments to fill vacancies that occur when the Senate is in recess.
A recess appointment under Article II, Section 2, Clause 3 of the Constitution is an alternative method of appointing officials that allows the filling of vacancies to maintain the continuity of administrative government through the temporary filling of offices during periods when the Senate is not in session.

United States Electoral College

Electoral Collegepresidential electorelectoral votes
Section 1 also establishes the Electoral College, the body charged with electing the president and the vice president.
According to [[Article Two of the United States Constitution#Clause 2: Method of choosing electors|Article II, Section 1, Clause 2]] of the Constitution, each state legislature determines the manner by which its state's electors are chosen.

United States presidential inauguration

inaugurationInauguration Daypresidential inauguration
Additionally, prior to ratification of the Twentieth Amendment (which brought forward the date on which Congress convenes from December to January) in 1933, newly inaugurated presidents would routinely call the Senate to meet to confirm nominations or ratify treaties.
Recitation of the presidential oath of office is the only component in this ceremony mandated by the United States Constitution (in Article II, Section One, Clause 8).

Natural-born-citizen clause

natural-born citizennatural born citizenNatural born citizen of the United States
Section 1 of [[Article Two of the United States Constitution#Clause 5: Qualifications for office|Article Two]] of the United States Constitution sets forth the eligibility requirements for serving as president of the United States, under clause 5 (emphasis added):

United States presidential line of succession

presidential line of successionline of successionline of succession to the presidency
The Congress may provide for a line of succession beyond the vice president.
Presidential succession is referred to multiple times in the U.S. Constitution – Article II, Section 1, Clause 6, as well as the 12th Amendment, 20th Amendment, and 25th Amendment.

Twenty-fifth Amendment to the United States Constitution

25th AmendmentTwenty-fifth Amendment25th Amendment to the United States Constitution
The 25th Amendment explicitly states that if the president dies, resigns or is removed from office, the vice president becomes president, and also establishes a procedure for filling a vacancy in the office of the vice president.
Article II, Section 1, Clause 6 of the Constitution reads:

Officer of the United States

officers of the United Stateshighest-ranked appointed officialsinferior officers of the United States
There are concerns regarding the constitutionality of having members of Congress in the line of succession, however, as this clause specifies that only an "officer of the United States" may be designated as a presidential successor.
The Appointments Clause of the Constitution (Article II, section 2, clause 2), empowers the President of the United States to appoint "Officers of the United States" with the "advice and consent" of the United States Senate.

Oath of office of the Vice President of the United States

vice presidential oathsworn into officevice presidential oath of office
Currently, the vice presidential oath is the same as that for members of Congress.
Although the United States Constitution—Article II, Section One, Clause 8—specifically sets forth the oath required by incoming presidents, it does not do so for incoming vice presidents.

Vesting Clauses

Vesting ClausevestsArticle I, Section1
Section 1's Vesting Clause declares that the executive power of the federal government is vested in the president and, along with the Vesting Clauses of Article One and Article Three, establishes the separation of powers among
[[Article Two of the United States Constitution#Section 1: President and Vice President|Article II, Section 1, Clause 1]]:

Cabinet of the United States

Cabinetcabinet secretaryUnited States Cabinet
Though not required by Article Two, President George Washington organized the principal officers of the executive departments into the Cabinet, a practice that subsequent presidents have followed.
The Cabinet's role, inferred from the language of the Opinion Clause (Article II, Section 2, Clause 1) of the Constitution, is to serve as an advisory body to the president of the United States.

John Tyler

TylerPresident TylerJohn Tyler, Jr.
Harrison's vice president, John Tyler, believed that he had the right to become president.
Article II, Section 1, Clause 6 of the United States Constitution, which governed intra-term presidential succession at the time (now superseded by the Twenty-fifth Amendment), states that:

War Powers Clause

war powerspower to declare warconstitutionality
The president is the military's commander-in-chief; however Article One gives Congress and not the president the exclusive right to declare war.
American Presidents often have not sought formal declarations of war, instead maintaining that they have the Constitutional authority, as commander in chief (Article Two, Section Two) to use the military for "police actions".

State of the Union

State of the Union Addressannual message to Congressannual message
Section 3 requires the president to inform Congress of the "state of the union"; since 1913 this has taken the form of a speech referred to as the State of the Union.
The address fulfills the requirement in [[Article Two of the United States Constitution#Section 3: Presidential responsibilities|Article II, Section 3]] of the U.S. Constitution for the President to periodically "give to the Congress Information of the State of the Union, and recommend to their Consideration such measures as he shall judge necessary and expedient."

1800 United States presidential election

18001800 presidential electionelection of 1800
This procedure was followed in 1801 after the electoral vote produced a tie, and nearly resulted in a deadlock in the House.
The Constitution, in Article II, Section 1, provided that the state legislatures should decide the manner in which their electors were chosen.

William Henry Harrison

William H. HarrisonHarrisonWilliam Harrison
When William Henry Harrison died in office, a debate arose over whether the vice president would become president, or if he would just inherit the powers, thus becoming an acting president.
Harrison's death called attention to an ambiguity in Article II, Section 1, Clause 6 of the Constitution regarding succession to the presidency.