Artillery battery

batterybatteriesartillery batteriesgun batteryshore batteriesgun batteriesartillery positionsartillerycannon batteriesbattery of artillery
In military organizations, an artillery battery is a unit of artillery, mortars, rocket artillery, multiple rocket launchers, surface to surface missiles, ballistic missiles, cruise missiles, etc., so grouped to facilitate better battlefield communication and command and control, as well as to provide dispersion for its constituent gunnery crews and their systems.wikipedia
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Artillery

heavy artilleryordnanceartillery piece
In military organizations, an artillery battery is a unit of artillery, mortars, rocket artillery, multiple rocket launchers, surface to surface missiles, ballistic missiles, cruise missiles, etc., so grouped to facilitate better battlefield communication and command and control, as well as to provide dispersion for its constituent gunnery crews and their systems.
Several such crews and teams with other functions are combined into a unit of artillery, usually called a battery, although sometimes called a company.

Howitzer

howitzersHTowed howitzer
Such batteries could be a mixture of cannon, howitzer, or mortar types. In modern battery organization, the military unit typically has six to eight howitzers or six to nine rocket launchers and 100 to 200 personnel and is the equivalent of a company in terms of organisation level.
Howitzers, like other artillery equipment, are usually organized in groups called batteries.

Coastal artillery

Coast Artilleryshore batteriesshore battery
Coastal artillery sometimes had completely different organizational terms based on shore defence sector areas.
Coastal artillery is the branch of the armed forces concerned with operating anti-ship artillery or fixed gun batteries in coastal fortifications.

Grand Battery

Grande BatterieGrand Batteriesgrandes batteries
Groups of batteries combined for field combat employment called Grand Batteries by Napoleon.
It involved massing all available batteries into a single large, temporary one, and concentrating the firepower of their guns at a single point in the enemy's lines.

Captain (armed forces)

CaptaincaptainsCapt.
The full battery was typically commanded by a captain.
Today, a captain is typically either the commander or second-in-command of a company or artillery battery (or United States Army cavalry troop or Commonwealth squadron).

Squadron (army)

squadronsquadronscavalry squadron
Administratively batteries were usually grouped in battalions, regiments or squadrons and these developed into tactical organisations.
In the British Army and many other Commonwealth armies, a squadron is the Royal Armoured Corps counterpart of an infantry company or artillery battery.

Broadside

broadsidesbroad sidedeadly shower of splinters
Advanced warships in the Age of Sail, such as the ship of the line, mounted dozens of similar cannons grouped in broadsides, sometimes spread over several decks.
A broadside is the side of a ship, the battery of cannon on one side of a warship; or their coordinated fire in naval warfare.

Brigade

Brigade CommanderbrigadesArmoured brigade
These were further grouped into regiments, simply "group" or brigades, that may be wholly composed of artillery units or combined arms in composition.
This was because, unlike infantry battalions and cavalry regiments, which were organic, artillery units consisted of individually numbered batteries that were "brigaded" together.

Kazimierz Siemienowicz

Kazimieras SimonavičiusCasimir Siemienowicz
Artillery battery origins from a Grand Duchy of Lithuania bajoras and artillery expert Kazimieras Simonavičius' book Artis Magnae Artilleriae (Didysis artilerijos menas, The Great Art of Artillery) published in 1650, which contains a large chapter on caliber, construction, production and properties of rockets (for military and civil purposes), including multistage rockets, batteries of rockets, and rockets with delta wing stabilizers.
It contains a large chapter on caliber, construction, production and properties of rockets (for military and civil purposes), including multistage rockets, batteries of rockets, and rockets with delta wing stabilizers (instead of the common guiding rods).

Battalion

infantry battalionRegimentbattalion commander
Administratively batteries were usually grouped in battalions, regiments or squadrons and these developed into tactical organisations.
A standard U.S. Marine infantry battalion is typically supported by an artillery battery and a platoon each of tanks, amphibious assault vehicles, light armored reconnaissance vehicles, reconnaissance Marines, and combat engineers.

Ship of the line

ships of the lineship-of-the-lineships-of-the-line
Advanced warships in the Age of Sail, such as the ship of the line, mounted dozens of similar cannons grouped in broadsides, sometimes spread over several decks.
As the use of broadsides (coordinated fire by the battery of cannon on one side of a warship) became increasingly dominant in battle, tactics changed.

Military organization

formationmilitary unitunit
In military organizations, an artillery battery is a unit of artillery, mortars, rocket artillery, multiple rocket launchers, surface to surface missiles, ballistic missiles, cruise missiles, etc., so grouped to facilitate better battlefield communication and command and control, as well as to provide dispersion for its constituent gunnery crews and their systems. In modern battery organization, the military unit typically has six to eight howitzers or six to nine rocket launchers and 100 to 200 personnel and is the equivalent of a company in terms of organisation level.

Company (military unit)

companycompaniesrifle companies
In modern battery organization, the military unit typically has six to eight howitzers or six to nine rocket launchers and 100 to 200 personnel and is the equivalent of a company in terms of organisation level.
The corresponding unit of artillery is always called a battery.

Field artillery team

fire direction centerbattery officerFDC
Typically, there is one FDC for a battery of six guns, in a light division.

Mortar (weapon)

mortarmortarsspigot mortar
In military organizations, an artillery battery is a unit of artillery, mortars, rocket artillery, multiple rocket launchers, surface to surface missiles, ballistic missiles, cruise missiles, etc., so grouped to facilitate better battlefield communication and command and control, as well as to provide dispersion for its constituent gunnery crews and their systems.

Rocket artillery

artillery rocketrocketsartillery rockets
In military organizations, an artillery battery is a unit of artillery, mortars, rocket artillery, multiple rocket launchers, surface to surface missiles, ballistic missiles, cruise missiles, etc., so grouped to facilitate better battlefield communication and command and control, as well as to provide dispersion for its constituent gunnery crews and their systems.

Surface-to-surface missile

SSMsurface-to-surfaceSSMs
In military organizations, an artillery battery is a unit of artillery, mortars, rocket artillery, multiple rocket launchers, surface to surface missiles, ballistic missiles, cruise missiles, etc., so grouped to facilitate better battlefield communication and command and control, as well as to provide dispersion for its constituent gunnery crews and their systems.

Ballistic missile

ballistic missilesthrow-weightballistic
In military organizations, an artillery battery is a unit of artillery, mortars, rocket artillery, multiple rocket launchers, surface to surface missiles, ballistic missiles, cruise missiles, etc., so grouped to facilitate better battlefield communication and command and control, as well as to provide dispersion for its constituent gunnery crews and their systems.

Cruise missile

cruise missileshypersonic cruise missilecruise
In military organizations, an artillery battery is a unit of artillery, mortars, rocket artillery, multiple rocket launchers, surface to surface missiles, ballistic missiles, cruise missiles, etc., so grouped to facilitate better battlefield communication and command and control, as well as to provide dispersion for its constituent gunnery crews and their systems.

Military communications

Signalscommunicationssignal
In military organizations, an artillery battery is a unit of artillery, mortars, rocket artillery, multiple rocket launchers, surface to surface missiles, ballistic missiles, cruise missiles, etc., so grouped to facilitate better battlefield communication and command and control, as well as to provide dispersion for its constituent gunnery crews and their systems.

Command and control

command postC4ISRC4I
In military organizations, an artillery battery is a unit of artillery, mortars, rocket artillery, multiple rocket launchers, surface to surface missiles, ballistic missiles, cruise missiles, etc., so grouped to facilitate better battlefield communication and command and control, as well as to provide dispersion for its constituent gunnery crews and their systems.

Naval artillery

naval gunnaval gunsgunnery
The term is also used in a naval context to describe groups of guns on warships.

Warship

warshipsshipswar ship
The term is also used in a naval context to describe groups of guns on warships.

Grand Duchy of Lithuania

LithuaniaLithuanianGrand Duke of Lithuania
Artillery battery origins from a Grand Duchy of Lithuania bajoras and artillery expert Kazimieras Simonavičius' book Artis Magnae Artilleriae (Didysis artilerijos menas, The Great Art of Artillery) published in 1650, which contains a large chapter on caliber, construction, production and properties of rockets (for military and civil purposes), including multistage rockets, batteries of rockets, and rockets with delta wing stabilizers.

Lithuanian nobility

Lithuanian noblesLithuanian nobleLithuanian
Artillery battery origins from a Grand Duchy of Lithuania bajoras and artillery expert Kazimieras Simonavičius' book Artis Magnae Artilleriae (Didysis artilerijos menas, The Great Art of Artillery) published in 1650, which contains a large chapter on caliber, construction, production and properties of rockets (for military and civil purposes), including multistage rockets, batteries of rockets, and rockets with delta wing stabilizers.