Ashanti Empire

Ashanti ConfederacyAshantiKingdom of AshantiAsanteAsantemanEmpire of AshantiAshanti KingdomAshantilandAsante EmpireAsante Confederacy
The Ashanti Empire (Twi: Asanteman) was an Akan empire and kingdom from 1670 to 1957 in what is now modern-day Ghana.wikipedia
699 Related Articles

Ghana

GhanaianRepublic of GhanaGHA
The Ashanti Empire (Twi: Asanteman) was an Akan empire and kingdom from 1670 to 1957 in what is now modern-day Ghana. It expanded from Ashanti to include the Brong-Ahafo Region, Central Region, Eastern Region, Greater Accra Region and Western Region of present-day Ghana.
Numerous kingdoms and empires emerged over the centuries, of which the most powerful was the Kingdom of Ashanti.

Denkyira

DenkyeraAkan state of Denkyira
In 1701, the Ashanti army conquered Denkyira, giving the Ashanti access to the Gulf of Guinea and the Atlantic Ocean coastal trade with Europeans, notably the Dutch.
Denkyira was a powerful nation of Akan people that existed on the Ashantiland peninsula from the 1620s, in what is now modern-day Ghana.

Sub-Saharan Africa

sub-SaharanSub Saharan AfricaSub-Saharan African
Due to the empire's military prowess, wealth, architecture, sophisticated hierarchy and culture, the Ashanti Kingdom has been extensively studied and has more historiographies by European, primarily British authors than any other indigenous culture of Sub-Saharan Africa.
The Ashanti Empire arose in the 16th century in modern-day Ghana and Ivory Coast.

Golden Stool

Golden Stool of AshantidestooledGolden Stool of Asante
1695 – 1717) and his adviser Okomfo Anokye established the Ashanti Kingdom, with the Golden Stool of Asante as a sole unifying symbol.
The Golden Stool (Ashanti-Sika dwa; full title, Sika Dwa Kofi "the Golden Stool born on a Friday") is the royal and divine throne of kings of the Ashanti people and the ultimate symbol of power in Asante.

Dutch Gold Coast

Gold CoastDutchDutch Guinea
In 1701, the Ashanti army conquered Denkyira, giving the Ashanti access to the Gulf of Guinea and the Atlantic Ocean coastal trade with Europeans, notably the Dutch.
After the Battle of Feyiase (1701), the Ashanti Empire replaced the Denkyira as the dominant power, and the Dutch began paying tribute to the Ashanti instead.

Akan people

AkanAkansAkan state
The Ashanti Empire (Twi: Asanteman) was an Akan empire and kingdom from 1670 to 1957 in what is now modern-day Ghana.
This brought wealth to numerous Akan states like Akwamu Empire (1550–1650), and ultimately led to the rise of the well known Akan empire, the Empire of Ashanti (1700–1900), the most dominant of the Akan states.

Fante Confederacy

FanteFante ConfederationFanti Confederation
The standard explanation has long been that the Fante states were forced to form a confederation by the rapid growth of the Ashanti Confederacy in the early eighteenth century that began to threaten the security of the surrounding region.

Ashanti people

AshantiAsanteAshantis
Ashanti political organization was originally centered on clans headed by a paramount chief or Amanhene.
The wealthy gold-rich Asante people developed the large and influential Asante Empire, along the Lake Volta and Gulf of Guinea.

Kumasi

Kumasi, GhanaKumaseCoomassie
One particular clan, the Oyoko, settled in the Ashanti's sub-tropical forest region, establishing a center at Kumasi.
Kumasi is near Lake Bosomtwe, in a rain forest region, and is the commercial, industrial and cultural capital of the historical Ashanti Empire.

Osei Kofi Tutu I

Osei TutuOsei Tutu IAshanti King Asantehene Osei Tutu I
Starting in the late 17th century, the Ashanti king Osei Tutu (c.
Osei Kofi Tutu I was one of the founders of the Ashanti Empire, aided by Okomfo Anokye, his chief priest.

Central Region (Ghana)

Central RegionCentralCentral Region of Ghana
It expanded from Ashanti to include the Brong-Ahafo Region, Central Region, Eastern Region, Greater Accra Region and Western Region of present-day Ghana.
The Central Region is a major center for tourism within the peninsula of Ashantiland and it has some of the most beautiful beaches, and national parks (Kakum National Park).

Akwamu

Chief of Akwamu Adumasa
Nana Ansa Sasraku also played an important role in the life of the King Osei Tutu of Asante by protecting him from the Denkyiria.

Battle of Feyiase

The Ashanti Kingdom utterly defeated them at the Battle of Feyiase, proclaiming its independence in 1701.
The Battle of Feyiase was the decisive battle in the struggle that led to the Ashanti Empire replacing Denkyira as the dominant power among the Twi-speaking Akan peoples.

Otumfuo Nana Osei Tutu II

Osei Tutu IIOtumfuo Osei Tutu IIAsantehene
The current king of the Ashanti Kingdom is Otumfuo Osei Tutu II Asantehene.
By name, Otumfuo Osei Tutu II is in direct succession to the 17th century co-founder of the Ashanti Empire, Otumfuo Osei Tutu I.

Yaa Asantewaa

Empress Ya AsantewaaNana Yaa AsantewaaQueen Mother Yaa Asantewaa
The resistance was led by Asante queen Yaa Asantewaa, Queen-Mother of Ejisu.
Yaa Asantewaa (17 October 1840 – 17 October 1921) was the queen mother of Ejisu in the Ashanti Empire – now part of modern-day Ghana, appointed by her brother Nana Akwasi Afrane Opese, the Edwesuhene, or ruler, of Edwesu.

Gold Coast (British colony)

Gold CoastGold Coast ColonyBritish Gold Coast
The British formally declared the state of the Ashanti Kingdom and the coastal regions to be the Gold Coast colony.
Britain steadily expanded its colony through the invasion and subjection of local kingdoms as well, particularly the Ashanti and Fante confederacies.

War of the Golden Stool

Third Ashanti ExpeditionYaa Asantewaa WarAshanti War
From March 28 to late September 1900, the Asante and British were engaged in what would become known as the War of the Golden Stool.
The War of the Golden Stool, also known as the Yaa Asantewaa War, the Third Ashanti Expedition, the Ashanti Uprising, or variations thereof, was the final war in a series of conflicts between the British Imperial government of the Gold Coast (later Ghana) and the Ashanti Empire (later Ashanti Region), an autonomous state in West Africa that fractiously co-existed with the British and its vassal coastal tribes.

Resident (title)

ResidentBritish ResidentMinister Resident
A British Resident was permanently placed in the city of Kumasi, and soon after a British fort was built there.

Ivor Wilks

Ivor WilkesWilks, Ivor
Scholars of Ashanti history, such as Larry Yarak and Ivor Wilkes, disagree over the power of this sophisticated bureaucracy in comparison to the Asantahene, but agree that it was a sign of a highly developed government with a complex system of checks and balances.
He was an authority on the Asante Kingdom in Ghana and the Welsh working-class movement in the 19th century.

Ashanti Protectorate

Protectorate
In January 1902, Britain finally designated the Ashanti Kingdom as a protectorate.
Ashanti Protectorate was established 1902 from the Ashanti Confederacy now Ashanti Region.

Slavery

slaveslavesenslaved
This led to trade in gold, ivory, slaves, and other goods with the Portuguese, which gave rise to kingdoms such as the Ashanti.
These expeditions were typically carried out by African kingdoms, such as the Oyo empire (Yoruba), the Ashanti Empire, the kingdom of Dahomey, and the Aro Confederacy.

Manhyia Palace

Manhyia Palace MuseumManhyia Royal Palace
The current residence of the Asantehene is the Manhyia Palace built in 1925 by the British and presented to the Prempeh I as a present upon his return from exile.
The Manhyia (Akan language meaning Oman - gathering of the town's people) Palace is the seat of the Asantehene of Asanteman, as well as his official residence.

Prempeh I

Kwaku Dua III AsamuKing Prempeh IOtumfuo Agyemang Prempeh I
The current residence of the Asantehene is the Manhyia Palace built in 1925 by the British and presented to the Prempeh I as a present upon his return from exile.
Prempeh I (Otumfuo Nana Prempeh I, 18 December 1870 – 12 May 1931) was the thirteenth king ruler of the Asante state of the Kingdom of Ashanti and the Asante Oyoko Abohyen Dynasty.

Thomas Edward Bowdich

BowdichBodwichThomas Bowdich
On May 15, 1817 the Englishman Thomas Bowdich entered Kumasi.
In 1817, he was sent, with two companions, William Hutchison and Henry Tedlie, to Kumasi on a mission to the king of Ashanti, and chiefly through his skillful diplomacy the mission succeeded in its object of securing British control over the coast natives.

William Winwood Reade

Winwood Reade
Winwood Reade also described his visit to the Ashanti Royal Palace of Kumasi in 1874:
After failing to get permission to enter the Ashanti Confederacy, Reade set out north from Freetown to explore the areas past the Solimana capital of Falaba.