Kitabatake Chikafusa, as drawn by Japanese painter Kikuchi Yosai
Portrait traditionally identified as that of Ashikaga Takauji
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Tomb of Ashikaga Takauji at Tōji-in in Kyoto

In particular, he disliked Ashikaga Takauji, the first Ashikaga shogun, who had originally supported Go-Daigo's claim to the Throne, but who ultimately headed the Northern Court and sought to destroy all who supported the Emperor's Southern Court.

- Kitabatake Chikafusa

1354 – Takauji flees with Go-Kōgon; Kitabatake Chikafusa dies.

- Ashikaga Takauji

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The Imperial seats during the Nanboku-chō period were in relatively close proximity, but geographically distinct. They were conventionally identified as:

Nanboku-chō period

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The Imperial seats during the Nanboku-chō period were in relatively close proximity, but geographically distinct. They were conventionally identified as:
Emperor Go-Daigo
Ashikaga Takauji

The Nanboku-chō period (南北朝時代, Nanboku-chō jidai, "North and South court period", also known as the Northern and Southern Courts period), spanning from 1336 to 1392, was a period that occurred during the formative years of the Muromachi (Ashikaga) shogunate of Japanese history.During the early period, there existed a Northern Imperial Court, established by Ashikaga Takauji in Kyoto, and a Southern Imperial Court, established by Emperor Go-Daigo in Yoshino.

Two of the movement's greatest spokesmen were Prince Morinaga and Kitabatake Chikafusa.

Emperor Go-Murakami

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The 97th emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession, and a member of the Southern Court during the Nanboku-chō period of rival courts.

The 97th emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession, and a member of the Southern Court during the Nanboku-chō period of rival courts.

Memorial Shinto shrine and mausoleum honoring Emperor Go-Murakami
Japanese Imperial kamon — a stylized chrysanthemum blossom

However, in 1336, because Ashikaga Takauji had raised a rebellion, the Emperor returned to Sakamoto with a strong force to confront him.

Kitabatake Chikafusa became his advisor.

Kitabatake Akiie (portrait property of Ryozen Shrine)

Kitabatake Akiie

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Japanese court noble, and an important supporter of the Southern Court during the Nanboku-chō Wars.

Japanese court noble, and an important supporter of the Southern Court during the Nanboku-chō Wars.

Kitabatake Akiie (portrait property of Ryozen Shrine)

His father was Imperial advisor Kitabatake Chikafusa.

Three years later, he led an army nominally under the command of Norinaga to the outskirts of Kyoto to reinforce the forces of Nitta Yoshisada against Ashikaga Takauji.

Southern Court

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The Southern Court (南朝) were a set of four emperors (Emperor Go-Daigo and his line) whose claims to sovereignty during the Nanboku-chō period spanning from 1336 through 1392 were usurped by the Northern Court.

The Southern Court (南朝) were a set of four emperors (Emperor Go-Daigo and his line) whose claims to sovereignty during the Nanboku-chō period spanning from 1336 through 1392 were usurped by the Northern Court.

The Imperial seats during the Nanboku-chō period were in relatively close proximity, but geographically distinct. They were conventionally identified as:

The Northern Court established in Kyoto by Ashikaga Takauji is therefore considered illegitimate.

Varley, H. Paul, ed. (1980). A Chronicle of Gods and Sovereigns: Jinnō Shōtōki (translated from the 1359 Kitabatake Chikafusa work). New York: Columbia University Press. ISBN: 978-0-231-04940-5; OCLC 311157159