The Jews in Central Europe (1881)
The Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth at its greatest extent.
The medieval Cathedral of Worms
Jews from Worms (Germany) wearing the mandatory yellow badge.
Town hall of Worms
The example of the chevra kadisha, the Jewish burial society, Prague, 1772
St Martin's Church
Map of Worms in 1630: The Jewish ghetto is marked in yellow.
The Gothic Liebfrauenkirche (Church of Our Lady). Wine from the adjacent vineyard gave its name to the (now more generic) Liebfraumilch style.
Worms' twin towns
Ludwig Edinger painted by Lovis Corinth
Johann Nikolaus Götz 1755
Rudi Stephan

The Ashkenazi religious rite developed in cities such as Mainz, Worms, and Troyes.

- Ashkenazi Jews

The Free Imperial City of Worms, known in medieval Hebrew by the name Varmayza or Vermaysa (ורמיזא, ורמישא), was a centre of medieval Ashkenazic Judaism.

- Worms, Germany
The Jews in Central Europe (1881)

1 related topic

Alpha

16th-century depiction of Rashi

Rashi

Medieval French rabbi and author of a comprehensive commentary on the Talmud and commentary on the Hebrew Bible (the Tanakh).

Medieval French rabbi and author of a comprehensive commentary on the Talmud and commentary on the Hebrew Bible (the Tanakh).

16th-century depiction of Rashi
Rashi Synagogue, Worms
Exterior of Rashi's Synagogue, Worms, Germany
Monument in memory of Rashi in Troyes, France. Sculptor: Raymond Moretti, 1992.
A modern translation of Rashi's commentary on the Chumash, published by Artscroll
Title page of an English translation of Rashi's Commentary on the Pentateuch.
Raschihaus, Jewish Museum, Worms, Germany.
The complete Hebrew alphabet in Rashi script [right to left].

Another legend also states that Rashi's parents moved to Worms, Germany while Rashi's mother was pregnant.

It was immediately accepted as authoritative by all Jewish communities, Ashkenazi and Sephardi alike.