A report on Asia

Map of the most populous part of Asia showing physical, political and population characteristics, as per 2018
Definitions used for the boundary between Europe and Asia in different periods of History. The commonly accepted modern definition mostly fits with the lines "B" and "F" in this image.
Afro-Eurasia shown in green
Ptolemy's Asia
The province of Asia highlighted (in red) within the Roman Empire.
The Silk Road connected civilizations across Asia
The Mongol Empire at its greatest extent. The gray area is the later Timurid Empire.
The Himalayan range is home to some of the planet's highest peaks.
Division of Asia into regions by the UNSD
Graph showing temperature change in Asia from 1901 to 2021. Climate change is having major impacts on many countries in the continent.
Singapore has one of the busiest container ports in the world and is the world's fourth largest foreign exchange trading center.
Mumbai is one of the most populous cities on the continent. The city is an infrastructure and tourism hub, and plays a crucial role in the economy of India.
Wat Phra Kaew in the Grand Palace is among Bangkok's major tourist attractions.
Graph showing population by continent as a percentage of world population (1750–2005)
The Western Wall and the Dome of the Rock, Jerusalem
The Church of the Nativity in Bethlehem
Pilgrims in the annual Hajj at the Kaabah in Mecca.
The Swaminarayan Akshardham Temple in Delhi, according to the Guinness World Records is the World's Largest Comprehensive Hindu Temple
The Hindu-Buddhist temple of Angkor Wat in Cambodia, the largest religious monument in the world
A refugee special train in Ambala, Punjab during the partition of India in 1947
US forces drop Napalm on suspected Viet Cong positions in 1965
Wounded civilians arrive at a hospital in Aleppo during the Syrian Civil War, October 2012
Demonstrations in Hong Kong against the Extradition bill began in March 2019 and turned into continuing mass movements, drawing around 2 million protesters by June
Indian polymath Rabindranath Tagore was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1913, and became Asia's first Nobel laureate.
From 1841 to 1997, Hong Kong was a British colony.
The threefold division of the Old World into Europe, Asia and Africa has been in use since the 6th century BC, due to Greek geographers such as Anaximander and Hecataeus.
1825 map of Asia by Sidney Edwards Morse.
Map of western, southern, and central Asia in 1885<ref>{{cite web |url=http://www.wdl.org/en/item/11753/#institution=library-of-congress&page=17 |title=A Map of the Countries between Constantinople and Calcutta: Including Turkey in Asia, Persia, Afghanistan and Turkestan |website=Wdl.org |access-date=9 November 2017 |url-status=live |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20171017220525/https://www.wdl.org/en/item/11753/#institution=library-of-congress&page=17 |archive-date=17 October 2017 |year=1885 }}</ref>
The map of Asia in 1796, which also included the continent of Australia (then known as New Holland).
1890 map of Asia
Kerala backwaters
Mongolian steppe
South China Karst
Altai Mountains
Hunza Valley
Atolls of the Maldives
Wadi Rum in Jordan
Japanese wedding at the Meiji Shrine
Hindu festival celebrated by Singapore's Tamil community
Bar mitzvah at the Western Wall in Jerusalem
Catholic procession of the Black Nazarene in Manila
Druze dignitaries celebrating the Ziyarat al-Nabi Shu'ayb festival at the tomb of the prophet in Hittin
Christian Armenians praying at the Etchmiadzin Cathedral in Vagharshapat
Muslim men praying at the Ortaköy Mosque in Istanbul
Buddhist Monks performing traditional Sand mandala made from coloured sand

Earth's largest and most populous continent, located primarily in the Eastern and Northern Hemispheres.

- Asia

55 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Statue representing Europa at Palazzo Ferreria, in Valletta, Malta

Europe

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Landmass, which is either considered a continent in its own right or a subcontinent of Eurasia, located entirely in the Northern Hemisphere and mostly in the Eastern Hemisphere.

Landmass, which is either considered a continent in its own right or a subcontinent of Eurasia, located entirely in the Northern Hemisphere and mostly in the Eastern Hemisphere.

Statue representing Europa at Palazzo Ferreria, in Valletta, Malta
First map of the world according to Anaximander (6th century BC)
A medieval T and O map printed by Günther Zainer in 1472, showing the three continents as domains of the sons of Noah — Asia to Sem (Shem), Europe to Iafeth (Japheth) and Africa to Cham (Ham)
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A New Map of Europe According to the Newest Observations (1721) by Hermann Moll draws the eastern boundary of Europe along the Don River flowing south-west and the Tobol, Irtysh and Ob rivers flowing north
1916 political map of Europe showing most of Moll's waterways replaced by von Strahlenberg's Ural Mountains and Freshfield's Caucasus Crest, land features of a type that normally defines a subcontinent
Paleolithic cave paintings from Lascaux in France ( 15,000 BCE)
Stonehenge in the United Kingdom (Late Neolithic from 3000 to 2000 BCE).
The Parthenon in Athens (432 BCE)
Animation showing the growth and division of the Roman Empire (years CE)
Viking raids and division of the Frankish Empire at the Treaty of Verdun in 843
The maritime republics of medieval Italy reestablished contacts between Europe, Asia and Africa with extensive trade networks and colonies across the Mediterranean, and had an essential role in the Crusades.
Tancred of Sicily and Philip II of France, during the Third Crusade (1189–1192)
The sacking of Suzdal by Batu Khan in 1238, during the Mongol invasion of Europe.
The School of Athens by Raphael (1511): Contemporaries, such as Michelangelo and Leonardo da Vinci (centre), are portrayed as classical scholars of the Renaissance.
Habsburg dominions in the centuries following their partition by Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor. The principal military base of Philip II in Europe was the Spanish road stretching from the Netherlands to the Duchy of Milan.
The national boundaries within Europe set by the Congress of Vienna
Marshall's Temple Works (1840), the Industrial Revolution started in Great Britain
Map of European colonial empires throughout the world in 1914.
Map depicting the military alliances of World War I in 1914–1918
Serbian war efforts (1914–1918) cost the country one quarter of its population.
Nazi Germany began a devastating World War II in Europe by its leader, Adolf Hitler. Here Hitler, on the right, with his closest ally, the Italian dictator Benito Mussolini, in 1940
Bombed and burned-out buildings in Hamburg, 1944/45
The "Big Three" at the Yalta Conference in 1945; seated (from the left): Winston Churchill, Franklin D. Roosevelt and Joseph Stalin
The Schuman Declaration led to the creation of the European Coal and Steel Community. It began the integration process of the European Union (9 May 1950, at the French Foreign Ministry).
Flag of Europe, adopted by the Council of Europe in 1955 as the flag for the whole of Europe
Map of populous Europe and surrounding regions showing physical, political and population characteristics, as per 2018
Köppen-Geiger climate classification map for Europe.
The Volga, as seen in Yaroslavl. It flows from Central Russia and into the Caspian Sea and is the longest river in Europe.
Mount Elbrus in Southern Russia, is the highest mountain in Europe.
Europa Point as seen from the Strait of Gibraltar, which separates the continents of Europe and Africa, also being between the Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea.
The Danube, as seen in Đerdap National Park. It flows from the Black Forest and into the Black Sea and is the second-longest river in Europe, which also passes through the largest number of countries in the world at 10.
Sutjeska National Park contains Perućica, which is one of the last remaining primeval forests in Europe.
Land use map of Europe with arable farmland (yellow), forest (dark green), pasture (light green) and tundra, or bogs, in the north (dark yellow)
Floristic regions of Europe and neighbouring areas, according to Wolfgang Frey and Rainer Lösch
Biogeographic regions of Europe and bordering regions
A brown bear near the Russian border in the forests of Kainuu, Finland
Once roaming the great temperate forests of Eurasia, European bison now live in nature preserves in Białowieża Forest, on the border between Poland and Belarus.
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Fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989.
Eurozone (blue colour)
One of Kosovo's main economical sources is mining, because it has large reserves of lead, zinc, silver, nickel, cobalt, copper, iron and bauxite. Miners at the Trepča Mines in Mitrovica, Kosovo in 2011.
Population growth in and around Europe in 2021
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Map purportedly displaying the European continent split along cultural and state borders as proposed by the German organization Ständiger Ausschuss für geographische Namen (StAGN).
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Tallinn, the medieval capital of Estonia in the Baltic States, is a mixture of Western and Eastern architectural cultures.
Surficial geology of Europe

Comprising the westernmost peninsulas of Eurasia, it shares the continental landmass of Afro-Eurasia with both Asia and Africa.

The location of the Black Sea

Black Sea

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The location of the Black Sea
The estuary of the Veleka in the Black Sea. Longshore drift has deposited sediment along the shoreline which has led to the formation of a spit. Sinemorets, Bulgaria
Black Sea coast of western Georgia, with the skyline of Batumi on the horizon
Swallow's Nest in Crimea
Coastline of Samsun in Turkey
A sanatorium in Sochi, Russia
Coast of the Black Sea at Ordu
Kapchik Cape in Crimea
The Black Sea near Constanța, Romania
Ice on the Gulf of Odessa
The bay of Sudak, Crimea
The Yavuz Sultan Selim Bridge in Istanbul, Turkey, crosses the Bosporus strait near its entrance to the Black Sea. Connecting Europe and Asia, it is one of the tallest suspension bridges in the world.
This SeaWiFS view reveals the colorful interplay of currents on the sea's surface.
Black Sea coast in Ordu, Turkey
The port of Poti, Georgia
Phytoplankton blooms and plumes of sediment form the bright blue swirls that ring the Black Sea in this 2004 image.
The Bosporus, taken from the International Space Station
Map of the Dardanelles
A 16th-century map of the Black Sea by Diogo Homem
Greek colonies (8th–3rd century BCE) of the Black Sea (Euxine, or "hospitable" sea)
Ivan Aivazovsky. Black Sea Fleet in the Bay of Theodosia, just before the Crimean War
Yalta, Crimea
Amasra, Turkey, is located on a small island in the Black Sea.
Black Sea beach in Zatoka, Ukraine
Soviet frigate Bezzavetny (right) bumping the USS Yorktown during the 1988 Black Sea bumping incident
Ukrainian Navy artillery boat U170 in the Bay of Sevastopol
Jellyfish
Actinia
Actinia
Goby
Stingray
Goat fish
Hermit crab, Diogenes pugilator
Blue sponge
Spiny dogfish
Seahorse
Black Sea common dolphins with a kite-surfer off Sochi

The Black Sea is a marginal mediterranean sea of the Atlantic Ocean lying between Europe and Asia, east of the Balkans, south of the East European Plain, west of the Caucasus, and north of Anatolia.

Animated, colour-coded map showing the various continents. Depending on the convention and model, some continents may be consolidated or subdivided: for example, Eurasia is most often subdivided into Asia and Europe (red shades), while North and South America are sometimes recognised as one American continent (green shades)

Continent

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Any of several large landmasses.

Any of several large landmasses.

Animated, colour-coded map showing the various continents. Depending on the convention and model, some continents may be consolidated or subdivided: for example, Eurasia is most often subdivided into Asia and Europe (red shades), while North and South America are sometimes recognised as one American continent (green shades)
Map of island countries: these states are often grouped geographically with a neighbouring continental landmass
Reconstruction of the supercontinent Pangaea approximately 200 million years ago.
The Indian subcontinent
The Ancient Greek geographer Strabo holding a globe showing Europa and Asia
Medieval T and O map showing the three continents as domains of the sons of Noah—Asia to Sem (Shem), Europe to Iafeth (Japheth), and Africa to Cham (Ham).
Universalis Cosmographia, Waldseemüller's 1507 world map—the first to show the Americas separate from Asia
Hollandia Nova, 1659 map prepared by Joan Blaeu based on voyages by Abel Tasman and Willem Jansz, this image shows a French edition of 1663
Principal tectonic plates of the continents and the floor of the oceans

Ordered from largest in area to smallest, these seven regions are: Asia, Africa, North America, South America, Antarctica, Europe, and Australia.

Oceania

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Geographical region that includes Australasia, Melanesia, Micronesia, and Polynesia.

Geographical region that includes Australasia, Melanesia, Micronesia, and Polynesia.

Ethnocultural subregions of Oceania.
A German map of Oceania from 1884, showing the region to encompass Australia and all islands between Asia and Latin America.
A map of member states for the Pacific Islands Forum (PIF), the member states are depicted in blue. The PIF is a governing organization for the Pacific, and all of its members are politically within Oceania. Territories geographically associated with Oceania, but not politically associated with Oceania, such as Easter Island, Hawaii and Western New Guinea, have considered gaining representation in the PIF.
An exclusive economic zone map of the Pacific which includes territories not politically associated with Oceania, that may be considered geographically or geologically within Oceania.
A 19th-century engraving of an Aboriginal Australian encampment
Stone money transport to Yap Island in Micronesia (1880)
Chronological dispersal of Austronesian people across the Pacific (per Bellwood in Chambers, 2008)
Moai at Ahu Tongariki on Rapa Nui (Easter Island)
1852 map of Oceania by J. G. Barbié du Bocage. Includes regions of Polynesia, Micronesia, Melanesia and Malesia.
New Guinea from 1884 to 1919. The Netherlands controlled the western half of New Guinea, Germany the north-eastern part, and Britain the south-eastern part.
New Zealand troops land on Vella Lavella, in Solomon Islands.
Aoraki / Mount Cook, located on the South Island of New Zealand
Puncak Jaya / Carstensz Pyramid, highest summit in Oceania
A map of Oceania from the CIA World Factbook
Exclusive economic zones of Pacific states and territories
The Pacific Plate comprises most of Oceania, excluding Australasia and the western portion of Melanesia.
New Zealand countryside
Uluru (Ayers Rock) in Central Australia
The Pacific robin inhabits the islands of the south western Pacific.
August 2011 winter's snowfall in Dunedin, Otago
Saione, the church of the King, a Free Wesleyan Church in Kolomotuʻa, Tonga. Especially British and American missionaries brought various Protestant denominations to Oceania.
Many Portuguese immigrants in Hawaii were Azorean or Madeiran.
The skyline of Sydney
Auckland's central business district at night.
Honolulu viewed from Diamond Head crater
Shangri-La's Fijian Resort
Dandenong Ranges in Victoria are popular among tourists.
Elizabeth is Head of the Commonwealth and Queen of five Oceanian countries: Australia, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands and Tuvalu.
Government building in the Samoan capital Apia housing administrative ministerial offices.
On 28 June 2007, the Sydney Opera House became a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
The Iolani Palace in Honolulu, formerly the residence of the Hawaiian monarch, was restored and opened to the public as a museum in 1978.
The Hobbiton Movie Set, located near Matamata, was used for The Lord of the Rings film trilogy.
A fale on Manono Island
Gwion Gwion rock paintings found in the north-west Kimberley region of Western Australia
Fiji playing Wales at seven-a-side rugby

The broadest definition of Oceania encompasses the many islands between mainland Asia and the Americas; The island nation of Australia is the only piece of land in the area which is large enough to be considered a continent.

Extent of the Indian Ocean according to International Hydrographic Organization

Indian Ocean

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Third-largest of the world's five oceanic divisions, covering 70560000 km2 or ~19.8% of the water on Earth's surface.

Third-largest of the world's five oceanic divisions, covering 70560000 km2 or ~19.8% of the water on Earth's surface.

Extent of the Indian Ocean according to International Hydrographic Organization
The Indian Ocean, according to the CIA The World Factbook (blue area), and as defined by the IHO (black outline - excluding marginal waterbodies).
During summer, warm continental masses draw moist air from the Indian Ocean hence producing heavy rainfall. The process is reversed during winter, resulting in dry conditions.
Air pollution in South Asia spread over the Bay of Bengal and beyond.
Madagascar's Elephant bird, Mauritius's Dodo bird and ostrich (from left to right)
According to the Coastal hypothesis, modern humans spread from Africa along the northern rim of the Indian Ocean.
The Austronesian maritime trade network was the first trade routes in the Indian Ocean.
Greco-Roman trade with ancient India according to the Periplus Maris Erythraei 1st century CE
The economically important Silk Road was blocked from Europe by the Ottoman Empire in c. undefined 1453 with the fall of the Byzantine Empire. This spurred exploration, and a new sea route around Africa was found, triggering the Age of Discovery.
For most of the 16th century, the Portuguese dominated the Indian Ocean trade.
Malé's population has increased from 20,000 people in 1987 to more than 220,000 people in 2020.
An unnamed Chagossian on Diego Garcia in 1971 shortly before the British expelled the islanders when the island became a U.S. military base. The man spoke a French-based creole language and his ancestors were most likely brought to the uninhabited island as slaves in the 19th century.
Major ocean trade routes in the world includes the northern Indian Ocean.
Mombasa Port on Kenya's Indian Ocean coast

It is bounded by Asia to the north, Africa to the west and Australia to the east.

Eurasia

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The boundary of the 13th century Mongol Empire and location of today's Mongols in modern Mongolia, Russia and China.
Single markets in European and post-Soviet countries; European Economic Area and Common Economic Space
ASEM Partners
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Area from Lisbon to Vladivostok with all European and CIS countries
Physical map of Asia
Changes in national boundaries after the collapse of the Eastern Bloc

Eurasia is the largest continental area on Earth, comprising all of Europe and Asia.

The location of the Aegean Sea

Aegean Sea

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The location of the Aegean Sea
The extent of the Aegean Sea on a map of the Mediterranean Sea
A panoramic view of the Santorini caldera, taken from Oia.
A traditional street in Lefkes, Paros-Greece.
Climate map of Greece. Most of the landmass surrounding the Aegean sea is classified as Csa, with the northern region being BSk.
Female figure from Naxos (2800-2300 BC)
A fleet of Athenian trireme
Library of Celsus, a Roman structure in important sea port Ephesus
Emirate of Crete, after early conquest of Arabs
A 1528 map of the Aegean Sea by Turkish geographer Piri Reis
German Tanks in Rhodes during the WW2
House of Cleopatra on Delos
Walls of Troy
The town of Mykonos, part of the Cyclades
Tourists in the town of Mykonos, part of the Cyclades

The Aegean Sea (Greek: Αιγαίο Πέλαγος: "Egéo Pélagos", Turkish: "Ege Denizi" or "Adalar Denizi") is an elongated embayment of the Mediterranean Sea between Europe and Asia.

The totality of Africa seen by the Apollo 17 crew

Africa

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The totality of Africa seen by the Apollo 17 crew
Lucy, an Australopithecus afarensis skeleton discovered 24 November 1974 in the Awash Valley of Ethiopia's Afar Depression
Saharan rock art in the Fezzan
Diachronic map showing African empires spanning roughly 500 BCE to 1500 CE
The Ezana Stone records King Ezana's conversion to Christianity and his subjugation of various neighboring peoples, including Meroë.
The intricate 9th-century bronzes from Igbo-Ukwu, in Nigeria displayed a level of technical accomplishment that was notably more advanced than European bronze casting of the same period.
Ruins of Great Zimbabwe (flourished eleventh to fifteenth centuries)
Major slave trading regions of Africa, 15th–19th centuries.
Comparison of Africa in the years 1880 and 1913
Topography of Africa
Today, the African Plate is moving over Earth's surface at a speed of 0.292° ± 0.007° per million years, relative to the "average" Earth (NNR-MORVEL56)
The main biomes in Africa.
Africa Water Precipitation
Savanna at Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Tanzania
African countries by GDP (PPP) per capita in 2020
A map showing religious distribution in Africa
A simplistic view of language families spoken in Africa
The rock-hewn Church of Saint George in Lalibela, Ethiopia is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
Nok figure (5th century BC-5th century AD)
A musician from South Africa
Best results of African men's national football teams at the FIFA World Cup
An animated map shows the order of independence of African nations, 1950–2011
Africa's wars and conflicts, 1980–96 {{legend|#cc4c02|Major Wars/Conflict (100,000 + Casualties)}}{{legend|#fe9929|Minor Wars/Conflict}}{{legend|#fed98e|Other Conflicts}}
Political map of Africa in 2021
Map of the African Economic Community.
CEN-SAD
COMESA
EAC
ECCAS
ECOWAS
IGAD
SADC
UMA

Africa is the world's second-largest and second-most populous continent, after Asia in both cases.

Pacific Ocean

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Largest and deepest of Earth's five oceanic divisions.

Largest and deepest of Earth's five oceanic divisions.

Partial picture of the Pacific Ocean from space, by the Apollo 11 crew
Model of a Fijian drua, an example of an Austronesian vessel with a double-canoe (catamaran) hull and a crab claw sail
Map showing the migration of the Austronesian peoples, the first seaborne human migration in history (c.3000-1500 BCE)
Map showing a large number of Spanish expeditions across the Pacific Ocean from the 16th to 18th centuries including the Manila galleon route between Acapulco and Manila, the first transpacific trade route in history.
Universalis Cosmographia, the Waldseemüller map dated 1507, from a time when the nature of the Americas was ambiguous, particularly North America, as a possible part of Asia, was the first map to show the Americas separating two distinct oceans. South America was generally considered a "new world" and shows the name "America" for the first time, after Amerigo Vespucci
The bathyscaphe Trieste, before her record dive to the bottom of the Mariana Trench, 23 January 1960
Abel Aubert du Petit-Thouars taking over Tahiti on 9 September 1842
Sunset over the Pacific Ocean as seen from the International Space Station. tops of thunderclouds are also visible.
The island geography of the Pacific Ocean Basin
Regions, island nations and territories of Oceania
Tarawa Atoll in the Republic of Kiribati
Sunset in Monterey County, California, U.S.
Impact of El Niño and La Niña on North America
Typhoon Tip at global peak intensity on 12 October 1979
Ring of Fire. The Pacific is ringed by many volcanoes and oceanic trenches.
Ulawun stratovolcano situated on the island of New Britain, Papua New Guinea
Mount Saint Helens in 2020
Pacific Ocean currents have created 3 "islands" of debris.
Marine debris on a Hawaiian coast
Prime Minister Suga declined to drink the bottle of Fukushima's treated radioactive water that he was holding, which would otherwise be discharged to the Pacific. 2020.
Made in 1529, the Diogo Ribeiro map was the first to show the Pacific at about its proper size
Map of the Pacific Ocean during European Exploration, circa 1754.
Maris Pacifici by Ortelius (1589). One of the first printed maps to show the Pacific Ocean<ref>{{cite web|url=https://www.loc.gov/item/prn-01-093/|title=Library Acquires Copy of 1507 Waldseemüller World Map – News Releases (Library of Congress)|publisher=Loc.gov|access-date=April 20, 2013}}</ref>
Map of the Pacific Ocean during European Exploration, circa 1702–1707
Ladrilleros Beach in Colombia on the coast of Chocó natural region
Tahuna maru islet, French Polynesia
Los Molinos on the coast of Southern Chile

It extends from the Arctic Ocean in the north to the Southern Ocean (or, depending on definition, to Antarctica) in the south, and is bounded by the continents of Asia and Australia in the west and the Americas in the east.

Anatolia

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Europe during the Last Glacial Maximum, c. 20,000 years ago. Anatolia was connected to the European mainland until c. 5600 BCE, when the melting ice sheets caused the sea level in the Mediterranean to rise around 120 m,  triggering the formation of the Turkish Straits.   As a result, two former lakes (the Sea of Marmara and the Black Sea) were connected to the Mediterranean Sea, which separated Anatolia from Europe.
Göbeklitepe were erected as far back as 9600 BC.
The Sphinx Gate at Hattusha
The Sebasteion of Aphrodisias of Caria
Fairy chimneys in Cappadocia.
Aphrodisias was inscribed on the UNESCO World Heritage Site List in 2017
Sanctuary of Commagene Kings on Mount Nemrut (1st century BCE)
Byzantine Anatolia and the Byzantine-Arab frontier zone in the mid-9th century
Salty shores of Lake Tuz.
Mediterranean climate is dominant in Turkish Riviera
Ankara (central Anatolia)
Antalya (southern Anatolia)
Van (eastern Anatolia)

Anatolia, also known as Asia Minor, is a large peninsula in Western Asia and the westernmost protrusion of the Asian continent.