Aspects of the Theory of Syntax

Aspects of the Theory of Syntax (known in linguistic circles simply as Aspects ) is a book on linguistics written by American linguist Noam Chomsky, first published in 1965.wikipedia
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Transformational grammar

transformational generative grammartransformationaltransformational-generative grammar
In Aspects, Chomsky presented a deeper, more extensive reformulation of transformational generative grammar (TGG), a new kind of syntactic theory that he had introduced in the 1950s with the publication of his first book, Syntactic Structures.
Noam Chomsky's 1965 book Aspects of the Theory of Syntax developed the idea that each sentence in a language has two levels of representation: a deep structure and a surface structure.

Noam Chomsky

ChomskyChomsky, NoamChomskyan
Aspects of the Theory of Syntax (known in linguistic circles simply as Aspects ) is a book on linguistics written by American linguist Noam Chomsky, first published in 1965.
Chomsky continued to publish his linguistic ideas throughout the decade, including in Aspects of the Theory of Syntax (1965), Topics in the Theory of Generative Grammar (1966), and Cartesian Linguistics: A Chapter in the History of Rationalist Thought (1966).

Syntactic Structures

his previous worksyntax
In Aspects, Chomsky presented a deeper, more extensive reformulation of transformational generative grammar (TGG), a new kind of syntactic theory that he had introduced in the 1950s with the publication of his first book, Syntactic Structures. After the publication of Chomsky's Syntactic Structures, the nature of linguistic research began to change, especially at MIT and elsewhere in the linguistic community where TGG had a favorable reception.

Subcategorization

subcategorization framesubcategorizesubcategorized
In Chapter 2 of Aspects, Chomsky discusses the problem of subcategorization of lexical categories and how this information should be captured in a generalized manner in the grammar.

Generative semantics

generative semanticiansgenerative semanticistsinterpretative and generative semantics
As a response to these problems encountered within the Standard Theory, a new approach called the Generative semantics (as opposed to the interpretive semantics in Aspects) was invented in the early 1970s by some of Chomsky's collaborators (notably George Lakoff ), and was incorporated later in the late 1980s into what is now known as the school of Cognitive linguistics, at odds with Chomskyan school of Generative linguistics.

Linguistics

linguistlinguisticlinguists
Aspects of the Theory of Syntax (known in linguistic circles simply as Aspects ) is a book on linguistics written by American linguist Noam Chomsky, first published in 1965.

Syntax

syntacticsyntacticalsyntactically
In Aspects, Chomsky presented a deeper, more extensive reformulation of transformational generative grammar (TGG), a new kind of syntactic theory that he had introduced in the 1950s with the publication of his first book, Syntactic Structures.

Outline of physical science

physical sciencesphysical sciencephysical
It presented Chomsky's epistemological assumptions with a view to establishing linguistic theory-making as a formal (i.e. based on the manipulation of symbols and rules) discipline comparable to physical sciences, i.e. a domain of inquiry well-defined in its nature and scope.

Behaviorism

behavioristbehaviourismbehavior analysis
From a philosophical perspective, it directed mainstream linguistic research away from behaviorism, constructivism, empiricism and structuralism and towards mentalism, nativism, rationalism and generativism, respectively, taking as its main object of study the abstract, inner workings of the human mind related to language acquisition and production.

Constructivism (philosophy of education)

constructivismconstructivistConstructivism (learning theory)
From a philosophical perspective, it directed mainstream linguistic research away from behaviorism, constructivism, empiricism and structuralism and towards mentalism, nativism, rationalism and generativism, respectively, taking as its main object of study the abstract, inner workings of the human mind related to language acquisition and production.

Empiricism

empiricistempiricalempirically
From a philosophical perspective, it directed mainstream linguistic research away from behaviorism, constructivism, empiricism and structuralism and towards mentalism, nativism, rationalism and generativism, respectively, taking as its main object of study the abstract, inner workings of the human mind related to language acquisition and production.

Structural linguistics

structuraliststructuralismstructural
From a philosophical perspective, it directed mainstream linguistic research away from behaviorism, constructivism, empiricism and structuralism and towards mentalism, nativism, rationalism and generativism, respectively, taking as its main object of study the abstract, inner workings of the human mind related to language acquisition and production.

Mentalism (psychology)

mentalisticmentalismcognitive elements
From a philosophical perspective, it directed mainstream linguistic research away from behaviorism, constructivism, empiricism and structuralism and towards mentalism, nativism, rationalism and generativism, respectively, taking as its main object of study the abstract, inner workings of the human mind related to language acquisition and production.

Universal grammar

linguistic nativismnativismuniversal
From a philosophical perspective, it directed mainstream linguistic research away from behaviorism, constructivism, empiricism and structuralism and towards mentalism, nativism, rationalism and generativism, respectively, taking as its main object of study the abstract, inner workings of the human mind related to language acquisition and production.

Rationalism

rationalistrationalistsrationalistic
From a philosophical perspective, it directed mainstream linguistic research away from behaviorism, constructivism, empiricism and structuralism and towards mentalism, nativism, rationalism and generativism, respectively, taking as its main object of study the abstract, inner workings of the human mind related to language acquisition and production.

Language acquisition

language learningfirst language acquisitionacquisition
From a philosophical perspective, it directed mainstream linguistic research away from behaviorism, constructivism, empiricism and structuralism and towards mentalism, nativism, rationalism and generativism, respectively, taking as its main object of study the abstract, inner workings of the human mind related to language acquisition and production.

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

MITM.I.T.Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)
After the publication of Chomsky's Syntactic Structures, the nature of linguistic research began to change, especially at MIT and elsewhere in the linguistic community where TGG had a favorable reception. Morris Halle, a student of Roman Jacobson and a colleague of Chomsky at MIT's Research Laboratory of Electronics (RLE), was a strong supporter of Chomsky's ideas of TGG.

Morris Halle

HalleHalle, MorrisMoriss Halle
Morris Halle, a student of Roman Jacobson and a colleague of Chomsky at MIT's Research Laboratory of Electronics (RLE), was a strong supporter of Chomsky's ideas of TGG.

Roman Jakobson

JakobsonRoman JacobsonJakobson, Roman Osipovich
Morris Halle, a student of Roman Jacobson and a colleague of Chomsky at MIT's Research Laboratory of Electronics (RLE), was a strong supporter of Chomsky's ideas of TGG.

Research Laboratory of Electronics at MIT

Research Laboratory of ElectronicsRLELaboratory for Electronics
Morris Halle, a student of Roman Jacobson and a colleague of Chomsky at MIT's Research Laboratory of Electronics (RLE), was a strong supporter of Chomsky's ideas of TGG.

Fred Lukoff

LukoffLukoff, Fred
From 1956 until 1968, together with Chomsky (and also with Fred Lukoff initially), Halle developed a new theory of phonology called generative phonology.

The Sound Pattern of English

Chomskylinear phonologySound pattern of English
Their collaboration culminated with the publication of The Sound Pattern of English in 1968.

Robert Lees (linguist)

Robert LeesLees, RobertRobert B. Lees
Robert Lees, a linguist of the traditional structuralist school, went to MIT in 1956 to work in the mechanical translation project at RLE, but became convinced by Chomsky's TGG approach and went on to publish, in 1960, probably the very first book of a linguistic analysis based on TGG entitled The Grammar of English Nominalizations.

Translation project

Robert Lees, a linguist of the traditional structuralist school, went to MIT in 1956 to work in the mechanical translation project at RLE, but became convinced by Chomsky's TGG approach and went on to publish, in 1960, probably the very first book of a linguistic analysis based on TGG entitled The Grammar of English Nominalizations.

Edward Klima

Edward S. KlimaKlima, EdwardKlima, Edward S.
Edward S. Klima, a graduate of the Masters program from Harvard and hired by Chomsky at RLE in 1957, produced pioneering TGG-based work on negation.