Asphalt

bitumenbituminoustarmactarmackedasphalt baseasphaltsbituminous pavementoiledtar tarmac
Note: The terms bitumen and asphalt are mostly interchangeable, except where asphalt is used as a shorthand for asphalt concrete.wikipedia
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Bituminous waterproofing

dakleerroofing feltfelt paper
Its other main uses are for bituminous waterproofing products, including production of roofing felt and for sealing flat roofs.
Bitumen (asphalt or coal-tar pitch) is a mixed substance made up of organic liquids that are highly sticky, viscous, and waterproof.

Road surface

pavedpavementpaving
The primary use (70%) of asphalt is in road construction, where it is used as the glue or binder mixed with aggregate particles to create asphalt concrete.
In the past, gravel road surfaces, cobblestone and granite setts were extensively used, but these surfaces have mostly been replaced by asphalt or concrete laid on a compacted base course.

Athabasca oil sands

Alberta oil sandsoil sandsAthabasca tar sands
The Canadian province of Alberta has most of the world's reserves of natural asphalt in the Athabasca oil sands, which cover 142000 km2, an area larger than England. The world's largest deposit of natural bitumen, known as the Athabasca oil sands, is located in the McMurray Formation of Northern Alberta.
The Athabasca oil sands, also known as the Athabasca tar sands, are large deposits of bitumen or extremely heavy crude oil, located in northeastern Alberta, Canada – roughly centred on the boomtown of Fort McMurray.

La Brea Tar Pits

George C. Page MuseumPage MuseumLa Brea
Common colloquial usage often refers to various forms of asphalt as "tar", as in the name of the La Brea Tar Pits. Natural seeps occur in the La Brea Tar Pits and in the Dead Sea.
Natural asphalt (also called asphaltum, bitumen, pitch, or tar—brea in Spanish) has seeped up from the ground in this area for tens of thousands of years.

Petroleum

crude oiloilcrude
Asphalt, also known as bitumen, is a sticky, black, and highly viscous liquid or semi-solid form of petroleum.
It is refined and separated, most easily by distillation, into numerous consumer products, from gasoline (petrol) and kerosene to asphalt and chemical reagents used to make plastics, pesticides and pharmaceuticals.

Oil sands

tar sandsoil sandoilsand
The oil sands of Alberta, Canada are a similar material.
Oil sands are either loose sands or partially consolidated sandstone containing a naturally occurring mixture of sand, clay, and water, saturated with a dense and extremely viscous form of petroleum technically referred to as bitumen (or colloquially as tar due to its superficially similar appearance).

Pitch (resin)

pitchpitch resinpitched
It may be found in natural deposits or may be a refined product, and is classed as a pitch.
Various forms of pitch may also be called tar, bitumen, or asphalt.

Upgrader

upgradedupgrading plantupgrading
Diluted bitumen (diluted with naphtha to make it flow in pipelines) is known as "dilbit" in the Canadian petroleum industry, while bitumen "upgraded" to synthetic crude oil is known as "syncrude", and syncrude blended with bitumen is called "synbit".
An upgrader is a facility that upgrades bitumen (extra heavy oil) into synthetic crude oil.

Diagenesis

diageneticdiageneticallylithified
The majority of bitumen, on the other hand, was formed naturally when vast quantities of organic animal materials were deposited by water and buried hundreds of metres deep at the diagenetic point, where the disorganized fatty hydrocarbon molecules joined together in long chains in the absence of oxygen.
As the rock is carried deeper by further deposition above, its organic content is transformed into kerogens and bitumens.

Pitch Lake

Tierra de BreaTrinidad lake asphalt
"Pitch" is another term sometimes informally used at times to refer to asphalt, as in Pitch Lake.
The Pitch Lake is the largest natural deposit of asphalt in the world, estimated to contain 10 million tons.

Tar

wood tartar kilnTars
Common colloquial usage often refers to various forms of asphalt as "tar", as in the name of the La Brea Tar Pits. Neither of the terms "asphalt" or "bitumen" should be confused with tar or coal tars.
"Tar" and "pitch" can be used interchangeably; asphalt (naturally occurring pitch) may also be called either "mineral tar" or "mineral pitch".

Maltenes

It is commonly modelled as a colloid, with asphaltenes as the dispersed phase and maltenes as the continuous phase.
Maltenes are the n-alkane (pentane or heptane)-soluble molecular components of asphalt, which is the residue remaining after petroleum refiners remove other useful derivatives such as gasoline and kerosene from crude oil.

Petroleum seep

oil seepseepsoil seeps
Natural seeps occur in the La Brea Tar Pits and in the Dead Sea.
Natural products associated with these seeps include bitumen, pitch, asphalt and tar.

Oil refinery

oil refineriesrefineryoil refining
Although historically it was used without refining to pave roads, nearly all of the output is now used as raw material for oil refineries in Canada and the United States.
An oil refinery or petroleum refinery is an industrial process plant where crude oil is transformed and refined into more useful products such as petroleum naphtha, gasoline, diesel fuel, asphalt base, heating oil, kerosene, liquefied petroleum gas, jet fuel and fuel oils.

Asphaltene

asphaltenesAsphaltics
It is commonly modelled as a colloid, with asphaltenes as the dispersed phase and maltenes as the continuous phase.
The word "asphaltene" was coined by Boussingault in 1837 when he noticed that the distillation residue of some bitumens had asphalt-like properties.

Steam-assisted gravity drainage

steam assisted gravity drainageSAGDsteam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD)
The other 80% has to be produced by oil wells using enhanced oil recovery techniques like steam-assisted gravity drainage.
Steam-assisted gravity drainage (SAGD; "Sag-D") is an enhanced oil recovery technology for producing heavy crude oil and bitumen.

Coal gas

town gasgascoal-gas
During the early and mid-20th century, when town gas was produced, coal tar was a readily available byproduct and extensively used as the binder for road aggregates.
Gas works would typically use oily bituminous coals as feedstock.

Gilsonite

asphaltumasphaltiteasphalt
An example of this is within the Uinta Basin of Utah, in the US, where there is a swarm of laterally and vertically extensive veins composed of a solid hydrocarbon termed Gilsonite.
Gilsonite (also known as uintahite, asphaltum or asphaltite) is a naturally occurring soluble solid hydrocarbon, a form of asphalt (or bitumen) with a relatively high melting temperature.

Adhesive

glueadhesivescontact cement
The use of natural bitumen for waterproofing, and as an adhesive dates at least to the fifth millennium BC, with a crop storage basket discovered in Mehrgarh, of the Indus Valley Civilization, lined with it.
Another investigation by archaeologists uncovered the use of bituminous cements to fasten ivory eyeballs to statues in Babylonian temples dating to approximately 4000 BC.

McMurray Formation

The world's largest deposit of natural bitumen, known as the Athabasca oil sands, is located in the McMurray Formation of Northern Alberta.
It is a well-studied example of fluvial to estuarine sedimentation, and it is economically important because it hosts most of the vast bitumen resources of the Athabasca Oil Sands region.

Coal tar

tarcoal tar pitchcoal-tar
Neither of the terms "asphalt" or "bitumen" should be confused with tar or coal tars.
These sealers are used to extend the life and reduce maintenance cost associated with asphalt pavements, primarily in asphalt road paving, car parks and walkways.

Mortar (masonry)

mortarmortaredmortars
In the ancient Middle East, the Sumerians used natural bitumen deposits for mortar between bricks and stones, to cement parts of carvings, such as eyes, into place, for ship caulking, and for waterproofing.
In its broadest sense, mortar includes pitch, asphalt, and soft mud or clay, such as used between mud bricks.

Mummy

mummiesmummifiedmummification
The Persian word for asphalt is moom, which is related to the English word mummy.
The English word mummy is derived from medieval Latin mumia, a borrowing of the medieval Arabic word mūmiya and from a Persian word mūm (wax), which meant an embalmed corpse, and as well as the bituminous embalming substance, and also meant "bitumen".

Carbon disulfide

carbon disulphideCS 2 carbon bisulphide
The substance is soluble in carbon disulfide.
Carbon disulfide is a solvent for phosphorus, sulfur, selenium, bromine, iodine, fats, resins, rubber, and asphalt.

Dead Sea

The Dead SeaSalt SeaDead Sea Panorama Complex
Natural seeps occur in the La Brea Tar Pits and in the Dead Sea.
An unusual feature of the Dead Sea is its discharge of asphalt.