Asphyxia

asphyxiationsuffocationsuffocatedasphyxiatedoxygen deprivationsuffocateasphyxiatecompressive asphyxiasmotheredsuffocating
Asphyxia or asphyxiation is a condition of deficient supply of oxygen to the body that arises from abnormal breathing.wikipedia
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Choking

chokedHeimlich Maneuverchoke
An example of asphyxia is choking.
Insufficient oxygen being delivered to the body will result in oxygen deprivation.

Drowning

drowneddrowndrowns
Drowning is defined as respiratory impairment as a result of being in or under a liquid.

Pulmonary agent

chokingchoking agent
They operate by causing a build-up of fluids in the lungs, which then leads to suffocation.

Inert gas asphyxiation

controlled atmosphere killingControlled-atmosphere killingnitrogen hypoxia
Inert gas asphyxiation is a form of asphyxiation which results from breathing a physiologically inert gas in the absence of oxygen, or a low amount of oxygen, rather than atmospheric air (which is largely composed of nitrogen and oxygen).

Hanging

hangedhangdeath by hanging
In the absence of fracture and dislocation, occlusion of blood vessels becomes the major cause of death, rather than asphyxiation.

Sudden infant death syndrome

SIDScot deathcrib death
One example is overlay, in which an adult accidentally rolls over onto an infant during co-sleeping, an accident that often goes unnoticed and is mistakenly thought to be sudden infant death syndrome.
While child abuse in the form of intentional suffocation may be misdiagnosed as SIDS, this is believed to make up less than 5% of cases.

Central hypoventilation syndrome

Congenital central hypoventilation syndromeOndine's curseacquired central hypoventilation syndrome
CHS is exhibited typically as a congenital disorder, but in rare circumstances, can also result from severe brain or spinal trauma or injury (such as after an automobile accident, stroke, asphyxiation, brain tumor, encephalitis, poisoning, as a complication of neurosurgery) or due to particular neurodegenerative conditions such as Parkinson's disease, multiple system atrophy, or multiple sclerosis.

Stampede

human crushhuman stampedecrowd crush
In fatal crowd disasters, compressive asphyxia from being crushed against the crowd causes the large part of the deaths, rather than blunt trauma from trampling.
Unable to draw breath, individuals in a crowd can also be crushed while standing.

Hillsborough disaster

HillsboroughHillsborough Independent PanelHillsborough football disaster
This is what occurred at the Ibrox disaster in 1971, where 66 Rangers fans died; the 1979 The Who concert disaster where 11 died; the Luzhniki disaster in 1982, when 66 FC Spartak Moscow fans died; and at the Hillsborough disaster in 1989, 96 Liverpool fans were crushed to death in an overcrowded terrace, 95 of the 96 victims died from compressive asphyxia, with 93 dying directly from it and 2 others dying from related complications.
Those still trapped in the pens were packed so tightly that many victims died of compressive asphyxia while standing.

Co-sleeping

bed sharingbed-sharingcosleep
One example is overlay, in which an adult accidentally rolls over onto an infant during co-sleeping, an accident that often goes unnoticed and is mistakenly thought to be sudden infant death syndrome.
They also cite concerns that a parent may smother the child or promote an unhealthy dependence of the child on the parent(s).

Luzhniki disaster

disaster struckdisaster
This is what occurred at the Ibrox disaster in 1971, where 66 Rangers fans died; the 1979 The Who concert disaster where 11 died; the Luzhniki disaster in 1982, when 66 FC Spartak Moscow fans died; and at the Hillsborough disaster in 1989, 96 Liverpool fans were crushed to death in an overcrowded terrace, 95 of the 96 victims died from compressive asphyxia, with 93 dying directly from it and 2 others dying from related complications.
According to the post-mortem examinations, all of the deceased victims died of compressive asphyxia.

The Who concert disaster

1979 The Who concert disaster11 fans were killed11 persons were killed in a crowd crush
This is what occurred at the Ibrox disaster in 1971, where 66 Rangers fans died; the 1979 The Who concert disaster where 11 died; the Luzhniki disaster in 1982, when 66 FC Spartak Moscow fans died; and at the Hillsborough disaster in 1989, 96 Liverpool fans were crushed to death in an overcrowded terrace, 95 of the 96 victims died from compressive asphyxia, with 93 dying directly from it and 2 others dying from related complications.
Eleven people were unable to escape the dense crowd pushing toward them and died by asphyxiation.

1971 Ibrox disaster

Ibrox disasterSecond Ibrox disasterIbrox Disaster in 1971
This is what occurred at the Ibrox disaster in 1971, where 66 Rangers fans died; the 1979 The Who concert disaster where 11 died; the Luzhniki disaster in 1982, when 66 FC Spartak Moscow fans died; and at the Hillsborough disaster in 1989, 96 Liverpool fans were crushed to death in an overcrowded terrace, 95 of the 96 victims died from compressive asphyxia, with 93 dying directly from it and 2 others dying from related complications.
Most of the deaths were caused by compressive asphyxia, with bodies being stacked up to six feet deep in the area.

Asphyxiant gas

asphyxiantasphyxiantsasphyxiant or toxic gas
Breathing of oxygen-depleted air can lead to death by asphyxiation (suffocation).

Erotic asphyxiation

autoerotic asphyxiationauto-erotic asphyxiationerotic asphyxia
Erotic asphyxiation can lead to accidental death due to asphyxia.

Crushing (execution)

crushingpressed to deathpressing
Pressing is a form of torture or execution that works through asphyxia, e.g. burking.
Peine forte et dure (Law French for "forceful and hard punishment") was a method of torture formerly used in the common law legal system, in which a defendant who refused to plead ("stood mute") would be subjected to having heavier and heavier stones placed upon his or her chest until a plea was entered, or as the weight of the stones on the chest became too great for the condemned to breathe, fatal suffocation would occur.

Traumatic asphyxia

crush asphyxia
"Traumatic asphyxia" or "crush asphyxia" usually refers to compressive asphyxia resulting from being crushed or pinned under a large weight or force.

Grappling hold

Katame-wazaheadlocksubmission hold
Such techniques are used either to tire the opponent or as complementary or distractive moves in combination with pinning holds, or sometimes even as submission holds.

Ola Didrik Saugstad

Research by Ola Didrik Saugstad and others led to new international guidelines on newborn resuscitation in 2010, recommending the use of normal air instead of 100% oxygen.
Already as a medical student he became interested in the Swedish professor Gösta Rooth's research in the field of perinatal medicine and especially intrauterine asphyxia, and Rooth invited him to come to Sweden and do research; thus, after graduation he was a research fellow at Uppsala University Hospital.

Knee-on-stomach

Uki-gatameknee on stomachknee-on-belly position
Examples of chest compression include the knee-on-stomach position; or techniques such as leg scissors (also referred to as body scissors and in budō referred to as do-jime; 胴絞, "trunk strangle" or "body triangle") where a participant wraps his or her legs around the opponent's midsection and squeezes them together.
The top combatant can sometimes submit the bottom combatant from this position by simply using his or her weight to compress the torso, hence causing pain and compressive asphyxia.

Oxygen

OO 2 molecular oxygen
Asphyxia or asphyxiation is a condition of deficient supply of oxygen to the body that arises from abnormal breathing.

Human body

bodyhuman anatomyhuman physiology
Asphyxia or asphyxiation is a condition of deficient supply of oxygen to the body that arises from abnormal breathing.

Ancient Greek

GreekClassical GreekGr.
The word asphyxia is from Ancient Greek α- "without" and σφύξις sphyxis, "squeeze" (throb of heart).