Aspirin

acetylsalicylic acidASAbaby aspirinlow dose aspirinasprinAspro8-Hour Bayeracetylsalicylateacetylsalicylic acid (Aspirin)aspirin allergy
Aspirin, also known as acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), is a medication used to treat pain, fever, or inflammation.wikipedia
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Kawasaki disease

mucocutaneous lymph node syndromeKawasaki
Specific inflammatory conditions which aspirin is used to treat include Kawasaki disease, pericarditis, and rheumatic fever.
Typically, initial treatment consists of high doses of aspirin and immunoglobulin.

Asthma

asthma attackbronchial asthmaasthmatic
More significant side effects include stomach ulcers, stomach bleeding, and worsening asthma.
Other potential triggers include medications such as aspirin and beta blockers.

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug

non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugNSAIDsnonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs
Aspirin is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) and works similarly to other NSAIDs but also suppresses the normal functioning of platelets.
The most prominent NSAIDs are aspirin, ibuprofen and naproxen, all available over the counter in most countries.

Colorectal cancer

colon cancerbowel cancerintestinal cancer
It may also decrease the risk of certain types of cancer, particularly colorectal cancer.
Aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs decrease the risk.

Bayer

Bayer AGBayer CropScienceBayer Pharmaceuticals
In 1897, scientists at the Bayer company began studying acetylsalicylic acid as a less-irritating replacement medication for common salicylate medicines.
Founded in Barmen in 1863 as a dyestuffs factory, Bayer's first and best-known product was aspirin.

WHO Model List of Essential Medicines

World Health Organization's List of Essential MedicinesList of Essential MedicinesModel List of Essential Medicines
It is on the World Health Organization's (WHO's) List of Essential Medicines, the safest and most effective medicines needed in a health system.
Acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin)

Tension headache

tension-type headachechronic tension headachemuscle contraction headaches
Among primary headaches, the International Classification of Headache Disorders distinguishes between tension headache (the most common), migraine, and cluster headache.
Pain medication, such as aspirin and ibuprofen, are effective for the treatment of tension headache.

Anti-inflammatory

antiinflammatoryanti-inflammatoriesanti-inflammatory drug
Aspirin is used as an anti-inflammatory agent for both acute and long-term inflammation, as well as for treatment of inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis.
Some common examples of NSAIDs are aspirin, ibuprofen, and naproxen.

Clopidogrel

Frequently, aspirin is combined with an ADP receptor inhibitor, such as clopidogrel, prasugrel, or ticagrelor to prevent blood clots.
It is also used together with aspirin in heart attacks and following the placement of a coronary artery stent (dual antiplatelet therapy).

Antipyretic

febrifugeantipyreticsanti-pyretic
Although aspirin's use as an antipyretic in adults is well established, many medical societies and regulatory agencies (including the American Academy of Family Physicians, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)) strongly advise against using aspirin for treatment of fever in children because of the risk of Reye's syndrome, a rare but often fatal illness associated with the use of aspirin or other salicylates in children during episodes of viral or bacterial infection.
The most common antipyretics in the United States are ibuprofen and aspirin, which are nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) used primarily as analgesics (pain relievers), but which also have antipyretic properties; and acetaminophen (paracetamol), an analgesic with weak anti-inflammatory properties.

Reye syndrome

Reye's syndromeReye-like syndrome
Although aspirin's use as an antipyretic in adults is well established, many medical societies and regulatory agencies (including the American Academy of Family Physicians, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)) strongly advise against using aspirin for treatment of fever in children because of the risk of Reye's syndrome, a rare but often fatal illness associated with the use of aspirin or other salicylates in children during episodes of viral or bacterial infection. It is not generally recommended in children with infections because of the risk of Reye syndrome.
About 90% of cases in children are associated with aspirin (salicylate) use.

Ibuprofen

MotrinChildren's Motrinibruprofen
Aspirin is an effective analgesic for acute pain, but is generally considered inferior to ibuprofen for the alleviation of pain because aspirin is more likely to cause gastrointestinal bleeding.
On 9 July 2015, the US FDA toughened warnings of increased heart attack and stroke risk associated with ibuprofen and related NSAIDs; the NSAID aspirin is not included in this warning.

Pre-eclampsia

preeclampsiatoxemiatoxemia of pregnancy
Low-dose aspirin supplementation has moderate benefits when used for prevention of pre-eclampsia.
Recommendations for prevention include: aspirin in those at high risk, calcium supplementation in areas with low intake, and treatment of prior hypertension with medications.

Adenosine diphosphate receptor inhibitor

adenosine diphosphate (ADP) receptor inhibitorantagonistP2Y 12 receptor inhibitors
Frequently, aspirin is combined with an ADP receptor inhibitor, such as clopidogrel, prasugrel, or ticagrelor to prevent blood clots.
These drugs are frequently administrated in combination with aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) to enhance platelet inhibition especially in patients with ACS or undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI).

Ticagrelor

Frequently, aspirin is combined with an ADP receptor inhibitor, such as clopidogrel, prasugrel, or ticagrelor to prevent blood clots.
The drug is combined with acetylsalicylic acid unless the latter is contraindicated.

Adverse effect

adverse effectsside effectsside effect
One common adverse effect is an upset stomach.
Bleeding of the intestine associated with aspirin therapy

Coronary artery disease

coronary heart diseaseischemic heart diseaseischaemic heart disease
For the prevention of myocardial infarction (MI) in someone with documented or suspected coronary artery disease, much lower doses are taken once daily.
Additional medications such as antiplatelets (including aspirin), beta blockers, or nitroglycerin may be recommended.

Cancer

cancersmalignanciescancerous
It may also decrease the risk of certain types of cancer, particularly colorectal cancer.
Aspirin has been found to reduce the risk of death from cancer by about 7%. COX-2 inhibitors may decrease the rate of polyp formation in people with familial adenomatous polyposis; however, it is associated with the same adverse effects as NSAIDs.

Prasugrel

Frequently, aspirin is combined with an ADP receptor inhibitor, such as clopidogrel, prasugrel, or ticagrelor to prevent blood clots.
Prasugrel is used in combination with low dose aspirin to prevent thrombosis in patients with ACS, including unstable angina pectoris, non-ST elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI), and ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), who are planned for treatment with PCI.

Antiplatelet drug

antiplateletplatelet aggregation inhibitorantiplatelet agent
This is called dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT).
Aspirin

Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency

favismG6PD deficiencyG6PD
Aspirin is known to cause hemolytic anemia in people who have the genetic disease glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency, particularly in large doses and depending on the severity of the disease.
Certain medicines including aspirin, quinine and other antimalarials derived from quinine.

Stroke

strokesischemic strokecerebrovascular accident
Aspirin is also used long-term to help prevent further heart attacks, ischaemic strokes, and blood clots in people at high risk.
Prevention includes decreasing risk factors, as well as possibly aspirin, statins, surgery to open up the arteries to the brain in those with problematic narrowing, and warfarin in those with atrial fibrillation.

Platelet

plateletsplatelet aggregationplatelet count
Aspirin is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) and works similarly to other NSAIDs but also suppresses the normal functioning of platelets.
Aspirin irreversibly disrupts platelet function by inhibiting cyclooxygenase-1 (COX1), and hence normal hemostasis.

Allergy

allergiesallergicallergic reaction
The reaction is caused by salicylate intolerance and is not a true allergy, but rather an inability to metabolize even small amounts of aspirin, resulting in an overdose.
Aside from these ambient allergens, allergic reactions can result from foods, insect stings, and reactions to medications like aspirin and antibiotics such as penicillin.

Food and Drug Administration

FDAU.S. Food and Drug AdministrationUnited States Food and Drug Administration
Although aspirin's use as an antipyretic in adults is well established, many medical societies and regulatory agencies (including the American Academy of Family Physicians, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)) strongly advise against using aspirin for treatment of fever in children because of the risk of Reye's syndrome, a rare but often fatal illness associated with the use of aspirin or other salicylates in children during episodes of viral or bacterial infection.
Over-the-counter (OTC) drugs like aspirin are drugs and combinations that do not require a doctor's prescription.