Clarence Thomas, since October 23, 1991<ref>{{Cite web| title=Justice Clarence Thomas| url=http://supremecourthistory.org/history-of-the-court/the-current-court/justice-clarence-thomas/| publisher=The Supreme Court Historical Society| location=Washington, D.C.| access-date=January 13, 2018| archive-date=May 15, 2020| archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20200515180814/https://supremecourthistory.org/history-of-the-court/the-current-court/justice-clarence-thomas/| url-status=dead}}</ref>
Stephen Breyer, since August 3, 1994<ref>{{Cite web| title=Justice Stephen G. Breyer| url=http://supremecourthistory.org/history-of-the-court/the-current-court/justice-stephen-breyer/| publisher=The Supreme Court Historical Society| location=Washington, D.C.| access-date=January 13, 2018| archive-date=November 18, 2019| archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20191118144739/http://www.supremecourthistory.org/history-of-the-court/the-current-court/justice-stephen-breyer/| url-status=dead}}</ref>
President Richard Nixon introduces Burger as his nominee for the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court
Samuel Alito, since January 31, 2006<ref>{{Cite web| title=Justice Samuel Anthony Alito, Jr.| url=http://supremecourthistory.org/history-of-the-court/the-current-court/justice-samuel-anthony-alito-jr/| publisher=The Supreme Court Historical Society| location=Washington, D.C.| access-date=January 13, 2018| archive-date=June 16, 2020| archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20200616065838/http://supremecourthistory.org/history-of-the-court/the-current-court/justice-samuel-anthony-alito-jr/| url-status=dead}}</ref>
Official portrait of Warren Burger
Sonia Sotomayor, since August 8, 2009<ref>{{Cite web| title=Justice Sonia Sotomayor| url=http://supremecourthistory.org/history-of-the-court/the-current-court/justice-sonia-sotomayor/| publisher=The Supreme Court Historical Society| location=Washington, D.C.| access-date=January 13, 2018| archive-date=March 4, 2020| archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20200304175151/https://supremecourthistory.org/history-of-the-court/the-current-court/justice-sonia-sotomayor/| url-status=dead}}</ref>
With Betty Ford between them, Chief Justice Burger swears in President Gerald Ford following the resignation of Richard Nixon on August 9, 1974
Elena Kagan, since August 7, 2010<ref>{{Cite web| title=Justice Elena Kagan| url=http://supremecourthistory.org/history-of-the-court/the-current-court/justice-elena-kagan/| publisher=The Supreme Court Historical Society| location=Washington, D.C.| access-date=January 13, 2018| archive-date=May 24, 2020| archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20200524161410/https://supremecourthistory.org/history-of-the-court/the-current-court/justice-elena-kagan/| url-status=dead}}</ref>
Burger's burial site, next to his wife's, at Arlington National Cemetery
Neil Gorsuch, since April 10, 2017<ref>{{Cite web| title=Justice Neil M. Gorsuch| url=http://supremecourthistory.org/history-of-the-court/the-current-court/justice-neil-gorsuch/index.html| publisher=The Supreme Court Historical Society| location=Washington, D.C.| access-date=January 13, 2018| archive-date=November 22, 2019| archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20191122034749/http://supremecourthistory.org/history-of-the-court/the-current-court/justice-neil-gorsuch/index.html| url-status=dead}}</ref>
Brett Kavanaugh, since October 6, 2018<ref>{{cite web| url=https://apnews.com/8234f0b8a6194d8b89ff79f9b0c94f35/Kavanaugh-confirmed,-quickly-sworn-in;-major-Trump-victory| title=Kavanaugh sworn to high court after rancorous confirmation| last1=Fram| first1=Alan| last2=Mascaro| first2=Lisa| last3=Daly| first3=Matthew| date=October 6, 2018| website=ap.org| location=New York, New York| access-date=October 6, 2018| archive-date=June 16, 2020| archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20200616065846/https://apnews.com/8234f0b8a6194d8b89ff79f9b0c94f35/Kavanaugh-confirmed,-quickly-sworn-in;-major-Trump-victory| url-status=live}}</ref>
Amy Coney Barrett, since October 27, 2020<ref>{{cite web|author=Barbara Sprunt|title=Amy Coney Barrett Confirmed To Supreme Court, Takes Constitutional Oath|url=https://www.npr.org/2020/10/26/927640619/senate-confirms-amy-coney-barrett-to-the-supreme-court|website=npr.org|date=October 26, 2020|access-date=October 26, 2020|archive-date=October 27, 2020|archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20201027012410/https://www.npr.org/2020/10/26/927640619/senate-confirms-amy-coney-barrett-to-the-supreme-court|url-status=live}}</ref>

When, after his retirement, William O. Douglas attempted to take a more active role than was customary, maintaining that it was his prerogative to do so because of his senior status, he was rebuffed by Chief Justice Warren Burger and admonished by the whole Court.

- Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States

President Lyndon Johnson nominated sitting associate justice Abe Fortas to the position, but a Senate filibuster blocked his confirmation, and Johnson withdrew the nomination.

- Warren E. Burger
Clarence Thomas, since October 23, 1991<ref>{{Cite web| title=Justice Clarence Thomas| url=http://supremecourthistory.org/history-of-the-court/the-current-court/justice-clarence-thomas/| publisher=The Supreme Court Historical Society| location=Washington, D.C.| access-date=January 13, 2018| archive-date=May 15, 2020| archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20200515180814/https://supremecourthistory.org/history-of-the-court/the-current-court/justice-clarence-thomas/| url-status=dead}}</ref>

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Supreme Court of the United States

Highest court in the federal judiciary of the United States.

Highest court in the federal judiciary of the United States.

The Court lacked its own building until 1935; from 1791 to 1801, it met in Philadelphia's City Hall.
The Royal Exchange, New York City, the first meeting place of the Supreme Court
Chief Justice Marshall (1801–1835)
The U.S. Supreme Court Building, current home of the Supreme Court, which opened in 1935.
The Hughes Court in 1937, photographed by Erich Salomon. Members include Chief Justice Charles Evans Hughes (center), Louis Brandeis, Benjamin N. Cardozo, Harlan Stone, Owen Roberts, and the "Four Horsemen" Pierce Butler, James Clark McReynolds, George Sutherland, and Willis Van Devanter, who opposed New Deal policies.
Justices of the Supreme Court with President George W. Bush (center-right) in October 2005. The justices (left to right) are: Ruth Bader Ginsburg, David Souter, Antonin Scalia, John Paul Stevens, John Roberts, Sandra Day O'Connor, Anthony Kennedy, Clarence Thomas, and Stephen Breyer
John Roberts giving testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee during the 2005 hearings on his nomination to be chief justice
Ruth Bader Ginsburg giving testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee during the 1993 hearings on her nomination to be an associate justice
The interior of the United States Supreme Court
The first four female justices: O'Connor, Sotomayor, Ginsburg, and Kagan.
The current Roberts Court justices (since October 2020): Front row (left to right): Samuel Alito, Clarence Thomas, Chief Justice John Roberts, Stephen Breyer, and Sonia Sotomayor. Back row (left to right): Brett Kavanaugh, Elena Kagan, Neil Gorsuch, and Amy Coney Barrett.
Percentage of cases decided unanimously and by a one-vote margin from 1971 to 2016
The present U.S. Supreme Court building as viewed from the front
From the 1860s until the 1930s, the court sat in the Old Senate Chamber of the U.S. Capitol.
Seth P. Waxman at oral argument presents his case and answers questions from the justices.
Inscription on the wall of the Supreme Court Building from Marbury v. Madison, in which Chief Justice John Marshall outlined the concept of judicial review

As later set by the Judiciary Act of 1869, the court consists of the chief justice of the United States and eight associate justices.

For example, Chief Justice Warren Burger was an outspoken critic of the exclusionary rule, and Justice Scalia criticized the court's decision in Boumediene v. Bush for being too protective of the rights of Guantanamo detainees, on the grounds that habeas corpus was "limited" to sovereign territory.